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List of Concerts and Operas 

Faculty Recitals 

First Mr. Felix Salmond, Violoncellist November 30, 1931 

„ , (Miss Harriet Van Emden, Soprano. .) _ 
Second... { r ^December 14, 1931 

(Miss Lucile Lawrence, Harpist J 

Third Mr. Horatio Connell, Baritone January 18, 1932 

Fourth Mr. Ernest Zechiel January 21, 1932 

„..., (Miss Lucile Lawrence) tt . T „_ 

Fifth 1 \Harpists January 25, 1932 

(Mr. Carlos Salzedo. . j 

Si*th Madame Lea Luboshutz, Violinist. . . .February 1, 1932 

Seventh . . .Mr. Efrem Zimbalist, Violinist February 15, 1932 

Eighth . . . .Mr. Abram Chasins, Pianist February 23, 1932 

Ninth Madame Queena Mario, Soprano. . . .March 14, 1932 

Tenth Mr. David Saperton, Pianist April 4, 1932 

Eleventh. . .Mr. Louis Bailly, Violist April 11, 1932 

Twelfth. . .Mr. Fernando Germani, Organist April 18, 1932 



Special Concert 
The Musical Art Quartet January 9, 1932 



Students 1 Concerts 

(These programs, while listed alphabetically according to Instructor's name, 
are bound according to date) 

/November 25, 1931 
Students of Mr. Bachmann / January 11, 1932 

' April 5, 1932 

/Viola and 
Students of Dr. Bailly in <j Chamber Music. .April 29, 1932 

(.Chamber Music . . . May 4, 1932 

Students of Mr. Connell April 25, 1932 

Students of Mr. deGogorza April 27, 1932 

Students of Madame Fonaroff March 15, 1932 

Students of Madame Luboshutz November 23, 1931 

Students of Madame Mario May 16, 1932 

{December 9 1931 
April 19, 1932 

Students of Mr. Munz March 24, 1932 

/December 2, 1931 
Students of Mr. Salmond < May 11, 1932 

VMay 18, 1932 

Students of Mr. Saperton ) pn 

(May 5, 1932 
Students of Mr. Scalero 

in Composition May 12, 1932 

Students of Madame Sembrich May 23, 1932 

Students of Mr. Tabuteau 

in Wind Ensemble May 3, 1932 

Students of Miss van Emden March 22, 1932 

c j r w w /March 23, 1932 

Students of Madame Vengerova < 

(May 25, 1932 

! January 6, 1932 
March 16, 1932 
May 24, 1932 

Students of Mr. Salzedo and Miss Lawrence < e ruary 

(April 6, 1932 

„, ~ c ~ /December 16, 1931 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra < 

(January 29, 1932 



Chamber Music 

'November 8, 1931 
i December 13, 1931 

The Pennsylvania Museum of Art (January 31, 1932 

[March 6, 1932 
i April 17, 1932 



Concert Course 

„. o i_ i v<7 r> i • (October 10, 1931 

Westtown School, Westtown, Pennsylvania . . . .1 

(January 16, 1932 

Western Maryland College, Westminster, 

Maryland (November 6, 1931 

(April 8, 1932 

Hillside School, Norwalk, Connecticut \ 

(January 23, 1932 

Mary wood College, Scranton, Pennsylvania. . . J 

(April 26, 1932 

Demonstration School, Georgetown, Delaware. . .November 21, 1931 

/December 4, 1931 
University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware. .. .< January 15, 1932 

( March 15, 1932 

George School, George School, Pennsylvania . . J 

(February 20, 1932 

Moorestown Woman's Club, Moorestown, 

New Jersey December 7, 1931 

Sleighton Farm, Darlington, Pennsylvania January 10, 1932 

The Rambler Association, Moorestown, 

New Jersey January 12, 1932 

Coatesville Junior Century Club, Coatesville, 

Pennsylvania /January 14, 1932 

(May 5, 1932 
Unionville Joint Consolidated School, 

Union ville, Pennsylvania February 12, 1932 



Performances of Philadelphia Grand Opera Company in 
Affiliation with The Curtis Institute of Music 

First Tannhauser October 22, 1931 

Second Elektra October 29, 1931 

Third Madama Butterfly November 5, 1931 

Fourth LaTraviata November 12, 1931 

(November 19, 1931 
Fifth Wozzeck 1 

(November 24, 1931 

Sixth Cavalleria Rusticana December 3, 1931 

Seventh Boris Godounov December 10, 1931 

Eighth Haensel und Gretel 

and Die Puppenfee December 19, 1931 

Ninth Tosca January 7, 1932 

Tenth Thais January 14, 1932 

Eleventh Rigoletto January 28, 1932 

Twelfth Les Pecheurs De Perles. . . .February 4, 1932 

Thirteenth . . .Lohengrin February 18, 1932 

Fourteenth .. .Faust February 25, 1932 

Fifteenth Elektra March 3, 1932 

Sixteenth The Secret of Suzanne and 

Pagliacci March 10, 1932 

Seventeenth . .UHeure Espagnole and 

World Premiere of 

"H. P." March 31, 1932 

Eighteenth . . .Carmen April 7, 1932 

Nineteenth . . . AibA April 14, 1932 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
EIGHTH SEASON— 1931-1932 



First Faculty Recital 



MR. FELIX 

MR. HARRY 



, V ioloncellisf 
at tne Piano 



Monday Evening, "Hovember 30, 1931 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



w 



I. 

*Sonata in D minor FRANK BrE)GE 

(in two movements) 

Allegro ben moderato 

Adagio ma non troppo — Andante con moto — 

Molto allegro e agitato — Adagio ma non troppo — ■ 

Allegro moderato 



II. 

Sonata, No. 1, in F sharp minor JEAN HuRE 

(in one movement) 



III. 

Sonata, No. 3, in A major, Opus 69 LuDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN 

Allegro, ma non tanto 
Scherzo: Allegro molto 
Adagio cantabile 
Allegro vivace 



•This Sonata was performed for the first time anywhere by Mr. Salmond and Mr. William 
Murdoch, in London, July, 1917. 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
EIGHTH SEASON— 1931-1932 



Second Faculty Recital 



MISS LUCILE LAWRENCE, Harpist 
Collaborating 

MR. HARRY KAUFMAN at tke Piano 



Monday Evening, December 14, 1931 

at 8:30 o J cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



i. 

Recitative and Aria: "Dove sono i } 

bei momenti" from "Le Noase > Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 
di Figaro" ) 

II. 

Erstarrung \ 

Du bist die Ruh' I 

Zuleika \ Franz Schubert 

Auf dem Wasser zu singen i 

Rastlose Liebe 1 

III. 

Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen Gustav Mahler 

Wenn mein Schatz Hochzeit macht 
Gieng huit' Morgen fiber's Feld 
Ich hab' ein gluhend' Messer 
Die zwei blauen Augen 



IV. 

Sainte | 

Cinq Melodies Populaires Grecques j 

Transcribed for harp by Carlos Salzedo 
Le Reveil de la mariee 
Li'bas vers l'figlise 
Quel Galant! 

Chanson des cueilleuses de lentisques 
Tout Gai! 



Maurice Ravel 



Recitative and Aria: 

"Ah! fors 1 e lui" from "La Traviata". 



.Giuseppe Verdi 



LYON bf HEALY HARP 



Recitative and Aria: "Dove sono i 

bei momentf from "Le Nozze 

di Figaro , ' > 

Recitative 

E Susanna non vien! Sono ansiosa di saper 
come il conte accolse la proposta. Alquanto ardito 
il progetto mi par! e ad uno sposo si vivace e 
geloso! Ma che mal c'£? Cangiando i miei 
vestiti con quelli di Susanna, e i suoi co' miei, 
a favor della notte. O cielo! a qual umil stato 
f atale io son ridotta da un consorte crudel ! 
Che dopo avermi con un misto inaudito d'in- 
fedelta, di gelosia, di sdegno, prima amata, indi 
offesa, e alfin tradita, fammi or cercar da una 
mia servaita ! 



Aria 

Dove sono i bei momenti 
Di dolcezza e di piacer? 
Dove andaro i giuramenti, 
Di quel labbro menzogner? 

Perche mai, se in pianti e in pene 
Per me tutto si cangi6, 
La memoria di quel bene 
Dal mio sen non trapassd? 

Ah ! se almen la mia costanza 
Nel languire amando ognor, 
Mi portasse una speranza 
Di cangiar l'ingrato cor! 



(Translation) 

Recitative 

Still Susanna delays! I am anxious to be 
told how his lordship regards this last proposal. 
Brimful of danger does the project appear, with 
such a husband, of a temper quick, and jealous! 
But yet, what harm? Simply changing raiment 
with my own maid Susanna, and she mine tak- 
ing; night the plan will favor — O heaven! to 
what degradation I'm yielding! how am I 
humbled by a husband's default, who after hav- 
ing 'midst the strangest admixture of faithless 
vows, of jealous transports and fury, first 
adored me, then ill-treated, and last betrayed, 
brings me to this, calling my maid to aid me! 

Aria 

Vanished are ye, bright hours, for ever, 
When love's rapture and bliss I knew; 
When he promised to leave me never, 
When I thought his false lips true! 

If but anxious thoughts must haunt me, 
If for me the past is dead. 
Why in mem'ry still to taunt me, 
Live the joys forever fled? 

In my heart where faith unshaken 
Dwells 'mid thoughts that ne'er can range. 
Ah! might hope like dawn awaken 
Whispering: soon his heart will change. 



Erstarrung 



Ich such' im Schnee vergebens 
Nach ihrer Tritte Spur, — 

Wo sie an meinem Arme 
Durchstrich die grune Flur. 

Ich will den Boden kiissen, 
Durchdringen Eis und Schnee 

Mit meinen heissen Thranen, 
Bis ich die Erde seh! 

Wo find' ich eine Bliithe? 

Wo find' ich griines Gras? 
Die Blumen sind erstorben, 

Der Rasen sieht so blass. 

Soil denn kein Angedenken 
Ich nehmen mit von hier? — 

Wenn meine Schmerzen schweigen, 
Wer sagt mir dann von ihr? 

Mein Herz ist wie erstorben, 
Kalt starrt ihr Bild darin, 

.Schmilzt je das Herz mir wieder, 
Fliesst auch ihr Bild dahin. 

— Muller 



(Translation) 

Benumbed 

The traces of her footsteps 

I seek, alas, in vain, 
Where on my fond arm leaning, 

She cross'd the bright green plain. 

I'll kiss the wint'ry carpet, 
And with my scalding tears 

Dissolve the freezing snowflakes 
Until the ground appears. 

Do flowers bloom no longer? 

Is grass no longer green? 
The flowers all have perished, 

The grass is sere and wan. 

Earth, canst thou no reminder 
Of bygone smiles confer? 

When all my griefs are silent 
Who'll speak to me of her? 

It seems my heart is frozen, 
And there her face doth stay: 

Should e'er my heart be melted, 
Her face will melt away. 



Du bist die Ruh' 

Du bist die Ruh', 
Der Friede mild, 
Die Sehnsucht du, 
Und was sie stillt. 

Ich weihe dir 
Voll Lust und Schmerz 
Zur Wohnung hier 
Mein Aug' und Herz. 

Kehr ein bei mir 
Und schliesse du 
Still hinter dir 
Die Pforten zu! 

Treib andern Schmerz 
Aus dieser Brust! 
Voll sei dies Herz 
Von deiner Lust. 

Dies Augenzelt, 
Von deinem Glanz 
Allein erhellt, 
O fiill es ganz! 



(Translation) 

Thou Art Sweet Peace 

Thou art sweet peace 
And tranquil rest, 
I long for thee 
To soothe my breast. 

I dedicate 
Mid joys and sighs, 
Thy dwelling in 
My heart and eyes. 

Come, then, to me, 
And close the door, 
And never, never 
Leave me more. 

Chase ev'ry pain 
From out this breast, 
Calming this heart 
To joyful rest. 

Let thy pure light 
My glance control 
With lustre bright 
Fill thou my soul. 



-RuCKERT 



Zuleika 

Was bedeutet die Bewegung? 
Bringt der Ost mir frohe Kunde? 
Seiner Schwingen frische Regung 
Kiihlt des Herzens tiefe Wunde. 

Kosend spielt er mit dem Staube, 
Jagt ihn auf in leichten Wolkchen, 
Treibt zur sichern Rebenlaube 
Der Insekten frohes Volkchen. 

Lindert sanft der Sonne Gliihen, 
Kiihlt auch mir die heissen Wangen, 
Kiisst die Reben noch im Fliehen 
Die auf Feld und Hiigel prangen. 

Und mir bringt sein leises Fliistern 
Von dem Freunde tausend Griisse; 
Eh' noch diese HGgel diistern, 
Griissen mich wohl tausend Kiisse. 

Und so kannst du weiter ziehen, 
Diene Freunden und Betriibten, 
Dort, wo hohe Mauern gliihen, 
Dort find' ich bald den Vielgeliebten. 

Ach, die wahre Herzenskunde, 
Liebeshauch, erfrischtes Leben, 
Wird mir nur aus seinem Munde, 
Kann mir nur sein Athem geben. 

— Goethe 



(Translation) 

Suleika 

Whence this air my forehead laving? 
Brings the East-wind gladsome greeting? 
Of his wings the gentle waving 
Calms the heart's despairful beating^. 

With the dusk he's toying lightly, 
Driving cloudlets helter-skelter, 
Soon the insect-horde so sprightly 
'Neath the vines shall seek a shelter. 

Bland he cools the sun's hot kisses, 
Cools my burning cheek in passing, 
In his flight the vine caresses, 
Over hill and valley crossing. 

Unto me his gentle whisper 

From my love bears many a greeting: 

Ere shadows fall at vesper 

Fondly lip shall lip be meeting! 

And so onward may'st thou wander 
Bearing joy as thou dost hover: 
See! where walls are gleaming yonder, 
There I shall meet my own true lover! 

Ah! the rapture love can lavish, 
Sigh for sigh, and all true blisses, 
From his lips alone can ravish, 
Live but in his ardent kisses. 



Auf dem Wasser zu singen 

Mitten im Schimmer der spiegelnden Wellen 
Gleitet wie Schwane der wankende Kahn. 
Ach, auf der Freude sanft schimmernden Wellen 
Gleitet die Seele dahin wie der Kahn. 
Denn von dem Himmel herab auf die Wellen 
Tanzet das Abendroth rund um den Kahn. 

Ober den Wipfeln des westlichen Haines 
Winket uns freundlich der rothliche Schein. 
Unter den Zweigen des ostlichen Haines 
Siiuselt der Calmus im rbthlichen Schein; 
Freude des Himmels und Ruhe des Haines 
Athmet die Seel' im errothenden Schein. 

Ach, es entschwindet mit thauigem Fliigel 
Mir auf den wiegenden Wellen die Zeit; 
Morgen entschwindet mit schimmerndem Fliigel 
Wieder wie gestern und heute die Zeit, 
Bis ich auf hoherem strahlenden Fliigel 
Selber entschwinde der wechselnden Zeit. 

■ — Stolberg 



(Translation) 

To be sung on the Waters 

Midst the bright sheen of the mirror-like waters, 
Swan-like is floating the wavering boat ; 
Gently along on these glittering waters, 
Glideth our spirit away like a boat. 
Dawn from the Heav'ns on the tremulous waters 
Rich tints of evening illume the swift boat. 

Over the beauty of each western valley, 
Cheerfully greets us the reddening glow; 
Under the branches in each eastern valley 
Whispers the reed in the reddening glow. 
Gladness from Heaven, and peace from the 

valley, 
Breathe o'er the soul in the red evening glow. 

Thus disappears on a light, dewy pinion, 
Swiftly receding like waters, the time; 
Morrows will vanish on that rapid pinion, 
Even as yesterday, now, and all time. 
Till I, on soaring and radiant pinion, 
Vanish away from the changes of time. 



Rastlose Liebe 

Dem Schnee, dem Regen, 
Dem Wind entgegen, 
Im Dampf der Kliifte, 
Durch Nebeldiifte, 
Immer zu! immer zu! 
Ohne Rast und Ruh'! 

Lieber durch Leiden 
Wollt' ich mich schlagen, 
Als so viel Freuden 
Des Lebens ertragen. 

Alle das Neigen 
Von Herzen zu Herzen, 
Ach, wie so eigen 
Schaffet es Schmerzen! 

Wie. soil ich fliehen? 
Wiilderwiirts ziehen? 
Alles vergebens! 
Krone des Lebens, 
Gliick ohne Ruh, 
Liebe bist du! 



(Translation) 

Restless Love 

The fierce storm breasting, 
No moment resting, 
The snowdrift facing, 
Through dense fog racing, 
Still away, still away, 
No repose, no stay. 

Rather to toil 
Opposing resistance, 
Than so much joy 
Undergo in existence. 

All the devotion 

That heart to heart renders, 

Ah ! what emotion 

And pain it engenders. 

How shall I flee? 
O'er land or sea? 
All's unavailing. 
Crown of existence, 
Blissful annoy, 
Love's restless joy. 



— Goethe 



Wenn mein Schatz Hochzeit macht 

Wenn mein Schatz Hochzeit macht, 

Frohliche Hochzeit macht, 

Hab' ich meinen traurigen Tag! 

Geh' ich in mein Kammerlein 

Dunkles Kammerlein, 

Weine um meinen lieben Schatz ! 

Bliimlein blau! Verdorre nicht! 

Voglein siiss! 
Du singst auf griiner Haide 
Ach ! wie ist die Welt so schein ! 
Zikuth! Zikuth! Zikuth! 

Singet nicht! Bliihet nicht! 

Lenz ist schon vorbei ! 

Alles Singen ist nun aus! 

Des Abends, wenn ich schlafen geh'! 

Denk' ich an mein Leide! 



(Translation) 

On My Sweetheart's Wedding Day 

On my sweetheart's wedding day, 
Happy wedding day, 
My heart is strangely sad ! 
To my chamber small I go 
My chamber small and drear, 
And weep there for my own sweet love. 

Flower so blue, wither not! 

Bird so sweet! 

Thou singest upon the verdant heath! 

How wondrous fair the world! 

Cheep! cheep! cheep! cheep! 

Bird, sing not! Flower bloom not! 

Springtime now is o'er! 

All singing too, has died away! 

When at eve I go to rest, 

I brood upon my sorrow! 



Gieng heutf Morgen iiber's Feld 

Gieng heut' Morgen iiber's Feld, 

Thau noch auf den Grasern hieng 

Sprach zu mir der lust'ge Fink. 

"Ei, du! Gelt? 

Guten Morgen ! 

Ei, Gelt? Du! 

Wird's nicht eine schone Welt? 

Zink! 

Schon und flink! 

Wie mir doch die Welt 

Gefallt!" 

Und die Glocken-blum' am Feld 
Hat mir lustig, guter Ding': 
Mit den Glockchen, klinge, kling. 
Ihren Morgengruss geschellt. 

Und da fieng im Sonnenschein 

Gleich die Welt zu f unkeln an ; 

Alles, Ton und Farbe gewann 

Vogel gross und klein! 

Guten Tag! Guten Tag! 

Ist's nicht eine schone Welt? 

''Nun fiingt auch mein Gliick wohl an?! 

Nein! Nein! 

Das ich mein', 

Mir nimmer bliihen kann!" 



(Translation) 

Over the Fields I Walked at Morn 

Over the fields I walked at morn, 

The grass still wet with dew. 

Said to me the merry finch. 

"Well, what say you ? 

A^ fine good morning ! 

What say you? 

Is it not a lovely world ? 

Tweet! 

Fair and fleet! 

How sweet the world to me doth seem!" 

And the blue bells in the field, 
With their happy, joyous ring, 
With their merry ting-a-ling, 
Their morning greeting pealed ! 

Then, in the sun's bright rays, 

The world began to gleam. 

All things color and tone did seem, 

birds both large and small. 
"Good day! good day! 

Is it not a lovely world? 

Will fortune now upon me rain? 

No! No! 

This boon, I know 

1 never more may gain." 



Ich hab 1 ein gluhend' Messer 

Ich hab' ein gliihend Messer in meiner Brust, 

o weh! 
O weh! 
Das schneid't so tief in jeder Freud' und Lust, 

so tief! 
So tief! 

Es schneid't so weh und tief! 
Ach, was ist das fiir ein boser Gast! 
Nimmer halt er Ruh'; nimmer halt er Rast! ' 
Nicht bei Tag, nicht bei Nacht, wenn ich 

schlief ! 
O weh! 

Wenn ich in den Himmel seh! 

Seh' ich zwei blaue Augen steh'n! 

Wenn ich im gelben Felde geh', 

Seh' ich von Fern das blonde Haar im Winde 

weh'n ! 
Wenn ich aus dem Traum auf-fahr' 
Und hore klingen ihr silbern Lachen. 
Ich wollt' ich lag auf der schwarzen Bahr', 
Kiinnt nimmer die Augen aufmachen! 



(Translation) 

I Have a Glowing Knife Within My 
Heart 

I have a glowing knife within my heart, 

alas! 
Alas! 
It cuts so deep in all my joy and bliss, 

so deep ! 
So deep! 

Oh! What an evil guest! 

Never knows he peace, never knows he rest, 
Nor bv dav, nor by night, as I sleep. 
Alas! 

When I gaze upon the sky 

Two eyes of blue seem nigh 

When o'er the yellow field I go 

I see afar her flaxen hair in the breezes blow. 

When from my dreams I start with dread, 

And hear her silver laughter rise. 

T would I lay here stark and dead 

Forever might close mine eyes. 



Die zwei blauen Augen 

Die zwei blauen Augen von meinem Schatz, 
Die haben mich in die weite Welt geschickt. 
Da musst' ich Abschied nehmen vom aller- 

liebsten Platz ! 
O Augen blau warum habt ihr mich ange- 

blickt!? 
Nun hab' ich ewig Leid und Gramen! 

Ich bin ausgegangen in stiller Nacht, 
Wohl fiber die dunkle Haide; 
Hat mir Niemand Ade gesagt. 
Mein Ges^ell' war Lieb' und Leide! 

Auf der Strasse steht ein Lindenbaum, 

Da hab' ich zum ersten Mai im Schlaf geruht! 

Der hat seine Bliithen fiber mich geschneit 

Da wusst' ich nicht, wie das Leben thut 

War Alles wieder gut! 

Lieb' und Leid, und Welt, und Traum! 



(Translation) 

The Two Blue Eyes 

The two blue eyes of my sweetheart 

Did send me in the great, wide world to stray 

And bade me from my loved abode depart. 

eyes so blue, why did you glance my way? 
Now have I ever grief and sorrow ! 

In the silent night I went my way 
Over the somber heath ; 
No one to me farewell did say. 
My comrade was sorrow and grief. 

By the road side stands a linden tree 

Beneath its shade I first both peace and rest 

did find! 
It showered its blossoms o'er my bed, 

1 knew not then that life could be unkind, 
AH things came fair to mind, 

Love, grief, my dream, the world so free. 



Sainte 

A la fenetre recelant 
Le santal vieux qui se dedore 
De la viole ntencelant 
Jadis selon flute ou mandore 
Est la sainte pflle etalant 
Le livre vieux qui se deplie 
Du Magnificat ruisselant 
Jadis selon vfpre ou complie. 

A ce vitrage d'ostensoir 

Que fr6le une harpe par l'Ange 

Formee avec son vol du soir 

Pour la delicate phalange 

Du doigt que sans le vieux santal 

Ni le vieux livre elle balance 

Sur le plumage instrumental 

Musicienne du silence. 

— Mallarme 



(Translation) 

The Saint 

So calm and still the holy saint 

Stands in a frame of gilded wood, 

Where viols are carved and horns and cymbals 

quaint, 
And the blest, holy rood. 
And the pale saint holds in his hands 
The ancient book in red and gold 
From which as holy church commands 
Was chanted the High Mass of old. 

A coloured window over all, 

And angel with harp of gold, sweeping the 

strings, 
Sheds light when shadows fall. 
And so with his viols and psalter, 
Amid the faded gilded wood, 
Within his niche above the altar 
The holy saint for years has stood. 
Oh, great musician of the silence. 



Cinq Melodies Populaires Grecques 

(French translation by M. D. Calvocoressi) 

Le Reveil de la mariee 

Reveille-toi, perdrix mignonne. 

Ouvre au matin tes ailes. 

Trois grains de beaute, mon coeur en est brOle. 

Vois le ruban d'or que je t'apporte, 

Pour le nouer autour de tes cheveux. _ 

Si tu veux, ma belle, viens nous marierl 

Dans nos deux families, tous sont allies! 



(Translation) 

Five Greek Folk Songs 
Wake Up, My Dear 

Wake up, my dear, my bonnie birdie, 

Spread thy white wings, 'tis morning. 

With thy beauty, love, 

This heart of mine is burnt. 

A ribbon, love, I bring to thee, 

Say, wilt thou wear it? 

Binding thy hair as bright as gold. 

Love, come let us marry, we are young and gay! 

Dearest, do not tarry, none will say us nay. 



La-bas, vers l'eglise 

La-bas, vers l'eglise, 

Vers l'eglise Ayio Sidero, 

L'Cglise, 6 Vierge sainte, 

L'eglise Ayio Costanndino 

Se sont reunis, 

Rassembles en nombre infini, 

Du monde, 6 Vierge sainte, 

Du monde tous les plus braves! 



( Translation) 

Yonder, Where Stands the Church 

Yonder, where stands the church, 

The church of Ayio Sidero, 

The church, Oh Blessed Virgin, 

Of Ayio Costandino; 

There have gathered together, 

There assembled in endless numbers, 

The bravest, Oh Holy Virgin, 

The very bravest of the world ! 



Quel galant m'est comparable 

Quel galant m'est comparable, 
D'entre ceux qu'on voit passer? 
Dis, dame Vassiliki? 
Vois, pendus a ma ceinture, 
Pistolets et sabre aigu. . . . 
Et c'est toi que j'aime! 



(Translation) 

Which Gallant Can Compare 
With Me? 

Which gallant can compare with me, 
Love, of all you see pass by? 
Say, oh, proud Vassiliki? 
See my sword, I draw so freely, 
See my pistols bright and new. . . . 
And, oh love, I love you. 



Chanson des cueilleuses de lentisques 

O joie de mon flme, 

Joie de mon coeur, 

Tresor qui m'est si cher; 

Joie de l'arne et du coeur 

Toi que j'aime ardemment, 

Tu es plus beau qu'un ange. 

O lorsque tu parais, 

Ange si doux devant nos yeux. 

Comme un bel ange blond, 

Sous le clair soleil, 

Helas! tous nos pauvres coeurs soupirent! 



(Translation) 

Song of the Lentisk Gatherers 

Oh, my best beloved, 

My heart's treasure, 

My dearest one, 

Oh, my joy, 

Thou whom I love so well. 

Thou'rt like an angel 

Come from Heaven. 

And when thou comest, dear. 

Like angel bright with smiling eyes, 

Like an angel fair in the clear sunshine 

Then, oh love, am I worn with sighing. 



Tout gai! 

Tout gai! Ha, tout gai! 
Belle jambe, tireli, qui danse; 
Belle jambe, la vaisselle danse, 
Tra la la la 



(Translation) 

Be Gay! 

Be gay, love, so gay. 
See, the moon shines 
Ti re li, so brightly; 
Come and dance, love. 
Come and trip so lightly. 
Tra la la 



Recitative and Aria: "Ah, fors' e lui" 

from ll La Traviata" 

Recitative 

£ strano! in core scolpiti ho quegli accenti! 
Saria per me sventura un serio amore? Che 
risolvi, o turbata anima mia? Null'uomo 
ancora l'accendeva. Oh, gioja ch'io non conobbi, 
esser amata amando! E sdegnarla poss'io per 
l'aride follie del viver mio? 

Aria 

Ah! fors'6 lui che l'anima 
Solinga ne' tumulti, 
Godea sovente pingere 
De suoi colori occulti ! 

Lui, che modesto e vigile 
AU'egre soglie ascese, 
Enuova febbre accese, 
Destandomi all'amor! 

A quell'amor, ch'e palpito 
Dell'universo intero, 
Misterioso, altero, 
Croce delizia al cor. 

Follie! Delirio vano & questo! Povera donna, 
sola, abbandonata in questo popoloso deserto che 
appellano Parigi, che spero or piu? che far 
degg'io? gioire! di voluttfl ne' vortici. 

Sempre libera degg'io 
Folleggiare di gioja in gioja, 
Vo' che scorra il viver mio 
Pei sentieri del piacer. 

Nasca il giorno muoja, 
Sempre lieta ne'ritrovi, 
A diletti sempre nuovi 
Dee volare il mio pensier! 



(Translation) 

Recitative 

Surprising! his words are all rooted in my 
bosom! Does it portend my sorrow, a deep 
affection? How determine, O heart on fire, and 
restless? Before, I rang'd in fancy's freedom, 
a transport, a new emotion, this interchange of 
spirits! Shall I throw such a treasure away 
for worldly baubles, for senseless pleasure? 

Aria 

Was this the man my fancy saw 
Oft in bright visions smiling. 
One formed to win a faithful heart, 
With a pure love beguiling? 

Is he the one who tended me 
When fever's rage was burning, 
And peace to me returning 
Kindled a true love's fire! 

Ah! 'tis the love that moves the spheres. 
Shines in the skies pure, by human tears oft 

reflected, 
Tyrant resistless, 'gainst him who is protected? 
Rapture and torment, pain and desire! 

What folly! Worse than vain this delusion! 
Most hapless woman, single, by all deserted, 
amid this solitude full of people, by all the 
world called Paris, what can I do? What my 
resource now ? Once more plunge in this vast 
sea of revelry, drink freely Circe's bowl! O joy! 

Shall I always freely ranging, 

Live for feigned joy, be pleasure greeting; 

In this life so quickly changing, 

Waste my time from year to year? 

Day by day, tho' the hours be fleeting, 
Brings new gladness for the morrow, 
Then hail pleasure, banish sorrow, 
And for sadness have naught to fear! 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



Eighth Season— 1931-1932 



Third Faculty Recital 



MR. HORATIO CONNELL, Baritone 

Florence Irons, Cecelia Thompson, Sopranos 

Virginia Kendrick, Irene Beamer, Contraltos 

Daniel Healy, Eugene Ramey, Tenors 

Walter Vassar, Alfred de Long, Baritones 

(Students of Mr. Connell) 

Lawrence Apgar, Organist 

(Student of Mr. Germani) 

Collaborating 



MR. HARRY KAUFMAN, at the Piano 



Casimir Hall 



Monday Evening, January 18, 1932 

at 8:30 o'doc\ 



The Steimway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



t? 



i. 



!" from "L' Allegro" ) 

_ . , „ „ , „ > George Frederic Handel 

: Light from "Semele" ) 

} 



"Haste Thee, Nymph! 1 
"Leave Me, Loathsome '. 

Rugiadose, odorose Alessandro Scarlatti 

In questa tomba oscura | Ludwig yAN Beethoven 

Der Kuss 



II. 



Fussreise 

Auf ein altes Bild 

Der Gartner 

Verborgenheit 

Trunken miissen wir alle sein 



.Hugo Wolf 



III. 

Bois Epais Jean Baptiste de Lully 

Bergere Legere Old French 

I Edward MacDowell 

A Maid Sings Light) 



Programme 



T? 



IV. 



The New Life, Opus 9 Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari 

Part I of a Cantata Based on a Text of Dante 

For many centuries, since it was written in 1300, Dante's unique book, 
said to be the history of his own love affair, called La Vita 7*{uova, or The 
"h[ew Life, has been the admiration of the literary world. It is not an 
unknown thing, in ordinary life, for an extremely young boy to cherish 
an extraordinary devotion for a young girl, and to preserve this love through 
life. This is what Dante writes as his own experience. He tells us that 
he saw Beatrice (the bestoweress of bliss) for the first time when he was 
nine years old and she a little younger, and from that moment a "New Life" 
opened to him. hence the name of the book. She spoke to him for the first 
time when she was 18 years old, giving him a modest greeting when she 
was in company with some of her companions. This brought on such an 
attack of love paroxysm that Dante was sick for a long time after. The 
book is full of rhapsody, thoroughly spiritual, entirely delicate, extravagantly 
romantic. To add music to such a story is a difficult task, because this 
devotion, amounting to adoration, is associated with a certain morbidity and 
intensity, so extravagant as to leave the lover occupied with only one 
thought. This is the story of Dante and Beatrice. 

The Cantata is divided into two parts, the first preceded by a Prologue, the 
second by an Intermezzo. The Prologue is a glorification of love. An 
angelic visitant (soprano) proclaims her coming as a missioner of love, 
while the poet, represented by the baritone soloist, indentifies the vision as 
a personification of the ideal, whose praises he must sing or die. 

This Part is divided between the solo baritone and solo chorus. The 
form is that of a ballata, the ballet of the old English composers, which 
consisted of a glee or a madrigal designed to inspire a dance. It paints the 
joy of Spring, the natural season for lovers. 

Dance of Angels. (Organ) "O'er the field and meadow merrily singing." A 
dance of angels, so gentle, so soft, that their fairy feet hardly seem to touch 
the earth. . 

Arioso and Sonneto. They really introduce the "New Life" and paint the 
concentrated, unhappy, never-ending devotion of the young and old man 
for this ideal of his, personified in Beatrice. 

The dance returns: an echo, as it were, that dies in the distance. (Organ) 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



Eighth Season— 1931-193 2 



CONCERT OF COMPOSITIONS 
by 
ERNEST ZECHIEL 



Casimir Hall 



Thursday Evening, January 21, 1932 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



TS 1 



Sonata in C minor For Violin and Piano 

Introduzione: grave e risoluto 
Allegro commodo 
Adagio cantabile 
Vivace, ma non troppo 

Played by 
Philip Frank, Violinist* 
Florence Frantz, Pianist^ 



II. 

Preludes For Organ 

"Jesu, Jesu, du bist mem" 
"Gieb dich zufrieden und sei stille" 
"Christ lag in Todesbanden" 
"Herr, ich habe missgehandelt" 
"Die Nacht ist kommen" 

Played by 
Lawrence Apgar, Organist% 



III. 

Quartette in E minor For Strings 

Allegro moderato ma appassionata 
Lento: tema e variazioni 
Allegro e allegretto 



Played by The Girls' Quartet§ 
Lily Matison )... ,. Virginia Majewski, Viola 

Frances Wiener ) Adine Barozzi, Violoncello 



* Student of Mr. Zimbalist 

f Student of Madame Venoerova 

% Student of Mr. Germani 

§ Students of Dr. Bailly in Chamber Music 



The Organ is an Aeolian 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Eighth Season— 193 149 32 



Fifth F. 



IFTH FACULTY 



[SS LUCILE LAWRENCE 
and 



MR. WILLIAM KINCAID, Flutist 

MR. MAX ARONOFF, Violiet 

Collaborating 



Casimir Hall 



Monday Evening, January 25, 1932 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 

I. 

Sonata Giovanni Battista Pescetti 

Al1 „ 1704-1766 

Allegro ma non presto 

Moderate 

Presto 

Embryo \ 

Hallucination (1917) \ Carlos Salzedo 

Whirlwind ) 

Mr. Salzedo 

II. 
Second Sonata Claude Debussy 

for flute, viola and harp 

Pastorale 
Interlude 
Final 

Mr. Kincaid Mr. Aronoff 

Mr. Salzedo 



III. 
Dances Claude Debussy 

for harp, with piano accompaniment 

Dance sacree 
Dance profane 

Miss Lawrence 
Mr. Salzedo at the piano 



IV. 

Four Preludes to the Afternoon of a Telephone (1921) .Carlos Salzedo 

for two harps 

Riverside 4937 
Audubon 530 
Prospect 7272 
Plaza 4570 

Miss Lawrence and Mr. Salzedo 



Miss Lawrence and Mr. Salzedo use Lyon & 1 Healy Harps exclusively 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



Eighth Season— 19314932 



Sixth Faculty Recital 

MADAME LEA LUBOSHUTZ, Violinist 

MR. HARRY KAUFMAN at tke Piano 

Casimir Hall 



Monday Evening, February 1, 1932 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



TT 



Sonata, No. 1, in G major JOHANNES BRAHMS 

Vivace ma non troppo 

Adagio 

Allegro molto moderate 



II. 

Chaconne (for violin alone) JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH 



III. 



Intrada Jean Antoine Desplanes 

Danse Espagnole de Falla-Kreisler 

"Nigun" from "Baal Shem" ERNEST BlocH 

Etude-Caprice Kreutzer-Kaufman 



IV. 



Concerto, No. 2, in D minor HENRI WlENIAWSKI 

Allegro moderato 

Romance: Andante ma non troppo 

Allegro con fuoco — Allegro moderato 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



Eighth Season— 19314932 



Seventh Faculty Recital 



MR. EFREM ZIMBALIST, Violinist 

HARRY KAUFMAN, at tke Piano 



Casimir Hall 



Monday Evening, February 15, 1932 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 
i. 

Concerto, No. 2, in E major JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro assai 

Concerto, No. L in D major NlCCOLO PAGANINI 

(in one movement) 

II. 

Partita, No. 2 Johann Sebastian Bach 

Allemande 

Courante 

Sarabande 

Gigue 

Chaconne 

III. 
Trois Morceaux Caracteristiques Paganini-Vogrich 

Chevalier Mousquetaire 
Danse des Ombres 
Dans les Bois 

Moto Perpetuo Niccolo Paganini 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Eighth Season— 19314932 



Eighth Faculty Recital 



MR. ABRAM CHASINS, Pianist 



Casimir Hall 



Tuesday Evening, February 23, 1932 

at 8:30 o'doc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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Programme 



I. 

Organ Fantasy and Fugue in G minor Bach 'Liszt 

Variations Serieuses Felix Mendelssohn 



II. 



Sonata in B flat minor, Opus 35 FREDERIC CHOPIN 

Grave — Doppio movimento 

Scherzo 

Marche funebre 

Presto 



III. 



East and West Michel Dvorsky 

The Quiet Hour Daniel Gregory Mason 

Standchen Strauss-Godowsky 

Liebesleid Kreisler-Rachmaninov 

Sonata in F sharp major, No. 4 ALEXANDRE ScRlABINE 

Andante 
Prestissimo volando 




The Curtis Institute of Music 



Eighth Season— 19314932 



/, uopramo 
MR. WILFRED PELLETIER, at tke Piano 



Casimir Hall 



Monday Evening, March 14, 1932 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



Ariette: "Dans un bois solitaire" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Aria: "S'ei non mi vuole amar" from "Tamerlano", 

George Frederic Handel 

Aria: "Patron, das macht der Wind" from "Phoebus und Pan", 

Johann Sebastian Bach 



II. 

Wie Melodien zieht es mir Johannes Brahms 

Lieber Schatz, sie wieder gut mir / Robert Franz 

Gute nacht! ) 

Wiegenlied Engelbert Humperdinck 

Schlechtes Wetter Richard Strmjss 



III. 

He Loved Me So Dearly? „ . „ . \ Peter I. Tschaikowsky 

All Is So Fair \ Sung m Russian ) Sergei Rachmaninov 

Das Veilchen Nikolai Medtner 



IV. 

Soupir Henri Duparc 

Voici que le printemps Claude Debussy 

Novembre Edouard Tremisot 

Ariette from "L'Enfant et les Sortileges" Maurice Ravel 

Tou jours Gabriel Faure 



V. 

May-Day Carol Deems Taylor 

A Piper Michael Head 

Slumber Song Edward MacDowell 

Ah, Love, but a Day! Mrs. H. H. A. Beach 




The Curtis Institute of Music 

Eighth Season— 19314932 



Tenth Faculty Recital 



Casimir Hall 



Monday Evening, April 4, 1932 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



i. 

From the "Java Suite" Leopold Godowsky 

Gamelan 

The Ruined Water Castle at Djokja 

Chattering Monkeys at the Sacred Lake of Wendit 

In the Kraton 

The Gardens of Buitenzorg 

In the Streets of Old Batavia 

The composer of the "Java Suite" has defined these compositions as "a musical 
portrayal ... a tonal description of the impressions and emotions awakened by 
interesting experiences in remote and strange places." The impressions of the 
native music'idioms do not seek to imitate or reproduce actual Javanese tunes, 
designs or harmonies save in one instance which does not appear on this 
programme. 

Gamelan 

"Native music, played by the Javanese on their indigenous instruments, is 
called Gamelan." The ensemble consists principally of instruments of percus- 
sion. "The sonority of the Gamelan is so weird, spectral, fantastic and bewitch- 
ing, the native music so vague and shimmering, so singular that the sense of 
reality is lost ... it conveys strongly the mysterious character of the island 
and its inhabitants." 

The Ruined Water Castle at Djokja 

". . . deserted, fallen into decay, stand the mouldy and crumbling remains of 
the once resplendent Water Palace, with its murmuring fountains and cascades, 
its aquatic pranks. . . . 

"Where once was merriment, there is now mystery and romance of vanished 
days. 

"The fountains and cascades hint at memories of other days — yearnings for 
past joys, mourning for departed love . . ." 

Chattering Monkeys at the Sacred Lake of Wendit 

"The Sacred Lake of Wendit is several miles distant from the attractive 
little city of Malang. In the woods, near the lake, we find ourselves in one of 
the numerous Simian colonies of Java, among the aborigines of the forest, 
enjoying an intimate view of their tribal life. On every side are jabbering 
monkeys, hundreds of them, jumping from tree to tree, running up and down 
the trunks and branches, while others, nearer the ground, are springing on and 
off the roofs of the small hotel and the bath houses, snatching bananas from 
the visitors. 

"The scene is full of humor, fun and animation." 

In the Kraton 

"In the heart of each capital is a vast enclosure called the Kraton, in which 
the potentate has his palaces and wherein dwell besides the Sultan, Sultana and 
princes and princesses, his numerous concubines, slaves and servants, court 
officials, nobles, musicians, actors, dancers, workmen, tradespeople and many 
individuals with indefinable occupations. Each Kraton has a population of 
between ten and fifteen thousand, the ensemble constituting a court of huge 
dimensions. 



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"It is evening. Quaint scenes charm our vision. Faint sounds of the entranc- 
ing Gamelan fill the fragrant air. The seemingly unreal reality casts a hypnotic 
spell over our consciousness. 

"There is poetry in every ebbing moment. 

"It is evening in the Orient. . . ." 

The Gardens of Buitenzorg 

"The finest collection of tropical trees, plants and flowers is to be found in the 
gardens of this distant corner of our Earth. The profusion, richness, magnificence 
and beauty of this strange horticultural world are unparalleled. 

"The fragrant frangipanis, the white tuberoses (the Malay call them 'The 
Charmers of the Night') and a bewildering number of other most delicately 
scented flowers intoxicate the senses. 

"The heavily perfumed air awakens an inexpressibly deep and painful yearn- 
ing for unknown worlds, for inaccessible ideals, for past happenings irrevocably 
gone — these memories which the ocean of time gradually submerges and finally 
buries in oblivion. . . 

"Why do certain scents produce unutterable regrets, insatiable longings, inde- 
finable desires?" 

In the Streets of Old Batavia 

"To stroll in the old streets of lower Batavia is an exhilarating experience. 
As we wander near the seashore, through the crowded bazaars and busy, narrow 
streets, many of which are intersected by bricked canals lined with weather- 
beaten buildings in the Dutch style, we meet exotic crowds, consisting mainly 
of Chinese, Arabs, natives and other Asiatics, interspersed with Europeans, of 
whom the Dutch form a large majority. 

"A ramble through the hectic Chinese quarter leads us to a quiet and con- 
templative corner of the Arab settlement. Another turn brings us to the native 
quarter. And when the bazaars are reached, a kaleidoscopic, multifarious con- 
glomeration of humans bewilders even the most seasoned globe-trotter." 

II. 

Triana (MS) Albeniz— Godowsky 

III. 

From Studies on Chopin's Etudes Leopold Godowsky 

Opus 25, No. 2 — F minor, First version (7^o. 26) 

Opus 10, No. 7 — C major, First version (7<[o. 14) — Toccata 

Opus 25, No. 1 — A flat major, Third version CHo. 25) 

Opus 25, No. 6 — G sharp minor, First version (H°- 36) 

Opus 25, No. 5 — E minor, First version (Ho. 33) 

Opus 10, No. 2 — A minor, Second version (Ho. 4) — Ignis Fatuus 

Opus 10, No. 5 and Opus 25, No. 9 combined — G flat major (Ho. 47) — 

Badinage 
Opus 10, No. 6 — E flat minor, for left hand alone CHo. 13) 

IV. 

Symphonic Metamorphoses on Themes from 

Artist-Life Waltz of Johann Strauss Leopold Godowsky 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Eighth Season— 1931-1932 



Eleventh Faculty Recital 



LOUIS BAILLY, Violisf 



MR. HARRY KAUFMAN, at tke Piano 



Casimir Hall 



Monday Evening, April 11, 1932 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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Programme 



t? 



i. 

Ballade, Opus 8 Leo Weiner 

II. 

Sonata in E flat major, Opus 120, No. 2 JOHANNES BRAHMS 

Allegro amabile 
Allegro appassionato 
Andante con moto — Allegro 

III. 

Concerto in A major, Opus 107 WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Rondo (Cadenza by Rosario Scalcro) 

IV. 
Ciaccona Tomaso Vitali 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



Eighth Season— 19314932 



Twelfth Faculty Recital 



, Organist 



Casimir Hall 



Monday Evening, April 18, 1932 

at 8:30 o'c\oc\ 



The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



T? 



I. 



Allegro from Concerto in G minor GEORGE FREDERIC HANDEL 

Chorale Prelude: "O Mensch bewein'' ) 

dein Siinde grosse ' Johann Sebastian Bach 

Prelude and Fugue in E minor (The Wedge) . ) 



II. 



Saetas Eduardo Torres 

Chorale in B minor Cesar Franck 

Variations de Concert Joseph Bonnet 



III. 



Fuge, Kanzona und Epilog Sigfrid Karg-Elert 

(For organ, violin and quartet of women's voices) 
The text for the Epilog is: "Credo in vitam venturi saeculi, Amen." 

JJack Pepper, Violinist 
*Margaret Codd? „ **Ruth Gordon, Mezzo-Soprano 

**Edna Corday > opranos |Virginia Kendrick, Contralto 



fStudent of Madame Fonaroff 
♦Student of Miss van Emden 
**Student of Madame Sembrich 
tStudent of Mr. Connell 



The organ is an Aeolian 




Concert 

by 

The Musical Art Quartet 

MR. SASCHA JACOBSEN, First Violin 

MR. PAUL BERNARD, Second Violin 

MR. LOUIS KAUFMAN, Viola 
MADAME MARIE ROEMAET-ROSANOFF, Violoncello 

and 

MR. JOSEF HOFMANN, Pianist 



Saturday Evening, January 9, 1932 



at 8.30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



I. 

Quartet in F Maurice Ravel 

Allegro moderato — Tres doux 
Assez vif — Tres rythme 
Tres lent 
Vif et agite 



II. 

Quintet in F minor, Opus 34 JOHANNES BRAHMS 

Allegro non troppo 

Andante, un poco adagio 

Scherzo: Allegro 

Finale: Poco sostenuto — Allegro non troppo 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 

Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

First Students' Concert 

Monday Evening, J^pvcmber 23, at 8.30 o*cloc\ 

Students of Madame Luboshutz 

*Eugene Helmer at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Partita in E minor BACH-SlLOTI 

Prelude: Maestoso 
Adagio ma non troppo 
Allemande 
Gigue 

Celia Gomberg 

II. 

Concerto in D major Serge Prokofieff 

Andantino-Andante assai 

Scherzo 

Moderate 

Ethel Stark 

III. 

Etchings Albert Spalding 

October Games 

Books Sunday Morning 

Professor Hurdy Gurdy 

Impatience Desert Twilight 

Dreams Fireflies 

Cinderella Ghosts 

Happiness 

James Bloom 

IV. 

Intrada Desplanes-Nachez 

Valse-Caprice Saint-Saens-Ysaye 

Celia Gomberg 

V. 

Carmen Fantaisie Bizet-Sarasate-Zimbalist 

Ethel Stark 

•Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season — 1931-1932 

Second Students' Concert 

Wednesday Evening, ?iovember 25, 193 1, at 8.30 o'clock 

Students of Mr. Bachmann 
*Vladimir Sokoloff at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Concerto, No 1 , in C major Joseph Haydn 

Allegro moderato 

Adagio 

Finale: Presto 

(Cadenza by Paul Klengel) 



Chaconne Johann Sebastian Bach 

Satyr and Dry; 
Valse Caprice 



Satyr and Dryadsj NXndor Zsolt 



LADISLAUS STEINHARDT 



II. 



Sonata in A minor PasqualpYsaye 

Largo — Ardito tempo moderato 
Minuetto: Molto moderato 
Presto giocosamente 

Concerto in A minor, Opus 8a Alexander Glazounoff 

Moderato — Andante — Allegro 
ABE BURG 

*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Eighth Season — 1 931 '1932. 

Graduation Recital 

of 
Katherine Conant, Violoncellist 

Student of Mr. Felix Salmond 
*Ralph Berkowitz at the Piano 

Third Students' Recital 

Casimir Hall 
Wednesday Evening, December 2, 193 1, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Seven Variations on a Theme by Mozart Ludwig van Beethoven 

First Movement from the Concerto in B flat major Luigi Boccherini 

Allegro moderato 

II. 

Sonata in E minor, Opus 38 JOHANNES BRAHMS 

Allegro non troppo 
Allegretto quasi Menuetto 
Allegro 

III. 

Third Movement from the Sonata in G minor, Opus 65 . . . . Frederic Chopin 

Largo 

Menuet Claude Debussy 

Prayer from "J ew i sn Life" Ernest Bloch 

Melodie Frank Bridge 

*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 

Eighth Season — 1931-1932 

Fourth Students 1 Concert 

Wednesday Evening, December 9, 193 1, at 8.30 o'clock 

Students of Mr. Meiff 
*Sigana Sornborger at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Concerto in D minor for Two Violins and Piano Johann Sebastian Bach 

Vivace 

Largo, ma non tanto 

Allegro 

Harold Kohon and Frederick Vogelgesang 

II. 

Romance in F major Ludwig van Beethoven 

Variations on a Theme by Corelli Tartini-Kreisler 

Perpetuum mobile Franz Ries 

Frederick Vogelgesang 

III. 

Poeme Ernest Chausson 

Charles Jaffe 

IV. 

Concerto No. 1, in D major Paganini-Wllhelmj 

Allegro maestoso 

Harold Kohon 

V. 

First Movement Hungarian Concerto in D minor, Opus n Joseph Joachim 

Allegro un poco maestoso 

Charles Jaffe 

*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Fifth Students' Concert 

Wednesday Evening, January 6, 1932, at 8:30 o'clock 

Students of Mr. Zimbalist 

*Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Concertante in A major for Four Violins LuDWIG MAURER 

Allegro 

Andante 

Allegro 

Jacob Brodsky, Philip Frank, Iso Briselli 
George Pepper 

II. 

Concerto No. 1, in D major Paganini-Wilhelmj 

Allegro maestoso 

George Pepper 

III. 

Scotch Fantasy Max Bruch 

Allegro 

Grave 

Andante sostenuto 

Allegro guerriero 

Philip Frank 

IV. 

Concerto in D major, Opus 19 Serge Prokofieff 

Andantino 
Scherzo: Vivacissimo 
Moderato 

Jacob Brodsky 
*Graduate student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 



The Steinway is the official piano of Thb Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season — iQ3i'iQ32 

Sixth Students' Concert 

Monday Evening, January n, 1932, at 8:30 o^do^ 
Students of Mr. Bachmann 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Sonata in E Major for Violin alone, Opus 27, No. 6 EuGENE YsAYE 

Allegro giusto 

Allegretto poco scherzando 

First Movement from the Concerto in D minor, Opus 27 . . ERNST VON DoHNANYI 
Molto moderato, maestoso e rubato 

Raphael Silverman 
*Bernard Frank at the Piano 

II. 

Suite in E major, Opus n Carl GoLDMARK 

Allegro 

Andante sostenuto 

Poeme Ernest Chausson 

Marian Head 
**Selma Frank at the Piano ' 

III. 

Sonata in A minor, Opus 105 ROBERT SCHUMANN 

Mit leidenschaftlichem Ausdruck 

Allegretto 

Lebhaft 

First Movement from the Concerto in B minor, Opus 61 Edward ElGAR 

Allegro 

Frances Wiener 
*Vladimir Sokoloff at the Piano 

*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
**Student of Madame Vengerova 

The Stbinway is the official piano of The Cuans Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Eighth Season — io3i'i932 

Graduation Recital 

of 

Carmela Ippolito, Violinist 
Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

*Theodore Saidenberg at the Piano 

Seventh Students' Recital 

Casimir Hall 
Wednesday Evening, January 27, 1932, at 8:30 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Concerto, No. 5, in A major Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Allegro aperto 

Adagio 

Tempo di Minuetto 

II. 

Symphonie Espagnole Edouard Lalo 

Allegro non troppo 
Andante 
Rondo: Allegro 

III. 

Poema autunnale Ottorino Respighi 

Danse, No. 2 Cyril Scott 

"Nigun" from "Baal Shem" Ernest Bloch 

Tarantella Karol Szymanowski 

*Graduate Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Stbinwat is the official piano of The Curtw Institute op Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Eighth Students' Concert 

Wednesday Evening, February 10, 1932, at 8.30 o'cloc\ 
Students of Mr. Salzedo and Miss Lawrence 

PROGRAMME 

I. 
Giga Arcangelo Corelli 

1653-1713 

Gavotte from "Iphigenia in Auks" WlLLIBALD CHRISTOPHER VON GLUCK 

1714-1787 

Rigaudon Jean-Philippe Rameau 

1683-1764 

Maryce Robert 

II. 

Chaconne A. Durand 

May Night Salem Palmgren 

Whirlwind Carlos Salzedo 

Isabel Ibach 

III. 

Quietude } 

Iridescence > Carlos Salzedo 

Introspection J 

Maryjane Mayhew 

IV. 

Introduction and Allegro Maurice Ravel 

(with piano accompaniment) 

Marjorie Tyre 
Carlos Salzedo at the Piano 

V. 

Sonata for Harp and Piano CARLOS SALZEDO 

Mary Griffith and the Composer 



Lyon and Healy Harps 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Ninth Students' Concert 

Tuesday Evening, March IS, 1932, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Madame Fonaroff 
*Florence Frantz at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Sonata in D major Vivaldi-Respighi 

Moderato 
Allegro moderato 
Largo 
Vivace 

Jack Pepper 

II. 

Concerto, No. 22, in A minor JEAN VlOTTI 

Moderato 
Adagio 
Agitato assai 

Harry Wolf 

III. 

Concerto, No. 3, in B minor CAMILLE SAINT'SAENS 

Allegro non troppo 
Andantino quasi allegretto 
Molto moderato e maestoso 

Avram Weiss 

IV. 

First Movement from the 

Concerto in B minor, Opus 61 EDWARD ELGAR 

Allegro 
Jack Pepper 



*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Tenth Students' Concert 

Wednesday Evening, "March 16, 1932, at 8:30 oc\oc\ 

Students of Mr. Zimbalist 
*Theodore Saidenberg, at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Sonata, No. 3, in G minor, GEORGE FREDERIC HaNDEL 

for Two Violins and Piano 

Larghetto 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro 
Felix Slatkin and Franklin Siegfried 

II. 

Grand Concerto in D minor, Opus 31 Henri Vieuxtemps 

Andante 
Adagio religioso 
Allegro 
Franklin Siegfried 

III. 
La Folia Corelli-Kreisler 

Sicilienne and Rigaudon Francoeur-Kreisler 

Felix Slatkin 

IV. 

Concerto Gregoriano Ottorino Respighi 

Andante tranquillo — Allegro molto moderato 
Andante espressivo e sostenuto 
Allegro energico 

Iso Briselli 



'Graduate Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Eleventh Students 1 Concert 

Tuesday Evening, March 22, 1932, at 8:30 o'clo^ 

Students of Miss van Emden 
*Joseph Rubanoff at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Shepherd! Thy Demeanour Vary Thomas Brown 

Le Nelumbo Ernest Moret 

L/oiseau bleu E. Jaques-Dalcroze 

Maria Wiegenlied Max Reger 

Aria: "Ach ich liebte"from "Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail" 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 
Margaret Codd 

II. 

"When Daisies Pied" Thomas Arne 

Aria: Dido's Lament from "Dido and ^neas" Henry Purcell 

"All mein Gedanken") Richard Strauss 

Zueignung ) 

Kathryn Dean 

III. 

"Agnus Dei" Georges Bizet 

An Chloe Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

The Siren Alexander Gretchaninoff 

Irene Singer 

IV. 

Scene and Aria: "Ah! perfido" Ludwig van Beethoven 

Pace li Diamond 

V. 

£P r t am x. r. t ^ng in Russian \ •••• ^ERGEI RACHMANINOFF 

Whether Day Dawns ) ( . . . . Peter I. Tschaikowsky 

Venez, agreable printemps. . .Old French arranged by J. B. Wekerlin 
Seguidilla: "Pres des remparts de Seville" from "Carmen" .Georges Bizet 

Irra Petina 

*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute op Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Twelfth Students' Concert 

'Wednesday Evening, March 23, 1932, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 
Students of Madame Vengerova 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Fantasia in C major George Frederic Handel 

Variations and Rondo alia Turca Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

from the Sonata, No. 12, in A major 
Intermezzo in B minor, Opus 4, No. 6 ROBERT SCHUMANN 

Valse-Impromptu Franz Liszt 

Sol Kaplan 

II. 

Prelude, Choral and Fugue Cesar Franck 

Clair de lune Claude Debussy 

Viennese Waltz, No. 2 Gartner-Friedman 

Selma Frank 

III. 

Sonata in F minor, Opus 57 (Appassionata) LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN 

Allegro assai 
Andante con moto 
Allegro ma non troppo 
Cecille Geschichter 

IV. 

Fantasia and Fugue in A minor Johann Sebastian Bach 

Ballade in A flat major, Opus 47 ) FREDERIC CHOPIN 

Etude in C minor, Opus 25, No. 12 ) 

Zadel Skolovsky 

V. 

First Movement from the Concerto Ludwig van Beethoven 

No. 5, in E flat major (The Emperor) 

Allegro 

Yvonne Krinsky 

(Orchestral part played on a second piano by Florence Frantz) 



The Steinwav is the official piano of The Curtis Institute op Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Thirteenth Students' Concert 

Thursday Evening, March 24, 1932, at 8:30 o'doc\ 
Students of Mr. Munz 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

First Movement from the Concerto, 

No. 4, in G major Opus 58 LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN 

Allegro moderato 

Joana Leschin 

(Orchestral part played on a second piano by *Bernard Frank) 

II. 

First Movement from the Concerto, 

No. 2, in F minor, Opus 21 FREDERIC CHOPIN 

Maestoso 

Blanche Brant 

(Orchestral part played on a second piano by * Bernard Frank) 

III. 

Intermezzo in E flat minor, Opus 118, No. 6 JOHANNES BRAHMS 

Etude in C sharp minor, Opus 42, No. 5 ) ALEXANDER SCRIABINE 

Etude in D flat major, Opus 8, No. 10 ) 

Polonaise in E major FRANZ LlSZT 

Louise Leschin 

IV. 

Nocturne in E major, Opus 62, No. 2 FREDERIC CHOPIN 

Liebesbotschaft ) Schubert-Liszt 

Der Lindenbaum ) 

Feux Follets Franz Liszt 

Ezra Rachlin 

*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Graduation Recital 

of 

Lily Matison, Violinist 

Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 

*Vladimir Sokoloff at the Piano 

Fourteenth Students' Recital 

Casimir Hall 
Tuesday Evening, April 5, 1932, at 8:30 o'chcX 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Prelude and Fugue 

in B minor, Opus 117, No. 1, for Violin alone MAX ReGER 

II. 

Sonata, No. 1, in G major, Opus 78 JOHANNES BRAHMS 

Vivace ma non troppo 

Adagio 

Allegro molto moderato 

*Florence Frantz at the Piano 

III. 
Nocturne : "Complaint" Josef Hofmann 

^ ont , afie ^ . ) Nin-Kochanski 

JTonada Murciana J 

Cinq Pieces Alexandre Tansman 

Toccata 

Chanson et boite a musique 

Mouvement perpetuel 

Aria 

Basso ostinato 

IV. 
Concerto in E minor Jules Conus 

Allegro molto — Andante espressivo — Allegro subito 
*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute op Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Fifteenth Students 1 Concert 

Wednesday Evening, April 6, 1932 
at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Mr. Salzedo and Miss Lawrence 

Concert of Music for Eleven Harps 
in Orchestral Formation 

Victoria Murdock 
Soloist 

Marjorie Call Mary Griffith Reva Reatha 

Reinhardt Elster Isabel Ibach Maryce Robert 

Eleanor England Marcia Johnstone Marjorie Tyre 

Maryjane Mayhew 

Conducted by Carlos Salzedo 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Gavotte, from "Le Temple de la Gloire" JEAN-PHILIPPE PvAMEAU 

16834764 

Pavane Unknown Composer 

XVI Century 

Gavotte of the Little Sheep Padre Giambattista Martini 

1706-1784 
Sarabande Francois Couperin 

1668-1733 
La Joyeuse Jean-Philippe Rameau 

The Ensemble 

II. 

Cinq petits preludes intimes Carlos Salzedo 

(1919) 

tenderly emoted 
dreamingly 
profoundly peaceful 
in self 'communion 
procession-li\e 
The Ensemble 

III. 

Four Poetical Studies for Harp Solo Carlos Salzedo 

(1918) 
Flight 

Idyllic Poem 
Mirage 
Communion 
Victoria Murdock 

IV. 

Fraicheur ) Carlos Salzedo 

Lamentation ) (1917) 

The Ensemble 

Lyon & Healy Harps 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Sixteenth Students' Concert 

Friday Evening, April 15, 1932, at 8:30 oc\oc\ 
Students of Mr. Saperton 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Prelude, Aria et Finale Cesar Franck 

Jean-Marie Robinault 

II. 

Sonata in F minor, Opus 57 (Appassionata) LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN 

Allegro assai 
Andante con moto 
Allegro ma non troppo 
Jorge Bolet 

III. 

Intermezzo in A major, Opus 118. No. 2 \ J 0HANNES B RAHMS 

LapriCClO, Opus 76, No. 1 from Klavierstucke J 

Richard Goodman 

IV. 

Islamey: Oriental Fantasy Mily Balakireff 

Jean-Marie Robinault 

V. 

Poissons d'or ) 

Reflets dans Teau \ Claude Debussy 

L/isle joyeuse ) 

Richard Goodman 

VI. 

Menuett in A minor RaMEAU-GodOWSKY 

Etude in A flat major, Opus 1, No. 2 PAUL DE SCHLoZER 

Jorge Bolet 

VII. 

First Movement from the Concerto, Sergei Rachmaninoff 

No. 2, in C minor 

Moderato 
Richard Goodman 

(Orchestral part played on a second piano by Jorge Bolet) 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute op Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 193M932 



Tuesday Evening, April 19, 1932, at 8.30 o'c\oc\ 
Students of Mr. Meiff 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Sonata in A minor FRANCESCO VERACINI 

Preludio 
Allemanda 
Grave — Allegro vivo 
Charles Jaffe 
*Sigana Sornborger at the Piano 

II. 

Concerto in E minor JULES CONUS 

Allegro molto — Adagio — Allegro Subito 

(Cadenza by Albert Meiff) 

Frank Gasparro 
*Bernard Frank at the Piano 

III. 

Romance Wagner-Wilhelm j 

Allegretto Porpora-Kreisler 

Caprice, No. 20 Paganini-Kreisler 

Frederick Vogelgesang 
*Bernard Frank at the Piano 

IV. 

Concerto, No. 3, in G minor JENO HuBAY 

Introduction quasi Fantasia 

Scherzo 

Adagio 

Finale 

(Cadenza by Albert Meiff) 

Nathan Snader 
*Bernard Frank at the Piano 

V. 

Havanaise Camille Saint-Saens 

Tzigane Maurice Ravel 

Charles Jaffe 
*Sigana Sornborger at the Piano 

* Student of Mr. Kaufman in accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 



Eighteenth Students' Concert 



Students of 
MR. CONNELL 



Monday Evening, April 25, 1932 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Programme 



"Denn es gehet dem Menchen") 
"O Tod, wie bitter bist du 11 j 



I 
(Vier ernste Gesange)- JOHANNES BRAHMS 



"Largo al factotum della citta" ) Gioacchino Rossini 

from "II Barbiere di Siviglia ' j 

Walter Vassar, Baritone 
*Vladimir Sokoloff, at the Piano 

II 

"O sleep, why dost thou leave me?" 



. . George Frederic Handel 

from bemele 

Ungeduld Franz Schubert 

Adelaide Ludwig van Beethoven 

"Meine liebe ist grim" Johannes Brahms 

Albert Mahler, Tenor 
*Vladimir Sokoloff, at the Piano 

III 

"L 1 Heure de Pourpre" Augusta Holmes 

"Der Schmied 1, Johannes Brahms 

When I bring to you colour'd toys John Alden Carpenter 

Arioso from "La Mort de Jeanne d'Arc" Hermann Bemberg 

Irene Beamer, Mezzo-contralto 
* Sarah Lewis, at the Piano 

IV 

"Ah, poor heart" from "Orfeo'" Joseph Haydn 

Ich trage meine Minne Richard Strauss 

E tanto c 1 e pericol E. Wolf-Ferrari 

Hear me! Ye Winds and Waves from "Scipio,''' 

George Frederic Handel 

Alfred de Long, Bass-Baritone 
*Vladimir Sokoloff, at the Piano 



Programme 



v 

Recitative :-"God Created Man" ) Jos£pH Haydn 

Ana: — "In Native Worth" ) 

from "Creation" 

Die Mainacht \ 

Minnelied > Johannes Brahms 

Roslein Dreie ; 

Daniel Healy, Tenor 
* Sarah Lewis, at the Piano 



VI 

Liebestreu Johannes Brahms 

La Girometta Old Italian, Arranged by Gabriele Sibella 

"O, don fatale" from "Don Carlo" GlUSEPPE VERDI 

La Ballade du Desespere Hermann Bemberg 

For Contralto, Death; and Reader, Poet; accompanied by Violin, Violon' 
cello and Piano 

Alfred de Long, **Jacob Brodsky, ***Ho\vard Mitchell 
Virginia Kendrick, Contralto 
* Sarah Lewis, at the Piano 

VII 

Oh! quand je dors Franz Liszt 

Feldeinsamkeit Johannes Brahms 

Songs of Grusia Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Violoncello obligato by Howard Mitchell*** 

Fleur jetee Gabriel Faure 

Eugene Ramey, Tenor 
*Vladimir Sokoloff, at the Piano 

*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
**Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 
***Student of Mr. Felix Salmond 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 19314932 

Nineteenth Students' Concert 



Students of 
MR. DE GOGORZA 

Miss Winslow, at the Piano 



Wednesday Evening, April 27, 1932 

at 8:30 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



<i=p 



i 

'Darum Sollt Ihr Nicht Sorgen" Johann Sebastian Bach 

from "Es wartet Alles auf dich" 

Benjamin de Loache, Baritone 
*Joseph Rubanoff, at the Piano 



II 

Aria : "Improwiso di Chenier" Umberto Giordano 

from "Andrea Chenier" 

Fiorenzo Tasso, Tenor 



III 

"Shepherd! Thy Demeanour Vary" Old English 

'The Rose and the Nightingale 11 Nicholas Rimsky-Korsakoff 

Violin obligato by **James Bloom 

Villanelle Eva Dell'Acqua 

Carol Deis, Soprano 

IV 

Duet: "Solenne in quest'ora giurarmi dovete" Giuseppe Verdi 

from "La Forza del Destino" 

Fiorenzo Tasso, Tenor 
Conrad Thibault, Baritone 

V 

"Credo" from "Otello" Giuseppe Verdi 

The Seminarian Modeste Moussorgsky 

Abrasha Robofsky, Baritone 

VI 

Aria: "O patria mia" from "Aida" Giuseppe Verdi 

A Spirit Flower Louis Campbell-Tipton 

"Me Company Along" Richard Hageman 

Agnes Davis, Soprano 
*Joseph Rubanoff, at the Piano 



Programme 

<^ 

VII 

"Comfort Ye, My People" George Frederic Handel 

from "The Messiah" 

Stornellatrice Ottorino Respighi 

Chanson Norvegienne Felix Fourdrain 

"Donna non vidi maffrom "Manon Lescaut". Giacomo Puccini 

Edward Kane, Tenor 

VIII 

"Invocazione di Orfeo" from "Buddice" Jacopo Peri 

Die Nebensonnen Franz Schubert 

"Christ Went up into the Hills" Richard Hageman 

Gwine to HebtTn Jacques Wolfe 

Benjamin de Loache, Baritone 
*Joseph Rubanoff, at the Piano 

IX 

Duet : The Tomb Scene from "Alda" Giuseppe Verdi 

Agnes Davis, Soprano 

Fiorenzo Tasso, Tenor 

*Joseph Rubanoff, at the Piano 

X 

Dein Angesicht, so lieb und schon j 

Wanderlied / Robert Schumann 

Novembre Edouard Tremisot 

Fleur jetee Gabriel Faure 

Miniver Cheevy Wintter Watts 

Conrad Thibault, Baritone 
*Joseph Rubanoff, at the Piano 

XI 

Quartet : "Bella figlia deH'amore" from "Rigoletto" Giuseppe Verdi 

Carol Deis, Soprano Edward Kane, Tenor 

Ruth Carhart, Contralto Abrasha Robofsky, Baritone 

♦Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanyinn 
**Student of Madame Lea Luboshutz 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Twentieth Students' Concert 

Friday Evening, April 29, 1932, at 8:30 o'clock 

Students of 
Dr. Bailly in Viola and Chamber Music 

*Eugene Helmer, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I 
Sonata Rebecca Clarke 

Impetuoso 
Vivace 

Adagio — Allegro 
Leonard Mogill, Viola 

II 

Sonata in F minor, Opus 120, No. 1 JOHANNES BRAHMS 

Allegro appassionato 

Andante un poco adagio 

Allegretto grazioso 

Vivace 

Virginia Majewski, Viola 

III 

Suite for Viola and Orchestra, Opus 48 JOSEPH JONGEN 

(Piano version by the composer) 

Poeme Elegiaque 
Final 
Max Aronoff, Viola 

IV 

Quartet in C minor, Opus 15, GABRIEL FaURE 

for Piano, Violin, Viola and Violoncello 

Allegro molto moderato 

Scherzo: Allegro vivo 

Adagio 

Allegro molto 
Yvonne Krinsky, Piano Leonard Mogill, Viola 
Philip Frank, Violin Samuel Geschichter, Violoncello 

•Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 193M932 



TWENTY-FIRST STUDENTS' CONCERT 



Students of 
MR. TABUTEAU IN WIND ENSEMBLE 



Tuesday Evening, May 3, 1932 

at 830 o'cloc\ 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



<r* 



n . (Opus 71, for Flute, Oboe, ( 

^ ' / Clarinet, Bassoon and Horn ) 



. Ludwig van Beethoven 



John Hreachmack, Flute 

ISADORE GOLDBLUM, Oboe 



James Collis, Clarinet 
William Santucci, Bassoon 



Theodore Seder, Horn 



II. 



Sonata in C minor, for Oboe and Piano GEORGE FREDERIC HANDEL 

Rhadames Angelucci, Oboe 
Joseph Rubanoff, Piano 



III. 

Les Petits Moulins a Vent Couperin-Setaccioli 

for Flute, Oboe and Bassoon 



Kenton Terry, Flute 



Isadore Goldblum, Oboe 



William Santucci, Bassoon 



IV. 



Allegro Scherzoso i° pus 92 ' for Two Flutes ' f L- Hughes 

' / Oboe, Clarinet and Bassoon ) 
r Flutes 



Joseph Mariano 
Kenton Terry 



Isadore Goldblum, Oboe 
Robert Hartman, Clarinet 
William Santucci, Bassoon 



Programme 



<rs 



Aubade for Flute, Oboe and Clarinet, PAUL De WaILLY 



Joseph Mariano, Flute 



ISADORE GOLDBLUM, Oboe 



Robert Hartman, Clarinet 



VI. 

Double Quintet, Opus 54, for Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, FlORENT SCHMITT 

English Horn, Two Clarinets, Two Bassoons and Two Horns 



Emil Opava, Flute James Collis 

John Hreachmack, Piccolo Emil Schmachtenberg 

Isadore Goldblum, Oboe William Santucci 

Robert Hester, English Horn William Koch 
Theodore Seder / 
Sune Johnson } Horns 



Clarinets 



Bassoons 



VII. 

Concerto in G minor, for Oboe and Piano GEORGE FREDERIC HANDEL 

Harold Goldblum, Oboe Joseph Rubanoff, Piano 



VIII. 

Sinfonietta, Opus 48, for Flute, Oboe, Two Clarinets, 
Two Bassoons and Two Horns 



.Rudolf Novacek 



John Hreachmack, Flute 
Isadore Goldblum, Oboe 
James Collis ) 
Leon Lester ) 



Clarinets 



William Santucci 
William Koch 
Harry Berv 
Attillio de Palma 



Bassot 



I He 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Twenty-Second Students 1 Concert 

Students of Dr. Bailly in Chamber Music 
'Wednesday Evening, May 4, 1932, at 8.30 o'doc\ 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

String Quartet in F major, Opus 96 Anton Dvorak 

Allegro ma non troppo 

Lento 

Molto vivace 

Finale: Vivace ma non troppo 

Celia Gomberg [ Virginia Majewski, Viola 

Eva Stark J Violins Helen Gilbert, Violoncello 

II. 

String Quartet in E flat major, Opus 74 LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN 

(Harfenquartett) 

Poco adagio: Allegro 

Adagio ma non troppo 

Presto 

Allegretto con variazioni 

Lily Matison ) Virginia Majewski, Viola 

Frances Wiener ) Adine Barozzi, Violoncello 

III. 

Trio for Piano, Violin and Violoncello MAURICE RAVEL 

Modere 

Pantoum: Assez vif 
Passacaille 
Finale: Anime 

Jennie Robinor, Piano 
Carmela Ippolito, Violin Howard Mitchell, Violoncello 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute oj Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

Twenty-Third Students' Concert 

Thursday Evening, May 5, 1932, at 8.30 o'cloc\ 
Students of Mr. Saperton 

PROGRAMME 
I. 

Sonata in C minor, Opus 13 (Pathetique) LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN 

Grave — Allegro di molto e con brio 
Adagio cantabile 
Rondo: Allegro 

Florence Fraser 

II. 

Ballade in F major, Opus 38 FREDERIC CHOPIN 

Irene Peckham 

III. 

Prelude and Fugue in E minor, Opus 3 5 FELIX MENDELSSOHN 

ROSITA ESCALONA 

IV. 

Impromptu in F sharp major, Opus 36 FREDERIC CHOPIN 

Florence Fraser 

V. 

Sonata in D major DOMENICO SCARLATTI 

Nocturne in C sharp minor, Opus 27, No. 1 FREDERIC CHOPIN 

Habanera Claude Debussy 

ROSITA ESCALONA 

VI. 

Toccata, Opus 7 Robert Schumann 

Irene Peckham 

VII. 

Nocturne in F minor, Opus 55, No. 1 \ 

Etude in G sharp minor, Opus 25, No. 6 I FREDERIC CHOPIN 

Etude in E major, Opus 10, No. 3 < 

Etude in C major, Opus 10, No. 7 J 

Jeanette Weinstein 

VIII. 

Concert Arabesques on the Blue Danube Waltz 

Strauss-Schulz-Evler 
Jeanette Weinstein 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Eighth Season— 1931-1932 



of 

Orlando Cole, Violoncellist 
Student of Mr. Felix Salmond 

*Ralph Berkowitz at the Piano 



Casimir Hall 
'Wednesday Evening, May 11, 1932, at 8.30 o'cloc\ 

PROGRAMME 

I. 

Adagio and Allegro Luigi Boccherini 

II. 

Sonata in B flat minor, Opus 8 ERNST VON DOHNANYI 

Allegro ma non troppo 

Scherzo 

Adagio non troppo 

Allegro moderato 

III. 

Adagio Johann Sebastian Bach 

Villanelle Pianelli-Salmon 

Vivace Senaille-Salmon 

Grave and Courante Eccles-Salmon 

IV. 

Variations on a Rococo Theme Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky 

* Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 



Eighth Season— 1931-1932 



TWENTY-FIFTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 



Students of 
Mr. Scalero in Composition 



Thursday Evening, May 12, 1932 

at 8.30 o'clock 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



i. 

Double Fugue in G minor for Organ { HARLOW MlLLS 

Five Voice Fugue in G major for Organ ) 

Donald Wilcox 
Student of Mr. Germani 

II. 

Three Choral Preludes for Organ Roland Leich 

(a) Jesu suss (b) Schaffs mit mir Gott nacht deinen Willen 

(c) Der Tag mit seinen Lichte 

Paul Robinson 
Student of Mr. Germani 

III. 

Four Canons for Three Women's Voices NlNO ROTA 

(a) La non vuol esser piu mia. .(A. Poliziano XV Century) 

(b) Al suo dolce guardare (M. Bojardo XV Century) 

(c) Misero cor! (A. Poliziano) 

(d) Benedetto sia il giorno (A. Poliziano) 

Marie Buddy, Soprano Agnes Davis, Soprano 

Student in Operatic Acting Student of Mr. de Gogorza 

Helen Watlington, Soprano 
Student of Madame Mario 

IV. 
Variations and Fugue Gian-Carlo Menotti 

for String Quartet on an Unpublished Theme of Antonio Caldara 
(XVIII Century) 

Iames Bloom | u . ,, Arthur Granick, Viola 

J } Violins _ _, , ,. . „ 

Frances Wiener ) Samuel Geschichter, Violoncello 

Students of Dr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

V. 

Two Intermezzi for Piano Samuel Barber 

Played by the Composer 

VI. 

Variations and Finale for Piano Jeanne Behrend 

Played by the Composer 
Graduate Student of Mr. Hofmann 



Programme 

VII. 

"Dover Beach" for String Quartet and Voice SAMUEL BARBER 

DOVER BEACH 

The sea is calm to-night 

The tide is full, the moon lies fair 

Upon the straits: — on the French coast the light 

Gleams and is gone: the cliffs of England stand, 

Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay. 

Come to the window, sweet is the night-air! 

Only, from the long line of spray 

Where the sea meets the moon-blanch'd land, 

Listen! you hear the grating roar 

Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling. 

At their return, up the high strand. 

Begin, and cease, and then again begin, 

With tremulous cadence slow, and bring 

The eternal note of sadness in. 

Sophocles long ago 

Heard it on the ^gaean, and it brought 

Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow 

Of human misery: we 

Find also in the sound a thought. 

Hearing it by this distant northern sea. 

The Sea of Faith 

Was once, too, at the full, and round earth's shore 

Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furl'd. 

But now I only hear 

Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar, 

Retreating, to the breath 

Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear 

And naked shingles of the world. 

Ah, love, let us be true 

To one another! for the world, which seems 

To lie before us like a land of dreams. 

So various, so beautiful, so new, 

Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light. 

Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain: 

And we are here as on a darkling plain 

Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight, 

Where ignorant armies clash by night. 

— Matthew Arnold 

James Bloom ) Arthur Granick. Viola 

Frances Wiener ) Vioins Samufl Geschichter, Violoncello 

Students of Dr. Bailly in Chamber Music 

Rose Bampton. Contralto 

Student of Madame Mario 



The organ is an Aeolian 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 



CASIMIR HALL 



Eighth Season— 1931-1932 



TWENTY-SIXTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 



Students of 
MADAME MARIO 

Sylvan Levin, at the Piano 



Monday Evening, May 16, 1932 

at 8:30 o'clock 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 



T? 

I 

"O Sleep, Why Dost Thou Leave Me? 11 George Frederic Handel 

from "Semele" 

Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer Johannes Brahms 

Der bescheidene Schafer ) . , 

Marienlied \ J 0SEPH Marx 

Come Away, Death Roger Quilter 

Schlechtes Wetter Richard Strauss 

Helen Watlington, Soprano 

II 

The Letter Scene from "Eugen Onegin" . . . Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky 

Che fiero costume Giovanni Legrenzi 

Am Sonntag Morgen Johannes Brahms 

Te Souviens-tu? Benjamin Godard 

Aria of Pauline from "La Dame de Pique". . PETER ILJITCH TSCHAIKOWSKY 

These Heavenly Nights Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Vera Resnikoff, Soprano 

III 

Duet: "Nuit d'Hymeneer" from "Romeo et Juliette". . .Charles Gounod 
Helen Watlington, Soprano, and *Edward Kane, Tenor 

IV 

"Soul and Body" from Cantata, No. 3? JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH 

Der Tod, das ist die Kiihle Nacht Richard Strauss 

Serenade Charles Loeffler 

Viola obbligato played by **Virginia Majewski 

A Song for Lovers Deems Taylor 

Aria: "Bel raggio lusinghier" from "Semiramide". . . .Gioacchino Rossini 
Rose Bampton, Contralto 

V 

"Allel^Y' from "Exsultate, Jubilate" WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART 

Wie Einst Joseph Marx 

Nimmersatte Liebe Hugo Wolf 

Here Beauty Dwells Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Stornellata marinara Pietro Cimara 

Tell Me, Oh Blue, Blue Sky! Vittorio Giannini 

Aria : "Addio, terra nativa" from "L*Africaine". . . . Giacomo Meyerbeer 
Henriette Horle, Soprano 

VI 

Duet: "Gia i sacerdoti adunansi" from "Aida" Giuseppe Verdi 

Rose Bampton, Contralto, and *Fiorenzo Tasso, Tenor 

* Student of Mr. de Gogorza 
** Student of Dr. Bailly 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

TWENTY-SEVENTH STUDENTS 1 CONCERT 

'Wednesday Evening, May 18, 1932, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Mr. Salmond 
*Ralph Berkowitz at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Sonata in D minor ARCANGELO CORELLI 

Preludio: Largo 
Allemanda: Allegro 
Sarabanda: Largo 
Giga: Allegro 
Samuel Mayes 

II 

Two Movements from the Concerto, No. 1, in D minor. . . . EDOUARD LALO 
Intermezzo 

Lento — Allegro maestoso 
Howard Mitchell 

III 

Two Movements from the Concerto in B flat major. . . .LuiGI BOCCHERINI 

Adagio 

Allegro moderato 
Victor Gottlieb 

IV 

Three Movements from the Sonata in F major, Opus 99 . . Johannes Brahms 

Allegro vivace 
Adagio affettuoso 
Allegro passionato 
Frank Miller 

V 

Two Movements from the Concerto in B minor, Opus 104 . . . ANTON DVORAK 
Adagio ma non troppo 
Allegro 

Helen Gilbert 

*Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

CASIMIR HALL 
Eighth Season— 1931-1932 

TWENTY-EIGHTH STUDENTS' CONCERT 

Monday Evening, May 23, 1932, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

Students of Madame Sembrich 
Sylvan Levin at the Piano 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Spirate pur, spirate Stefano Donaudy 

Aria : "Non so piu cosa son, cosa faccio" . . Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

from "Le Nozze di Figaro" 

L/heure silencieuse Victor Staub 

Lithuanian Song Frederic Chopin 

Summer Cecile Chaminade 

Call Me No More Charles Wakefield Cadman 

*Edna Corday, Soprano 

II 

Tu lo sai Giuseppe Torelli 

Lachen und Weinen Franz Schubert 

Verborgenheit Hugo Wolf 

Hans und Grethe Gustav Mahler 

Sea-Shell Carl Engel 

Aria: "Adieu, forets^from "Jeanne d'Arc" Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky 
Ruth Gordon, Contralto 

III 

Ach, wende diesen Blickj Johannes Brahms 

Ich muss hinaus ) 

At the Ball Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky 

Seguidille Manuel de Falla 

Aria: "La mamma moIta ,, from "Andrea Chenier" . .Umberto Giordano 
**Marie Edel, Soprano 

IV 

Qual farfalletta amante Domenico Scarlatti 

Nina Giovanni Pergolesi 

Wie sollten wir geheim sie halten Richard Strauss 

Selige Nacht Joseph Marx 

Slumber Song Alexander Gretchaninoff 

Aria : "Leise, leise" from "Der Freischutz" Carl Maria von Weber 

Mildred Cable, Dramatic Soprano 

* Graduate Student of Madame Sembrich 
** Student in Operatic Acting 

The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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The Curtis Institute of Music 

Eighth Season— 19314932 



Of 

Paul Gershman, Violinist 
Student of Mr. Zimbalist 

*Theodore Saidenberg, at the Piano 

TWENTY-NINTH STUDENTS' RECITAL 

Casimir Hall 

Tuesday Evening, May 24, 1932, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

PROGRAMME 

I 

Sonata, No. 2, in E major GEORGE FREDERIC HANDEL 

Adagio cantabile 

Allegro 

Largo 

Allegro non troppo 

II 

Concerto in D minor, Opus 47 JEAN SlBELIUS 

Allegro moderato 
Adagio di molto 
Allegro, ma non tanto 

III 

Concerto in G minor, Opus 99 JENO HlJBAY 

Moderato 

Scherzo: Presto 

Adagio 

Finale: Allegro con fuoco 

* Graduate Student of Mr. Kaufman in Accompanying 
The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute o/ Music 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

Eighth Season— 19314932 

Graduation Recital 

of 

Florence Frantz, Pianist 
Student of Madame Vengerova 

Thirtieth Students' Recital 

Casimir Hall 
'Wednesday Evening, May 25, 1932, at 8:30 o'cloc\ 

PROGRAMME 
I 

Sonata in A flat major, Opus 110 LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN 

Moderato cantabile molto espressivo 

Allegro molto 

Adagio, ma non troppo 

Fuga: Allegro, ma non troppo 

II 

Carnaval Robert Schumann 

Preambule Chiarina 

Pierrot Chopin 

Arlequin Estrella 

Valse noble Reconnaissance 

Eusebius Pantalon et Colombine 

Florestan Valse allemande 

Coquette Paganini 

Replique_ Ik^.^ Aveu 

Papillons Promenade 

Lettres dansantes Pause 
Marche des Davidsbundler contre les Philistins 

III 

Intermezzo, Opus 34 Josef Hofmann 

Fairy Tale in E minor Nicolai Medtner 

Toccata Maurice Ravel 

Ballet Music from "Rosamunde" SCHUBERT-GODOWSKY 

Danza Fantastica, No. 3 Joaquin Turina 

IV 

La fille aux cheveux de lin Claude Debussy 

Mephisto Valse Franz Liszt 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



THE PHILADELPHIA FORUM 

presents 

THE CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

in concert 

FRITZ REINER, Conductor 

assisted by 

ISO BRISELLI, Violin 
MAX ARONOFF, Viola 

, e^a 1 

THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC 
Wednesday Evening, December 16, 1931, at 8.30 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Programme 

CARL MARIA VON WEBER Overture to "Oberon" 

BACH— PICK-MANGIAGALLI Two Preludes 

for String Orchestra 

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART. . .Symphonie Concertante 

for Violin and Viola 
Allegro maestoso 
Andante 

Presto 

ISO BRISELLI 
MAX ARONOFF 



Int 



ermission 



JOHANNES BRAHMS Symphony No. 4 in E Minor 

Allegro non troppo 

Andante moderato 

Allegro giocoso 

Allegro energetico e passionato 



PROGRAMME NOTES 
by CHARLES DEMAREST 

Overture to "Oberon" Carl Maria von Weber 

Although this overture was written over one hundred years ago, 
it still retains for our modern ears a naive vigor and freshness. All 
thematic material found in the overture comes from the opera itself, 
from the introductory horn call to the brilliant coda derived from the 
aria "Ocean! Thou Mighty Monster." 

The slow introduction is indicative of the supernatural element 
pervading the opera, the call of Oberon's horn when misfortunes are 
about to inundate Huon and his faithful servant, the flutter of elfin 
wings, the instantaneous transportation of Huon and Sherasmin from 
the Court of Charlemagne to Bagdad. Then, after a sudden crash, the 
serious business of the opera is outlined — the tale of the brave Huon, 
who at the bidding of Charlemagne, slew him who sat at the left of the 
Caliph of Bagdad and thereby won the lovely Rezia. 



Two Preludes by Johann Sebastian Bach, arranged for string or- 
chestra by Kiccardo Pick-Man giagalli. 

The first of these preludes is the restrained and intense D minor 
Organ Prelude which Pick-Mangiagalli has rewritten in E minor for 
string orchestra without changing the musical content. The second 
prelude is the famous one of the third Partita for violin unaccompanied. 
To this prelude, written for violin alone, the arranger has added a 
brilliant contrapuntal accompaniment played by the second violins, violas, 
celli, and basses, while all the first violins play the original violin part 
in unison. 



Symphorie Concertante for Violin, Viola, and Orchestra, 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

This graceful work is really a symphony for orchestra with two 
solo instruments. Although the exact date of its creation is unknown, 
it was written before Mozart's twenty-fourth year. It is scored for two 
oboes, two horns, and strings, and is written in three movements; the 
first, Allegro Maestoso, is in sonata form, beginning with a long 
orchestral exposition; the second, Andante, is an expressive romanza- 
like movement; the third, Presto, is a deftly-written and dashing finale. 



Symphony No. 4 in E Minor Opus 98 Johannes Brahms 

Countless pages have been written about this last symphony of 
Brahms, composed in 1884 and 1885 after his fiftieth year. Max 
Kalbeck found in it "a reflection of downcast hours induced by the 
melancholy of antique tragedy." However, the symphony is not uni- 
formly brooding and sombre; it has many bright moments, as in the 
scherzo. But words are idle things in describing our human emotions 
when roused by an epic work of this calibre. The last movement of 
the symphony is in reality a passacaglia with thirty-eight variations, 
but only the most learned, dry-as-dust scholar would care to analyze 
the movement when listening to its performance; most humans would 
be absorbed in its variety and wealth of rich sounds and emotions. 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



THE PHILADELPHIA FORUM 

ROLAND S. MORRIS, President 

WILLIAM CURTIS BOK, Vice-President 

Real Estate-Land Title and Trust Company, Treasurer 

WILLIAM K. HUFF, Executive Director 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



Richard L. Austin 
Charles E. Beury 
Mrs. Edward W. Biddle 
William Curtis Bok 
Mrs. William T. Elliott 
Mrs. L. Webster Fox 
Clarence Gardner 
Joseph H. Hagedorn 

Thomas 



Raebi 



Arthur H. Lea 
William J. Montgomery 
Roland S. Morris 
George W. Norris 
Samuel B. Scott 
Alfred Stengel 
S. Burns Weston 
S. P. Wetherill, Jr. 
While 



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The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 
Fritz Reiner, Conductor 

CARNEGIE HALL 

NEW YORK 



Friday Evening, January 29, 1932 
at 8:45 o'clocX 



PROGRAMME 

Overture to "OberorT Carl Maria von Weber 

Symphony No. 4 in E Minor Johannes Brahms 

Allegro non troppo 

Andante moderato 

Allegro giocoso 

Allegro energetico e passionato 

Concerto in B flat minor for Piano and Orchestra. . .PETER I. TSCHAIKOVSKY 
First Movement (Allegro non troppo e molto maestoso) 

Soloist, Jorge Bolet 
INTERMISSION 

Requiem Gabriel Faure 

Curtis Symphony Orchestra and Chorus 

Louis Bailly, Conductor 

Soloists — Natalie Bodanskaya, Soprano; Conrad Thibault, Baritone 

Lawrence Apgar, Organist 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute 0/ Music 



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Carnegie Hall Program 

SEASON I 931—1932 



FIRE NOTICE— 'Look around now and choose the 

nearest exit to your seat. In case of fire walk (not run) to 

that Exit. Do not try to beat your neighbor to the street. 

John J. Dorman, Fire Commissions 



CARNEGIE HALL 

Friday Evening, January 29, at 8:45 o'clock 



The Curtis 
Symphony Orchestra 

FRITZ REINER, Conductor 



PROGRAMME 

Overture to "Oberon" 

Carl Maria von Weber 



Symphony No. 4 in E Minor 

Johannes Brahms 

Allegro non troppo 

Andante moderate* 

Allegro giocoso 

Allegro energetico e passionato 

Program Continued on Second Page Following 

INFORMATION BUREAU FOR LOST AND FOUND 
ARTICLES AT SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE 






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Concerto in B flat minor for Piano and < | 

Orchestra PETER I. TsCHAlKOVSKY O 

First Movement (Allegro non troppo e \ \ 

molto maestoso) ^ ^ 

Soloist, Jorge Bolet {Artist-Student) ( j 

Intermission 

Requiem Gabriel Faure 

Introit et Kyrie — Offertoire — Sanctus — Pie 

Jesu — Agnus Dei — Libera me — In Paradisum ^ | 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra and Chorus * y 
conducted by Louis Bailly < > 

Soloists 
Natalie Bodanskaya, Soprano 
Conrad Thibault, Baritone 
Lawrence Apgar, Organist 

(Artist-Students) ^ y 

The Curtis Institute of Music- 
Philadelphia 
JOSEF HOFMANN, Director { ] 

> 



The piano is a Steinwa) 



Management 
Richard Copley 



Student Personnel will be found on Page Twelve 

Patrons expecting telephone calls will kindly leave 
seat number at Superintendent's office. 

See Concert Announcements of all Divisions of the 
Columbia Concerts Corporation on Page Eleven 

See Page Eight for Schrafft's Announcement 
See page 2 for Aeolian Announcement 



— «fc> 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 

19314932 

Fourth Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 

by Artist'Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

These Concerts are under the direction of Dr. Louis Bailly 
of the Department of Chamber Music 

First Concert 
Sunday Evening, November 8, 1931 

at 8.15 o , cloc\ 

CASIMIR QUARTET 

Paul Gershman { VioIins Leon Frengut, Viola 
Philip Frank \ Frank Miller, Violoncello 

Assisted by 
Genia Wilkomirska, Soprano Jean-Marie Robinault, Piano 

The Piano is a Steinway 



«fc> 



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Programme 



<&> 



String Quartet in F major, Opus 18, Number 1 . .LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN 

Allegro con brio 

Adagio affettuoso ed appassionato 

Scherzo — Allegro molto 

Allegro 

Casimir Quartet 



Ludwig van Beethoven (1770' 1827) passed the greater part of his life in 
Vienna where, notwithstanding his erratic conduct and ungovernable temper, he 
was for years the admired favorite of aristocratic musical circles. Nine great 
symphonies, an opera "Fidelio," songs, pianoforte sonatas, trios, and sixteen quar' 
tets are superb examples of his genius. The quartets group themselves into three 
periods corresponding broadly to the composer's musical evolution. Thus the 
first period is characterized by a close adhesion to already current laws of quartet 
composition and exemplified by Haydn and Mozart; the second expresses more 
daringly the individual ideas of the composer, a mature man, freeing himself from 
arbitrary rules, while the third period transcends all rigid bonds of musical form 
and attempts to express his intellectual inspiration in developing the musical 
content. 

The Quartet, Opus 18, No. 1, is classed in the first period, but on account 
of its astonishing mastery of contrapuntal line, it stands by itself in contrast to 
the five following quartets of the same period which all adhere closely to the 
Mozartian form. In fact, this quartet may be regarded as the direct forerunner 
of the titanic works of Beethoven's last period. 



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*4* 



Tldebrando Pizzetti 



Three Songs for Soprano and String Quartet . . 

Donna Lombarda 
La Prigioniera 
La pesca deU'anello 

Miss Wilkomirska and Casimir Quartet 

Ildebrando Pizzetti (born in Parma in 1880), Director of the Milan Con' 
servatory, has made his musical evolution largely in serious experimentation in 
writing opera in various forms. Of all the modern Italians he seems to approach 
his work from a more analytic and intellectual standpoint, accepting modernism 
with reservations only since he regards complexity and bizarre effects as too often 
a masque for poverty of ideas. His own deep study of the early Italian masters 
has born fruit in masterly choral writing, as, for instance, in the operas "La Nave" 
and "Fedra," which he composed to texts by the poet LTAnnunzio. The Italian 
folk song appeals greatly to Pizzetti; the three songs on the program are examples 
of his use of this native art form. 



Woman of Lombardy 

Love me, Woman of Lombardy." 
'I cannot love you because I have a husband." 
'If you have a husband, make him die. 
I shall teach you. 
Go into the garden of the priest ; 
There is a serpent ; 
Take the head of the serpent and grind it 

well ; 
When you have ground it, give it to him 

to drink." 
The husband arrived, tired and thirsty. 
He asked for a drink. 
"Which will you have, sir husband, 
The white or black wine? 
Of the white, which is the best, there is 

plenty." 
Speaks a child of nine months: 
"Do not drink of that wine. In it there is 

poison." 
"What is wrong with this wine, Oh, Woman 
of Lombardy, 
That it is not clear?" 
"It may be the thunders of the other evening 

That have made it cloudy." 
"Oh Woman of Lombardy, you drink it." 
"I cannot drink, sir husband, because I am 

not thirsty." 
"With this sword that I have in my hand I 

shall kill you." 
"And for the love of the King of France, I 
shall die." 



The Prisoner 

She sends word to her sister, 

Please to take her out of prison. 

And the sister answers that she can rot in 

prison. 
She sends word to her mother 
Please to take her out of prison. 
And her mother answers that she can rot in 

prison. 
She sends word to her father 
Please to take her out of prison. 
And her father answers that she can rot in 
prison. 



She sends word to her lover 
Please to take her out of prison. 
And he goes and takes her away. 
'Little dark one, do not dance any more, 
For your sister is dead." 
'And if she is dead, let her be. 
When I was in prison she did not want to 

free me. 
Play violins, I want to dance." 
Little dark one, do not dance any more. 
For your mother is dead." 
'And if she is dead, let her be. 
When I was in prison she did not want to 

free me. 
Play violins, I want to dance." 
'Little dark one, do not dance any more, 
For your father is dead." 
'And if he is dead, let him be. 
When I was in prison he did not want to 

free me. 
Play violins, I want to dance." 
'Little dark one, do not dance any more, 
For your lover is dead." 

'If he is truly dead, then I shall make me 
A black garment, and I do not want to 

dance any more, 
And soon I too will die." 

The Fishing of the Ring 

There were three sisters 
And all three were ready to love. 
Rossetta, the prettiest, sailed away. 
In sailing she dropped her ring. 
"Oh, fisherman of the waves 
Come and fish closer here 
And fish up my ring that has fallen into the 
sea." 
"When I shall have fishedit, 

What will you give me?" 
"One hundred gold pieces and an embroidered 

money bag." 
"I do not want so many gold pieces 
Or an embroidered money bag. 
Only a kiss of love if you want to give it 
to me." ( 

"What will the people say who see us kiss.-"' 
"They will say that it is love that has done 
it." 



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Programme 



Quintet in Three Movements, Opus 41, for Piano and. . .Gabriel Pierne 
String Quartet 

Moderato molto tranquillo 
Sur un rythme de Zortzico 

(Popular dance from the Basque 
Country) 
Lento — Allegro vivo ed agitato 



Mr. Robinault and Casimir Quartet 

Henri Constant Gabriel Pierne (born in 1863) studied at the Paris Con- 
servatoire, receiving the Prix de Rome in 1882. Eight years later he succeeded 
the composer Cesar Franck to the important post of organist at the Church of 
Ste. Chlotilde in Paris. Later he became conductor of the famous "Concerts 
Colonne" and is today an outstanding figure in French music. 

His style is marked by grace, facility and a security of technic in production 
of his effect. His oratorio, "The Children's Crusade," 1 is his best known work 
and an excellent example of his musical writing. 

The Piano Quintet is the most important work in chamber music of today 
and by reason of its polyphony may be ranked at the head of all piano quintets 
as yet written. The thematic development is far broader than is usual in this 
form of composition, and the richness of emotional content built up to great 
climaxes is a revelation of what tonal effects a sensitive artist can create even 
when employing a comparatively rigid musical form. 

The first movement is conceived in a subdued and somewhat melancholy at' 
mosphere. The second is founded upon a Basque dance, "L'Expata Danza," in 
5'8 rhythm, while the third movement is built upon themes of the two preceding 
ones worked out on most extraordinary contrapuntal lines towards the great climax 
of the work. 



The next concert will be given on December 13, 1931 
6^ <^? 



— «fc> 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 

19314932 



Fourth Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 

by Artist'Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

These Concerts are under the direction of Dr. Louis Bailly 
of the Department of Chamber Music 

Second Concert 



Sunday Evening, December 13, 1931 

at 8.15 o'cloc\ 



The Piano is a Steinway 



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Programme 



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Quintet in A major, Kochel No. 581, WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART 

for Clarinet and String Quartet 

Allegro 

Larghetto 

Menuetto 

Allegretto con variazioni 

James Collis, Clarinet 
Lily Matison l Virginia Majewski, Viola 

Frances Wiener \ w ms Adine Barozzi, Violoncello 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (born Salzburg 1756 — died Vienna 1791) was 
a wonder-child, who at the age of five years was playing in public and compos' 
ing. His astounding instinctive musical genius continued steadily to develop and 
to produce works in all the major forms of his art, many of which are still 
unsurpassed in beauty. Although Mozart's life was short (he died at thirty-five) 
over six hundred compositions, including operas, forty-nine symphonies, nine 
string quintets, twenty-six quartets and forty-five violin sonatas attest an almost 
unparalleled fecundity of exceptional genius. 

The Clarinet Quintet, completed two years before Mozart's death, was 
written especially for a friend, Stadler by name, who was a well known clarinet 
player. The tonal quality of the clarinet is such that Mozart very cleverly does 
not attempt to blend it with the strings, but gives it the leading voice, as for 
instance in the famous "Larghetto," which is in fact, a song for the clarinet 
against an obligato for the strings. The last movement of the quintet has varia- 
tions on a simple theme reminiscent of the preceding movements. The melodious 
charm of this quintet greatly appealed to the composer Brahms and influenced 
him in at least one of his own works (Opus 115). 



d^o -<^? 



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Programme 



v5"> 

Four Poems for Voice, Viola and Piano CHARLES MARTIN LOEFFLER 

Opus 5 

La Cloche Felee (Baudelaire) 
Dansons la Gigue (Verlaine) 
Le Son du Cor s'afflige (Verlaine) 
Serenade (Verlaine) 

Rose Bampton, Contralto 
Virginia Majewski, Viola Florence Fraser, Piano 

Charles Martin Tornov Loeffler (born Alsace 1861) studied the violin with the great 
Joachim in Berlin and became a member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra soon after his 
arrival in New York in 1881. Since 1903, however, he has devoted his time to teaching and 
composition, especially in orchestral and chamber music forms. His compositions exhibit 
the clarity and elegance of the French, but are also influenced by Russian musical thought. 
Few are published as the composer is continually remoulding and polishing his work. 
Strangely dissimilar subjects attract his interest, as for instance, the pagan in his "Pagan Poem" 
suggested by Vergilian themes, and the ecclesiastical, as in his "St. Francis of Assisi," "Hora 
Mystica" and "Music for Four Stringed Instruments," all of which works are impregnated with 
Gregorian chant forms. 

The songs, after words by Baudelaire and Verlaine, follow the spirit of the text very 
closely in an interpretation ot the poets' widely contrasted moods of exaltation and base 
humanity. 

Filled with the sadness of an orphaned cry 
That flies away, among the hills to die, 
Pressed by the winds, sharp-baying for its 
blood. 

The wolf's soul wailing, in the cry you hear, 
That at the sunset rises in distress ; 
An anguish that is well-nigh a caress — 
That charms, yet fills you with a sickening 

fear. 
As tho' t' enhance that plaintive dying call, 
In ribband rifts the snow begins to fall 
Across the incarnadined Occident ; 

And all the air seems like an autumn sigh, 
So soft it is, 'neath the dull evening sky, 
Along the peaceful landscape somnolent. 



The Riven Bell 

How sad it is, yet sweet, on winter's night 

to sit 
Beside the flickering fire, and watch the smoke 

a-climbing ; 
Old recollections then will through one's 

memory flit, 
Awakened by the bells, that in the mist are 

chiming. 

Ah ! happy is the bell whose throat is strong 

and sound, 
Bell that, in spite of age, keeping its strength 

and beauty, 
Flings ever steadfastly its sacred voice around, 
Like some brave warrior old, forever there on 

duty. 

Ah ! riven is my soul ; and when in its dis- 
tress 

'Twould people with its songs the cold night's 
loneliness. 

There often will be times, when its voice, 
weak and shaken, 

Sounds like the wounded groans of one who 
lies forsaken 

Beside a pool of blood, with corpses heaped 
above, 

And in an awful struggle dies, — yet does not 
move. 

On with the Dancing! 

On with the dancing ! 
Above all else I loved her eyes, 
That shone like stars in midnight skies ; 
No malice in them you'd surprise. 

On with the dancing ! 
She had a way with her, I swear, 
To drive poor lovers to despair, 
That was delightful, I declare. 

On with the dancing! 
But now I know that what was best, 
Was when her flower-like mouth she pressed 
To mine. She died upon my breast. 

On with the dancing ! 
I mind them well, I mend them well — 
Those hours, and many a happy spell: 
Best luck that ever me befell. 

On with the dancing! 

The Horn's Note Sobs and 
Struggles Toward the Wood 

The horn's note sobs and struggles toward the 
wood, 



Serenade 

As tho' it were the voice of one that cries 

From where he lies buried, 
Hear, lady, to thy chamber window rise 

My voice harsh and wearied. 

My mandoline thine ear a moment long, 

Thine heart, too, surrender. 
For thee it was, for thee I made this song, 

So cruel, so tender. 

I'll sing thine eyes that onyx are and gold, 

Clear and unclouded, 
Thy Lethe breasts that Stygian tresses hold 

In darkness enshrouded. 

As tho' it were the voice of one that cries 

From where he lies buried, 
Hear, lady, to thy chamber window rise 

My voice harsh and wearied. 

Then will I greatly praise, as is their right, 

Beauties without number, 
Whose mem'ries still come to me on a night 

Deserted of slumber. 

And then to end, I'll tell thee of thy kiss, 

All red-lipped and human, 
Thy sweetness, with its agonizing bliss: 

My angel — My demon ! 

My mandoline thine ear a moment long, 

Thine heart, too, surrender. 
For thee it was, for thee I made this song, 

So cruel, so tender. 

Translations by Henry G. Chapman. 



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Programme 



«?■> 



Quintet in D major, Opus 51, ANTONY STEPANOVITCH ARENSKY 

for Piano and String Quartet 

Allegro moderato 
Andante con variazioni 
Scherzo: Allegro vivace 
Finale: Allegro moderato 

Jorge Bolet, Piano 
Jacob Brodsky / Leonard Mogill, Viola 

Ladislaus Steinhardt \ l0lms Howard Mitchell, Violoncello 

Antony Stepanovitch Arensky (born Novgorod 1861 — died 1906) was a 
pupil of RimskyKorsakov at the Conservatory of St. Petersburg. In 1882 he 
became Professor of Harmony at the Conservatory of Moscow and subsequently 
was for many years Director of the Court Chapel at St. Petersburg. He occupies 
an important place in the development of modern Russian music, bridging the 
space between Tschaikowsky (who influenced him deeply) and the present com- 
posers such as Rachmaninov. Arensky is best known for his songs, piano pieces, 
and especially his Piano Trio in D minor. 

The Piano Quintet is a masterpiece of brilliant writing of the mature years 
of the composer. 

The first movement is built upon two themes, the second of which is of 
great beauty, developed in a somewhat pompous style. The second movement 
consists of variations upon the old French folk song "Sur le pont d' Avignon." 
The third is a very rapid Scherzo, a test of the virtuosity of the players; while 
the fourth and last movement is in fugue form upon themes already announced 
in the first two movements. 



The next concert will be given on January 31, 1932 
d^o ^ 



-«fc> 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 

19314932 



Fourth Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 

by Artist'Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

These Concerts are under the direction of Dr. Louis Bailly 
of the Department of Chamber Music 

Third Concert 



Sunday Evening, January 31, 1932 

at 8.15 o , cloc\ 



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Programme 



Quintet, Opus 39, Alexander Constantinovich Glazounov 

for Two Violins, Viola and Two Violoncelli 

Allegro 

Scherzo 

Andante sostenuto 

Finale: Allegro moderato 

Jack Pepper ) Adine Barozzi I 

Jean SpitzerP ioIins Samuel Geschichter J V " loncelh 

Virginia Majewski, Viola 

Alexander Constantinovich Glazounov (born in St. Petersburg, 1865) was 
fortunate in finding himself, from childhood, in association with musicians of the 
first rank in the Russian capitol. Musically precocious, he was early accepted as 
a pupil by RimskyKorsakov, leader of the Russian Nationalistic School of Music, 
whose instruction developed in Glazounov a brilliant technique in orchestral com' 
position. This, the young composer, in his first period, devoted to works of 
typically Russian character, descriptive and programmatic in style. Later how' 
ever he drew away from the Slavic mood and devoted his gifts to more purely 
classical forms. He has written many beautiful songs, 5 (unnumbered) quartets, 
several symphonies and a great many orchestral pieces. In 190? he succeeded 
RimskyKorsakov as Director of the St. Petersburg Conservatory and, as member 
of the famous house of Belaiev, has been an important factor in publishing com- 
positions of Russian musicians. 

The String Quintet, Opus 39, was composed in 1892. The main subject of 
the first movement is a long phrase of twelve bars, extremely sensuous in its broad 
melodic line. The second subject is quieter in expression. In neither the first 
nor the second movements of this work does Glazounov display any distinctly 
Russian character. The second movement opens with a pizzicato of the ostinato 
type, combining ternary and binary rythms which calls to mind the scherzo of the 
String Quartet of Debussy. The movement ends in a melodic atmosphere similar 
to that of the preceding one. The third movement contains a beautiful long 
theme somewhat in the Wagnerian style of the Meistersinger. It is in the Finale 
that Glazounov at last develops a truly Russian atmosphere in a rude dance of 
the Moujiks, succeeded by a joyous fugato and a third and final subject which is 
thoroughly oriental. 



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Programme 



<4» 

Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Opus 115 Johannes Brahms 

for Clarinet and String Quartet 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Andantino — Presto non assai, ma con sentimento 

Con moto 

James Collis, Clarinet 
Gama Gilbert } Leonard Mogill, Viola 

Benjamin SharlipJ Vl ° Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

Johannes Brahms (born in Hamburg, 1833 — died in Vienna, 1897) spent the 
greater part of his life in Vienna. His original genius and his unswerving devc 
tion to his own ideals set him apart from the older school of composers, of which 
Beethoven was the consummation, as well as from the "Romanticists", led by 
Schumann; the dramatic ideas of Wagner, and the sensational descriptive school 
of Berlioz, Liszt, and other contemporaries. During his whole life Brahms was a 
storm center of criticism and discussion, but today a fuller appreciation of the 
nobility and majesty of his conceptions, and an understanding of his very original 
style have replaced the old hostility. Four great symphonies, many songs, choral 
works, chamber music in various forms, as well as numerous compositions for the 
pianoforte (for Brahms was in early life a professional pianist) are the fruit of 
incessant work during the sixtyfour years of his life. 

Folksong was the inexhaustible spring from which he drew inspiration, 
developing and embellishing it with all the technical means of which he was a 
master, and coloring it with his own peculiar personal style. 

The musical material in the Quintet, Opus 115, is developed by Brahms in 
the usual form, showing the influence of Bach and Beethoven, but with an 
individuality of expression so original, so vital, that the whole work is unlike 
anything else in classical music. Especially in the second movement, the great 
current of the composer's genius breaks through the restrictions of conventions to 
rise to passionate heights of expression such as a great artist-improvisator might 
reach in rare moments of exaltation. The finale, of variations in Mozartian style, 
is enriched by all the arts of modern polyphony, terminating in a subdued note of 
melancholy; the reflex of the emotional excitement of the preceding movements. 



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Programme 



Sinfonietta, Opus 48, Rudolf Novacek 

Octet for Wind Instruments 

Allegro molto 

Presto 

Adagio 

Allegro molto vivace 

John Hreachmack, Flute William Santucci , 

Bassooiis 



ISADORE GOLDBLUM, Oboe ANDREW LuCK 

James Collis ) Harry Berv 

Leon Lester Clannets Attillio De Palma f Horns 



Rudolf Novacek, Hungarian composer and violinist, studied at the Prague 
School of the Organ and was at one time concertmaster of a symphonic orchestra 
in Helsingfors (Finland) under the conductors Kajanus and Sibelius, where 
several of his works were played. In 1910 Novacek's piano composition "Em 
ernstes Praludium und eine lustige Fuge" won one of the ten prizes offered by 
the "Signale fur die Musikalische Welt."' Many of his pieces are popular in type, 
(marches, mazurkas, etc.) but the more serious include a Suite for Violin and 
Piano (Opus 12) and a Sinfonietta (Opus 48) for wind instruments. 

The Sinfonietta, dated 1 905, is a melodious work distinctly Czech in 
atmosphere, recalling Smetana's overture to "The Bartered Bride" and certain of 
the passages in Weber's opera "Der Freischutz". It makes clear use of the timbres 
of various types of wind instruments indicating a thorough understanding of the 
peculiar quality of each. 



The next concert will be given on March 6, 1932 
d^ H^p 



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THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 

19314932 



Fourth Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 

by Artist'Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

These Concerts are under the direction of Dr. Louis Bailly 
of the Department of Chamber Music 

Fourth Concert 



Sunday Evening, March 6, 1932 

at 8.15 o'cloc\ 



The Piano is a Steinway 
<*»- «*? 



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Programme 



String Quartet in D flat major, Opus 15 ERNST VON DOHNANYI 

Andante — Allegro 
Presto acciaccato 
Molto adagio — Animato 

Swastika Quartet 

Gama Gilbert i ... .. Max Aronoff, Viola 

Benjamin SharlipJ W m Orlando Cole, Violoncello 



Ernst von Dohnanyi (born in Presburg, Hungary, July 27, 1877) has made 
a permanent reputation for himself as a pianist and composer. From his first 
appearances in Europe and America (1899) his exceptional technique, beautiful 
tone and phrasing and intensely poetical nature have marked him as a musician 
of high rank. In 1919 he became Director of the Conservatory of Buda-Pesth, 
the school where he was trained. Works for piano and chamber music were his 
first means of expression as a composer, but later, dramatic forms claimed his 
attention. In musical structure and counterpoint, Brahms has exerted a strong 
influence upon him. Dohnanyi has not drawn as directly upon the folk songs of 
Hungary as have his compatriots, Bartok and Kodaly, but his work gives expres- 
sion to that Hungarian romanticism and spirit, which so largely influenced sur- 
rounding Slavonic nations and composers during the nineteenth century. 

The second Quartet in D flat major, Opus 15, is the work of a master at the 
height of his power, and may be classed as one of the best written by any living 
composer. The whole movement is dramatic with slow themes moving against 
an agitated and rapid background. Especially in the Scherzo with its repeated 
notes, is one impressed by the feeling of something sinister and foreboding. The 
quartet is tinged with a distinctly Hungarian color while built upon strictly 
classical lines. 



(^ <^? 



rf^j ■ ^ 



Programme 



Recitative and Aria: "Ombra mai fu" 

from "Xerxes" GEORGE FREDERIC HANDEL 

(Viola obbligato played by Max Aronoff) (1685-1759) 

Recitative and Aria: "Che faro senza Euridice" 

from "Orpheus" CHRISTOPH WlLLIBALD GLUCK 

(1714-1787) 



Das Madchen spricht, Opus 107, No. 3) Toh\nnes 

Madchenfluch, Opus 69, No. 9 / (1833-1 



Brahms 
897) 



Edwina Eustis, Contralto 
Sarah Lewis at the Piano 



d^y r^p 



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Programme 



Quartet in C minor, Opus 15, GABRIEL FAURE 

for Piano, Violin, Viola and Violoncello 

Allegro molto moderato 
Scherzo: Allegro vivo 
Adagio 
Allegro molto 

Yvonne Krinsky, Piano Leonard Mogill, Viola 

Philip Frank, Violin Samuel Geschichter, Violoncello 



Gabriel Faure (18454924), preeminent as composer, organist and Director 
of the Paris Conservatory, has exerted a strong influence upon modern French 
music through his own writings as well as through his numerous distinguished 
pupils who are today outstanding figures in French music. His works, which are 
numerous, comprise many songs, especially a collection entitled "La Bonne 
Chanson 1 '; an opera "Penelope" produced with success at the Opera Comique in 
Paris; two unusually fine piano quartets, masterpieces for the combinations of 
strings and the piano; a well known violin sonata, two string quartets; a note- 
worthy orchestra piece "Pelleas and Melisande" and a "Requiem" recently heard 
at these concerts. 

The first piano quartet is dated 1874 and is, after half a century, still re 
markable for its freshness, originality and richness in harmonic quality and its 
deep emotional content. 

The first movement announces at once a powerful theme by the strings in 
unison with an accompaniment on the piano in the form of syncopated chords. 
This is succeeded by a second subject composed of several short phrases of very 
graceful character. 

The second movement, contrary to the usual convention, is in scherzo form, 
a lively rhythmical combination of subjects in 6 /s and 2 A time. 

The third movement is an adagio, rather elegiac in style, creating an atmos' 
phere of repose: a sort of endless dream, very typical of the musical expression 
of Faure. 

The finale, opening with a violently energetic theme, terminates in an atmos' 
phere created by a second theme of suave and caressing character in complete 
contrast to the opening. 



The next concert will be given on April 17, 1932 
6^> ^? 



(5^ «*? 

THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ART 

19314932 



Fourth Season of 
Chamber Music Concerts 

by Artist'Students 

of 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

These Concerts are under the direction of Dr. Louis Bailly 
of the Department of Chamber Music 

Fifth and Last Concert 



Sunday Evening, April 17, 1932 

at 8. IS o'cloc\ 



The Piano is a Steinway 

6^ «fc> 



<^ c^p 



Programme 



I. String Quartet in E minor, Opus 116 Bedrich Smetana 

"Aus meinem Leben" 

Allegro vivo appassionato 
Allegro moderato a la Polka 
Largo sostenuto 
Vivace 

Jacob Brodsky / v . .. Leonard Mogill, Viola 

Ladislaus Steinhardt^ l0 ms Howard Mitchell, Violoncello 

Bedrich Smetana (1824-1884), Bohemian composer, was a gifted youth, 
who had few opportunities for musical culture in his early years. Through his 
own determination however, he managed to acquire a remarkable piano tech' 
nique, and his performances, of Liszt's works especially, attracted so much 
attention that he was finally accepted at the Prague Conservatory. Until deaf- 
ness overtook him, he composed, played and taught in this city. An opera 
"The Bartered Bride", a fine trio, inspired by the death of a favorite child, and 
two quartets, called "Aus meinem Leben" I and II, are the best known of his 
works. As Smetana has himself very clearly indicated his intentions in regard 
to his quartets no one need go further to understand them. 

"My quartet (Opus 116)" says he, "stands quite apart from hitherto 
accepted quartet style. ... I wanted to paint in sounds the course of my 
life. . . . the form of each composition is the outcome of the subject". 

The first movement expresses his youthful love of Art, the romantic enthu- 
siasms and tendencies of a young man. 

The second, in typical Bohemian polka form, paints "memories of my gay 
life . . . when I used to be known as an enthusiastic dancer". It is interesting 
to note that the middle section of this movement was considered so unplayable 
that the whole work was refused by the Prague Quartet in 1878. 

The third movement "recalls the bliss of my first love for a girl who after- 
ward became my faithful wife." 

The fourth "the discovery how to treat the national material in music, joy 
at the results of following this path." It is in this movement that occurs the 
persistent note, high E, which announces the approach of the composer's deaf- 
ness which ultimately caused his complete retirement from public life. 



II. 1 . Fantasia in C major George Frederic Handel 

(1685-1759) 

2. Rondo alia Turca, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

(1756-1791) 

3. Intermezzo in B minor, Opus 4, No. 6 Robert Schumann 

(1810-1856) 

4. Valse-Impromptu in A flat major Franz Liszt 

(1811-1886) 

Sol Kaplan, Pianist 



<^> ^ 



d^>- — c^p 



Programme 



IN MEMORIAM 

III. Suite in D major, Opus 24, dans le style ancien . . . .VlNCENT d'InDY 
for Trumpet, Two Flutes, Two Violins, Viola, 
Violoncello and Double Bass 

Prelude 

Entree 

Sarabande 

Menuet 

Ronde Francaise 

Samuel Krauss, Trumpet Philip Frank / 

John Hreachmack/ Charles JaffeJ ° s 

Ardelle Hookins \ tlutes Virginia Majewski, Viola 

Howard Mitchell, Violoncello 
Irven Whitenack, Double Bass 

P. M. T. Vincent d'Indy (1851-1931). The recent death of Vincent 
d'Indy removed from French music of today one of its foremost figures, not 
only as composer, but as a connecting link between the great past and the tur' 
bulent present. The paramount influences in the life and art of d'Indy were, 
first and foremost, his master Cesar Franck; a profound study of Gregorian Chant 
and the pure classics, and at one time, Richard Wagner. Particularly in his 
Chamber Music does d'Indy indicate the results of his austere taste and his strict 
adhesion to an almost mathematical and logical development of his materials. 
Here are permitted no tricks of tone color, nor any merely sensual appeal. On 
the other hand the composer exhibits great skill in rhythmic transformation and 
extraordinary resources in counterpoint. One may compare such works with 
those of the great Bach, or liken them to a fine etching in which each line is 
essential to the design, and effects are produced by emphasis relation, not by 
color. d'Indy, whose musical erudition was immense, was the author of a very 
important work "Cours de Composition", which has had world-wide influence 
upon the art of musical composition. 

His works comprise several operas, symphonies, an oratorio "St. Chris- 
tophe", incidental music to "Medea and Jason", various tone poems — some with 
solo instruments, a musical setting for Schiller's "Wallenstein" and a great 
number of chamber music compositions for various combinations of instruments. 



(5^3 - -c^p 



<^o e^p 



Programme 



IV. Quintet in A major, Opus 114 FRANZ SCHUBERT 

for Piano, Violin, Viola, Violoncello and 
Double Bass 

Allegro vivace 

Andante 

Scherzo : Presto 

Thema con variazioni (Trout) 

Finale: Allegro giusto 

Jennie Robinor, Piano 
Gama Gilbert, Violin Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

Max Aronoff, Viola Irven Whitenack, Double Bass 

Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797-November 19, 1828) was the only 
one of the great composers native to Vienna. Called by Liszt "the most poetic 
of all musicians", he was also the most prolific. At the age when Beethoven 
had composed one symphony, Schubert already had written ten, besides numer- 
ous other works. He essayed practically all forms of composition, but his songs, 
of which there are 603, chamber music, and symphonies are of unusual beauty. 
Gayety, charm, melody, and at times the deepest tragedy characterize his works. 

This "Forellen'" Quintet owes its name to the fact that Schubert used the 
theme of his song "Die Forelle" (The Trout) in the fourth movement. The 
rustic mood of this song tinges the whole work which breathes the calm, gayety 
and freshness of the countryside, which Schubert loved and where he composed 
this Quintet. 

The first movement is simple and songlike, overspread with a delicate tracery 
of runs and ornamental figures. 

The second movement is full of melody in syncopated accents, thoroughly 
Viennese and dancclike, leading to a waltz which forms the Scherzo or third 
movement. It is now, in the fourth movement, (which is an inserted move- 
ment) that the Trout theme appears, with which Schubert plays, as an angler 
might play a wary fish, displaying an inexhaustible fertility of imagination, skill 
in manipulation of a theme, and a wealth of variations characteristic of his 
genius. 

The Finale or fifth movement crowns all with an arrangement of merry 
dances which are a compromise between the Bohemian and Viennese moods. 



(^ c^ 



WESTTOWN SCHOOL 

Westtown, Pennsylvania 
Saturday Evening, October 10, 1931, at 7.30 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 
* Jorge Bolet, Pianist 
**Margaret Codd, Soprano 
***Iso Briselli, Violinist 
f Earl Fox, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Organ Fantasy and Fugue in G minor Bach-Liszt 

Mr. Bolet 

II. Songs My Mother Taught Me Anton Dvorak 

Wer hat dies Liedlein erdacht? Gustav Mahler 

Le Nelumbo Ernest Moret 

L'oiseau bleu E. JaqueS'Dalcroze 

Miss Codd 

III. Romance in F major Ludwig van Beethoven 

Waltz in A major, Opus 39, No. 15 Johannes Brahms 

Variations on a Theme by Corelli Tartini-Kreisler 

Mr. Briselli 

IV - A„ b dXa( Manuel de Faela 

Waldesrauschen Franz Liszt 

Concert Arabesques on the Blue Danube Waltz • . Strauss-Schulz-Evler 

Mr. Bolet 

V. Shepherd! Thy Demeanour Vary Thomas Brown 

By the Fountain Harriet Ware 

"Caro nome" from "Rigoletto" Giuseppe Verdi 

Miss Codd 

VI. Liebesf reud Fritz Kreisler 

Siciliano and Rigaudon Francoeur-Kreisler 

Hungarian Dance, No. 5 in G minor Johannes Brahms 

Mr. Briselli 

*Student of Mr. David Saperton 
**Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 
***Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE 

Westminster, Maryland 
Friday Evening, l^pvember 6, 193 1 at 8 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Yvonne Krinsky, Pianist 

**W alter Vassar, Baritone 

***Irene Singer, Soprano 

fJosEPH Rubanoff, Accompanist 



PROGRAMME 

I. Prelude No. 3 in C sharp major from The WellTempered 1 

Clavichord, Book I [ Johann Sebastian Bach 

Prelude No. 6 in D minor from The WellTempered Clavi- 
chord, Book II 

Rhapsody in B minor, Opus 79, No. 1 Johannes Brahms 

Miss Krinsky 



d 

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II. Du Bist die Ruh "j 

Der Atlas I Franz Schubert 

Der Wanderer 
Rastlose Liebe i 

Mr. Vassar 

III. An Chloe Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer Johannes Brahms 

Se saran rose Luigi Arditi 

Miss Singer 

IV. Nocturne in E minor, Opus 72, No. 1 jp . , n 

Etude in F Minor, No. 1 from "Trois nouvelles Etudes" f Frederic Uhopin 

Prelude No. 10 in C sharp minor Alexander Scriabine 

Capriccio in F minor, Opus 28 Ernst von Dohna'nyi 

Miss Krinsky 

V. Phillis Has Such Charming Graces Anthony Young 

Song of the Open Frank La Forge 

A Spirit Flower Campbell-Tipton 

The Bird of the Wilderness Edward Horsman 

Miss Singer 

VI. Down Here Mary Brahe 

Oh, Mistress Mine Arthur Sullivan 

The Sound o' the Pipes Waldo Warner 

The Sleigh Richard Kountz 

Mr. Vassar 

VII. "Silvio! a quest 'ora" from "Pagliacci" Ruggiero Leoncavallo 

Miss Singer and Mr. Vassar 

*Student of Madame Isabelle Vengerova 
**Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
***Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 
tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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HILLSIDE SCHOOL 

Norwalk, Connecticut 
Saturday Evening, November 14, 193 1, at 8 o'clock 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*William Harms, Pianist 
**Natalie Bodanskaya, Soprano 
***Abe Burg, Violinist 
fVLADiMiR Sokoloff, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Variations serieuses, Opus 54 Fellx Mendelssohn 

Mr. Harms 

II. Tu lo sai Giuseppe Toreixi 

Vergebliches Standchen Johannes Brahms 

Minns Aria from "La Boheme" Giacomo Pucclni 

Les filles de Cadix Leo Delibes 

Miss Bodanskaya 

III. Praeludium in E major Bach-Kreisler 

First Movement from the Concerto in B minor, Opus 6t . .Camtlle Saint'Saens 

Allegro non troppo 
Mr. Burg 

IV. Dance of the Gnomes Franz Liszt 

Clair de Lune ) Claude Debussy 

Minstrels ) 

Capriccio in F minor, Opus 28 Ernst von Dohnanyi 

Mr. Harms 

V. The Lass with the Delicate Air Michael Arne 

Do not go, My Love Richard Hageman 

Ah, Love, but a Day! Mrs. H. H. A. Beach 

The Sleep that Flits on Baby's Eyes John Carpenter 

Me Company Along Richard Hageman 

Miss Bodanskaya 

VI. Mazurka in A minor, Opus 67, No. 4 Chopin-Kreisler 

Spanish Serenade Chaminade-Kreisler 

Apres un reve Faure-Elman 

Polonaise in D major, Opus 4 Henri Wleniawski 

Mr. Burg 

♦Student of Mr. Josef Hofmann 
♦♦Student of Madame Marcella Sembrich 
♦♦♦Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 
fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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MARYWOOD COLLEGE 

Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Friday Afternoon, T^ovember 20, 1931, at 2 o'c\oc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Cecille Geschichter, Pianist 
**Helen Gilbert, Violoncellist 
***George Pepper, Violinist 
f Earl Fox, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Sonata in C sharp minor, Opus 27, No. 2 Ludwig van Beethoven 

(Moonlight) 

Adagio sostenuto 
Allegretto 
Presto agitato 
Miss Geschichter 

II. First Movement from the Concerto in D minor Edouard Lalo 

Lento — Allegro maestoso 
Miss Gilbert 

III. Walther's Preislied from "Die Meistersinger" Wagner-Wilhelmj 

Hebrew Melody, No. 2 Joseph Achron 

Praeludium und Allegro Pugnani-Kreisler 

Mr. Pepper 



I, No. 1>. 
11 ) 



IV. Berceuse, Opus 57 

Waltz in D flat major, Opus 64, No. 1 \ Frederic Chopin 

Scherzo in B flat minor, Opus 31 

Miss Geschichter 



V. Arioso Bach-Franko 

Sicilienne Paradies-Dushkin 

Piece en forme de Habanera Maurice Ravel 

Spanish Serenade Alexander Glazounoff 

Miss Gilbert 

VI. Slavonic Dance, No. 2, in E minor Dvorak-Kreisler 

Malaguena Pablo de Sarasate 

Tambourin Chinois Fritz Kreisler 

Mr. Pepper 

'Student of Madame Isabelle Vengerova 
**Student of Mr. Felix Salmond 
***Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL 

Georgetown, Delaware 
Saturday Evening, 7<[ovember 21, 1931, at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Celia Gomberg, Violinist 
**Ruth Gordon, Contralto 
***Ralph Berkowitz, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Partita in E minor Johann Sebastian Bach 

Prelude : Maestoso 
Adagio ma non troppo 
Allemande 
Gigue 

Miss Gomberg 

II. Still wie die Nacht Carl Bohm 

Hans und Liesel Franz von Woyna 

Es blinkt der Thau Anton Rubinstein 

Widmung Robert Schumann 

Im Herbst Robert Franz 

Sapphische Ode (, Johannes Brahms 

Meine Liebe ist griin j 

Miss Gordon 

III. Intrada Jean Desplanes 

Valse Caprice Saint-Saens-Ysaye 

Gypsy Caprice Fritz Kreisler 

Etude-Caprice Kreutzer-Kaufman 

Miss Gomberg 

IV. Dido's Lament from "Dido and .^Eneas" Henry Purcell 

Phillis Was a Fair Maid Old English 

If Music Be the Food of Love Henry Purcell 

The Sleep that Flits on Baby's Eyes John Carpenter 

A Spirit Flower Campbell-Tipton 

Prelude from "A Cycle of Life" Landon Ronald 

Miss Gordon 

*Student of Madame Lea Luboshutz 
**Student of Madame Marcell<\ Semerich 
***Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE 

MITCHELL HALL 

Newark, Delaware 

Auspices: NEWARK MUSIC SOCIETY 

Friday Evening, December 4, 193 1, at 8 o , cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Lily Matison, Violinist 
**Katherine Conant, Violoncellist 
***Eugene Helmer, Pianist and t Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. First Movement from the "Syrnphonie espagnole" Edouard Lalo 

Allegro non troppo 

Variations on a Theme by Corelli Tartlni-Kreisler 

Miss Matison 

II. First Movement from the Concerto in B flat major Luigi Boccherini 

Allegro moderato 
Miss Conant 

III. Ballade in F major, Opus 38 Frederic Chopin 

Prelude in E flat minor, Opus 12, No. 2 Abram Chasins 

Moment Musical in E minor, Opus 16, No. 4 Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Mr. Helmer 

IV. Third Movement from the Sonata in G minor, Opus 65 Frederic Chopin 

Largo 

Menuet Claude Debussy 

Prayer from "Jewish Life" Ernest Bloch 

Melodie Frank Bridge 

Miss Conant 

V. Piece en forme de Habanera Maurice Ravel 

Montafiesa | VT „ 

Tonada Murciana \ Nin-Kochanski 

Sonata No. 12. Nicolo Paganini 

Andante innocentemente 

Allegro vivo e spiritoso 

Miss Matison 

•Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 
**Student of Mr. Felix Salmond 
***Student of Madame Isabelle Vengerova 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of Thb Curtis Institute op Music 



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GEORGE SCHOOL 

George School, Pennsylvania 
Saturday Evening, December 5, 193 1, at 8 o"cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Jean'Marie Robinault, Pianist 
**Paceli Diamond, Soprano 
***George Pepper, Violinist 
IJoseph Rubanoff, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

Prelude in C minor, Opus 28, No. 20 
Prelude in D flat major, Opus 28, No. 15 
Prelude in F sharp minor, Opus 28, No. 8 

Prelude in B flat major, Opus 21, No. 21 ) Frederic Chopin 

Prelude in B flat minor, Opus 28, No. 16 
Etude in E minor, Opus 25, No. 5 
Ballade in A flat major, Opus 47 

Mr. Robinault 



H 



II. Nebbie Ottorino Respighi 

Chanson d 1 Amour Ernest Chausson 

Ein Traum Edvard Grieg 

"Voi lo sapete" from "Cavalleria Rusticana" Pietro Mascagni 

Miss Diamond 

III. Walther's Preislied from "Die Meistersinger" Wagner- Wilhelmj 

Hebrew Melody, No. 2 Joseph Achron 

Praeludium und Allegro Pugnani-Kreisler 

Mr. Pepper 

IV. Intermezzo in E flat minor, Opus 118, No. 6 Johannes Brahms 

Feux d'artifice Claude Debussy 

Toccata Maurice Ravel 

Mr. Robinault 

V. The Faltering Dusk Walter Kramer 

The Clock G. Sachnowsky 

Blue Are Her Eyes Wintter Watts 

The Great Awakening Walter Kramer 

Miss Diamond 

VI. Slavonic Dance, No. 2, in E minor Dvorak-Kreisler 

Malaguefia Pablo de Sarasate 

Tambourin Chinois Fritz Kreisler 

Mr. Pepper 

•Student of Mr. David Saperton 
"Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 
•"Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 
tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinwa? is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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MOORESTOWN WOMAN'S CLUB 

Trinity Church 

Moorestown, New Jersey 

Monday Afternoon, December 7, 193 1, at 3 o'clo^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*James Collis, Clarinetist 
**Irene Beamer, Contralto 
***Lawrence Apgar, Organist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Second Movement from the Concerto in A major, 

Kbchel No. 622 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Adagio 
Mr. Collis 

II. Panis Angelicus Cesar Franck 

Agnus Dei Georges Beet 

Miss Beamer 

III. Prelude on "lam Sol Recedit Igneus" Bruce Simonds 

Idylle, Opus 5, No. 3 H. Leroy Baumgartner 

Mr. Apgar 

VI. Petite Piece Claude Debussy 

Fantaisie et Rondo, Opus 34 Carl Maria von Weber 

Mr. Collis 

V. "O Thou that Tellest Good Tidings to Zion"\ 

from "The Messiah" > George Frederic Handel 

"He Was Despised" from "The Messiah" / 

The Isle ) e n 

_ TT , , y oergei Rachmaninoff 

O Thou Billowy Harvest Field \ 

Miss Beamer 

VI. Toccata on "O Filii et FiUae" Lynnwood Farnam 

Two Choral Preludes for Organ Ernest Zechiel 

(First Performance) 

Die Nacht ist kommen 
Herr, ich habe missgehandelt 
Mr. Apgar 
All organ accompaniments played by Mr. Apgar 

•Student of Mr. Daniel Bonade 
"Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
""Student of Mr. Fernando Germani 

The Stbinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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SLEIGHTON FARM 

Darlington, Pennsylvania 
Sunday Evening, January 10, 1932, at 7:30 o'clock 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Lily Matison, Violinist 
**Albert Mahler, Tenor 
***Margaret Codd, Soprano 
IRalph Berkowitz, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I . Concerto in E minor Jules Conus 

Allegro molto — Andante espressivo — Allegro molto 
Miss Matison 

II . Im wunderschdnen Monat Mai | r, 

Ich grolle nicht \ RoBERT Schwann 

Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer ) . _, 

Meine Liebe ist grvin { Johannes Brahms 

"Una furtiva lagrima" from "L'Elisir d'Amore" Gaetano Donizetti 

Mr. Mahler 

III. Songs My Mother Taught Me Anton Dvorak 

L'oiseau bleu E. JaqueS'Dalcroze 

Le Nelumbo Ernest Moret 

"Caro Nome" from "Rigoletto" Giuseppe Verdi 

Miss Codd 

IV . Piece en forme de Habanera Maurice Ravel 

Montanesa "I VT T , 

Tonada Murciana / NlN " Kochanski 

Miss Matison 

V . Villanelle Eva Dell' Acqua 

By the Fountain Harriet Ware 

Mighty Lak' a Rose Ethelbert Nevin 

Song of the Rose Camille SainT'Sa'ens 

Miss Codd 

VI . Passing By Edward Purcell 

In the Silence of Night ) or. 

The Songs of Grusia f Sergei Rachmaninoff 

(With violin obligato part played by Miss Matison) 

Hills Frank La Forge 

Mr. Mahler 

•Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 
"Student of Mr. Horatio Connbll 
***Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 
tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of Thb Curtis Institute of Music 
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THE RAMBLER ASSOCIATION 

Moorestown, New Jersey 
Tuesday Evening, January 12, 1932, at 8:15 o'clock 



tfl 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

THE SWASTIKA QUARTET 

*Gama Gilbert j *Max Aronoff, Viola 

\ Violins 
*Benjamin Sharlip *Orlando Cole, Violoncello 

**Assisted by Florence Fraser, Piano 

PROGRAMME 

I. Quartet in D major, Opus 20, No. 4 Joseph Haydn 

Allegro di molto 

Un poco adagio affettuoso 

Menuetto: Allegretto alia zingarese 

The Swastika Quartet 

II. Novellettes, Opus 15 Alexander Glazounoff 

Interludium in modo antico 
Alia Spagnuola 

The Swastika Quartet 

III. Quartet in E flat major, for Piano, Violin, 

Viola and Violoncello Ludwig van Beethoven 

Adagio assai 
Allegro con spirito 
Tema con variazioni 

Florence Fraser, Piano Max Aronoff, Viola 

Gama Gilbert, Violin Orlando Cole, Violoncello 



'Student of Dr. Louis Baillt in Chamber Music 
•*Student of Mr. David Saperton 



The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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COATESVILLE JUNIOR CENTURY CLUB 

HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM 
COATESVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Thursday Evening, January 14, 1932, at 8:15 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Ezra Rachlin, Pianist 
**Edna Cord ay, Soprano 
***Frances Wiener, Violinist 
|Vladimir Sokoloff, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Theme and Variations, Opus 84, No. 1 Schubert-Tausig 

Liebesbotschaft J 

Der Lindenbaum > Schubert-Liszt 

Standchen J 

Mr. Rachlin 

II. Spirate Pur, Spirate Stefano Donaudy 

Plaisir d'amour Giovanni Martini 

"In quelle trine morbide" from "Manon Lescaut" Giacomo Puccini 

Miss Corday 

III. First Movement from the Concerto in B minor, Opus 61 Edward Elgar 

Allegro 
Miss Wiener 

IV. Etude-Tableau in E flat major, Opus 53, No. 7 Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Etudes No. 5 and No. 10 from the "Etudes d'ExecutionTranscendante" . . Franz Liszt 
Capriccio in F minor, Opus 28, No. 6 Ernst von Dohnanyi 

Mr. Rachlin 

V. A Spirit Flower Campbell'Tipton 

Lithuanian Song Frederic Chopin 

Down in the Forest rr r ,l Landon Ronald 

Prelude from A Cycle of Life ) 

Miss Corday 

VI. Air de Lensky Tschaikowsky-Auer 

Introduction et Tarentelle Pablo de Sarasate 

Miss Wiener 

•Student of Mr. Mieczyslaw Munz 
"Graduate Student of Madame Marceixa Sembrich 
***Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 
fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE 

mitchell hall 

Newark, Delaware 

Auspices: NEWARK MUSIC SOCIETY 

Friday Evening, January 15, 1932, at 8 o*cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Conrad Thibault, Baritone 
**Joseph Rubanoff, Accompanist 



PROGRAMME 

I. "The Song of Momus to Mars" from Dry den's 
"Secular Masque" 
At the Mid Hour of Night 
Once I Loved a Maiden Fair 
My Old Nag Ned 



.Old English 



II. Die Mainacht 

Sonntag 

Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer 
Der Gang zum Liebchen 



.Johannes Brahms 



III. D'une prison. . 
Chanson triste. 
Mandoline. . . . 



. Reynaldo Hahn 
. . Henri Duparc 
.Claude Debussy 



IV. El Pafio moruno 

Seguidilla murciana 

Asturiana 

Polo 



. Manuel de Falla 



51 



V. Lonesome Song of the Plains David Guion 

Mah Lindy Lou Lily Strickland 

Gwine to Hebbn Jaques Wolfe 

•Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
"Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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WESTTOWN SCHOOL 

Westtown, Pennsylvania 
Saturday Evening, January 16, 1932, at 7:30 o*cloc\ 



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The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Ethel Stark, Violinist 
** Alfred de Long, BassSaritone 
** Virginia Kendrick, Contralto 
***Yvonne Krinsky, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Air on G String Bach— Wilhelmj 

Gypsy Serenade Charles Valdez 

Tango Albeniz— Kreisler 

Saltarelle Wieniawski— Thibaud 

Miss Stark 

II. Bois Epais Jean-Baptiste de Lully 

Minnelied Johannes Brahms 

Ungeduld Franz Schubert 

Zueignung Richard Strauss 

Mr. de Long 

III. Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky 

Lachen und Weinen Franz Schubert 

Es shrie ein Vogel Christian Sinding 

Tod in Ahren Emil Mattiesen 

Im Herbst Robert Franz 

Miss Kendrick 

IV. Spanish Serenade Chaminade— Kreisler 

Carmen Fantaisie Bizet— Sarasate— Zimbalist 

Miss Stark 

V. My Star Mrs. H. H. A. Beach 

The Sleep that Flits on Baby's Eyes John Carpenter 

Moon-Marketing Powell Weaver 

"Farewell Ye Mountains" from "Jeanne d' Arc" .... Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky 
Miss Kendrick 

VI. "Hear Me ! Ye Winds and Waves ! " from "Scipio" .... George Frederic Handel 

The Pretty Creature Old English 

"Where'er You Walk" from "Semele" George Frederic Handel 

Roadways John Densmore 

Mr. de Long 

•Student of Madame Lea Luboshutz 
**Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
***Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institutb of Music 

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HILLSIDE SCHOOL 

Norwalk, Connecticut 
Saturday Evening, January 23, 1932, at 8 o'cloc\ 



r Stefano Donaudy 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Philip Frank, Violinist 
**Daniel Healy, Tenor 
***Bernard Frank, Accompanist for Philip Frank 
***Sarah Lewis, Accompanist for Daniel Healy 

PROGRAMME 

I. Scotch Fantasy Max Bruch 

Grave 
Allegro 

Andante sostenuto 
Allegro guerriero 
Mr. Frank 
II. O del mio amato ben 
Spirate pur, spirate 

O wiisst' ich doch den Weg ziiriick Johannes Brahms 

Zueignung Richard Strauss 

Mr. Healy 

III. Grand Adagio from the Ballet "Raymonda" Glazounoff— Zimbalist 

Waltz in A minor, Opus 33, No. 10 Schubert— Achron 

Turkish March from "The Ruin of Athens" Beethoven— Auer 

Dance of the Goblins Antonio Bazzini 

Mr. Frank 

IV. The Maiden Blush) 

To Daisies j Roger Quilter 

"Onaway! Awake Beloved!" from "Hiawatha's 

Wedding Feast" Samuel Coleridge-Taylor 

Molly Bawn | 

I'm not Myself at all f ° LD Irish 

Mr. Healy 

•Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 
**Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
"♦Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



Unionville Joint Consolidated School 

Unionville, Pennsylvania 
Friday Afternoon, February 12, 1932, at 2 o'doc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Frances Wiener, Violinist 
**Edna Corday, Soprano 
***Emil Schmachtenberg, Clarinetist 
f Vladimir Sokoloff, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Praeludium in E major Bach-Kreisler 

Valse Sentimentale Schubert-Fran ko 

Guitarre Moszkowski-Sarasate 

Miss Wiener 

II. Regrets Leo Delibes 

Toujours a Toi Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky 

Still wie die Nacht Carl Bohm 

Miss Corday 

III. Second Movement from the Concerto in A major, 

Kochel No. 622 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Adagio 

Piece en forme de Habanera RaveL'HaMELIN 

Concertino, Opus 26 Carl Maria von Weber 

Mr. Schmachtenberg 

IV. Grave Bach-Kreisler 

Introduction et Tarentelle Pablo de Sarasate 

Miss Wiener 

V. Love's Quarrel Cyril Scott 

The Moon at the Full Landon Ronald 

The Lilac Tree George Gartlan 

Call Me No More Charles Wakefield Cadman 

Miss Corday 



*Student of Mr. Edwin Bachmann 
**Graduate Student of Madame Marcella Sembrich 
***Student of Mr. Daniel Bonade 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinwat is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



GEORGE SCHOOL 

George School, Pennsylvania 
Saturday Evening, February 20, 1932, at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Carmela Ippolito, Violinist 
**Alfred de Long, Bass-Baritone 
***Edna Corday, Soprano 

f Bernard Frank, Accompanist for 

Carmela Ippolito 
fYvoNNE Krinsky, Accompanist for 
Alfred de Long and Edna Corday 

PROGRAMME 

I. Fourth and Fifth Movements from the "Symphonic Espagnole" 

Edouard Lalo 
Andante 
Rondo: Allegro 

Miss Ippolito 

II. Novembre Edouard Tremisot 

Auf dem Kirchhofe Johannes Brahms 

Traum durch die Dammerung j Rjchard Strauss 

Zueignung f 

Mr. de Long 

III. "Non so piu cosa son" from "Le Nozze di Figaro" 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

L'heure silencieuse Victor Staub 

Toujours a Toi Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky 

Miss Corday 

IV. "Nigun" from "Baal Shem" Ernest Bloch 

Tarantella Karol Szymanowski 

Miss Ippolito 

V. The Lass with the Delicate Air Michael Arne 

"O Sleep, Why Dost Thou Leave Me?" from "Semele" 

George Frederic Handel 

Call Me No More Charles Wakefield Cadman 

Homing Teresa Del Riego 

Miss Corday 

VI. "Hear Me! Ye Winds and Waves!" from "Scipio" 

George Frederic Handel 

The Pretty Creature Old English 

"Where-e'er You Walk" from "Semele" George Frederic Handel 

Don Juan's Serenade Peter Iljitch Tschaikowsky 

Mr. de Long 

'Graduate Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 
**Student of Mr. Horatio Connell 
***Graduate Student of Madame Marcella Sembrich 
tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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University of Delaware 

Mitchell Hall 

Newark, Delaware 

Auspices: Newark Music Society 

Tuesday Evening, March IS, 1932, at 8 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Joseph Levine, Pianist 
**Margaret Codd, Soprano 
***Jean Spitzer, Violinist 

fVLADiMiR Sokoloff, Accompanist 



PROGRAMME 

I. Funerailles Franz Liszt 

Chorus of the Whirling Dervishes Beethoven-Saint-Saens 

Mr. Levine 

II. Songs My Mother Taught Me Anton Dvorak 

Wer hat dies Liedlein erdacht? Gustav Mahler 

Maria Wiegenlied Max Reger 

Le Nelumbo Ernest Moret 

"Caro nome" from "Rigoletto" Giuseppe Verdi 

Miss Codd 

III. Variations on a Theme by Corelli Tartini-Kreisler 

Etchings Albert Spalding 

October Cinderella 

Books « Games 

Professor Sunday Morning 

Impatience Hurdy Gurdy 

Dreams Happiness 

Miss Spitzer 

IV. Berceuse Frederic Chopin 

Islamey : Oriental Fantasy Mily Balakireff 

Mr. Levine 

V. When I was Seventeen Swedish Folk Song 

By the Fountain Harriet Ware 

Lullaby Cyril Scott 

Song of the Nightingale Camille Saint-Saens 

Miss Codd 

VI. La Gitana Fritz Kreisler 

Old Vienna Godowsky-Press 

Hungarian Dance, No. 1 Brahms-Joachim 

Miss Spitzer 

♦Student of Mr. Josef Hopmann 
**Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 
***Student of Madame Lea Luboshutz 

fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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Western Maryland College 

Westminster, Maryland 
Friday Evening, April 8, 1932, at 8 o'clock^ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Helen Gilbert, Violoncellist 
**Fiorenzo Tasso, Tenor 
** Agnes Davis, Soprano 
***Eugene Helmer, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. First Movement from the Concerto in D minor Edouard Lalo 

Lento — Allegro maestoso 
Miss Gilbert 

II. Nebbie Ottorino Respighi 

"Lamento di Federico" from "Arlesiana" Francois Cilea 

Stornello Pietro Cimara 

Mr. Tasso 

III. Phillis Has Such Charming Graces Anthony Young 

L'heure delicieuse Victor Staub 

Maria Wiegenlied Max Reger 

"Un bel di, vedremo" from "Madama Butterfly" GlACOMO PUCCINI 

Miss Davis 

IV. Nocturne, Opus 15, No. 1 I Abram Chasins 

Humoresque, Opus 15, No. 2} 

Apres un reve Faure-Casals 

Piece en forme de Habanera Maurice Ravel 

Serenade Espagnole Alexander Glazounoff 

Miss Gilbert 

V. A Spirit Flower Campbell -Tipton 

Lullaby Cyril Scott 

The Soldier's Bride Sergei Rachmaninoff 

The Bird of the Wilderness Edward Horsman 

Miss Davis 

VI. Until Wilfrid Sanderson 

"Ah! Moon of My Delight" from 

"In a Persian Garden" Liza Lehmann 

Mr. Tasso 

VII. Duet: "La fatal pietra" from "Aida" Giuseppe Verdi 

Miss Davis and Mr. Tasso 

*Student of Mr. Felix Salmond 
**Student of Mr. Emilio de Gogorza 
***Student of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 
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MARYWOOD COLLEGE 

Scranton, Pennsylvania 

Tuesday Afternoon, April 26, 1932, at 2 o'cloc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

*Rosita Escalona, Pianist 
**Emil Schmachtenberg, Clarinetist 
***Ardelle Hookins, Flutist 
f Bernard Frank, Accompanist 

PROGRAMME 

I. Prelude and Fugue in E minor, Opus 3? Felix Mendelssohn 

Sonata in D Major Domenico Scarlatti 

Miss Escalona 

II. Second Movement from the Concerto in A major, 

Kochel No. 622 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Adagio 

Piece en forme de Habanera Ravel-Hamelin 

Concertino, Opus 26 Carl Maria von Weber 

Mr. Schmachtenberg 

III. Suite in B minor Bach-Bulow 

Polonaise 
Badinerie 

Nocturne et Allegro Scherzando Philippe Gaubert 

Miss Hookins 

IV. Nocturne in C sharp minor, Opus 27, No. 1 Frederic Chopin 

Habanera Claude Debussy 

Miss Escalona 

V. Sonate a Trois for Flute, Clarinet and Piano J. B. Loeillet 

(1653-1728) 

Miss Hookins, Mr. Schmachtenberg and Mr. Frank 

*Student of Mr. David Saperton 

**Student of Mr. Daniel Bonade 

•♦•Student of Mr. William Kincaid 

tStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 

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COATESVILLE JUNIOR CeNTURY ClUB 

High School Auditorium 

coatesville, pennsylvania 

Thursday Evening, May 5, 1932, at 8:15 o'chc\ 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

ARTIST-STUDENTS 

♦Joseph Levine, Pianist 
**Kathryn Dean, Contralto 
***Iso Briselli, Violinist 

tJosEPH Rubanoff, Accompanist 



PROGRAMME 

I. Funerailles Franz Liszt 

Berceuse Frederic Chopin 

Fairy Tale in E minor Nicolai Medtner 

Etude in F sharp major Igor Stravinsky 

Mr. Levine 

II. Eros Edvard Grieg 

All' mein Gedanken / n c 

Zueignung ( RoBERT Franz 

Fruhlingsnacht / D c 

Widmung } Robert Schumann 

Miss Dean 

III. Walther's Preislied from "Die Meistersinger" Wagner-Wilhelmj 

Siciliano and Rigaudon Francoeur-Kreisler 

Mr. Briselli 

IV. We'll to the Woods, and Gather May Charles Griffes 

Pirate Dreams Charles Heurter 

Japanese Death Song Earl Sharp 

Arioso from "La Mort de Jeanne d'Arc Hermann Bemberg 

Miss Dean 

V. Sonata in A major for Violin and Piano Cesar Franck 

Allegretto ben moderato 
Allegro 

Recitative — Fantasia 
Allegretto poco mosso 
Mr. Briselli and Mr. Levine 

*Student of Mr. Josef Hop man n 
**Student of Miss Harriet van Emden 
***Student of Mr. Efrem Zimbalist 

fStudent of Mr. Harry Kaufman in Accompanying 

The Steinway is the official piano of The Curtis Institute of Music 



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3« AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 58 



GRAND OPERA— SEASON 1931-1932 
THURSDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 22, 1931, AT 8 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

tannhAuser 

OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

(In German) 

Text and Music by RICHARD WAGNER 

HERMANN, Landgrave of Thunngia IVAN STESCHENKO 

TANNHAUSER 1 



WOLFRAM von ESCHENBACH 

WALTHER von der VOGELWEIDE. 

BITEROLF 

HEINRICH DER SCHREIBER 

REINMAR von ZWETER 



GOTTHELF PISTOR 

(First Time Here) 

JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 
Minstrel Knights. . \ ALBERT MAHLER 

ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 
DANIEL HEALY 
iLEO DE HIERAPOLIS 

ELIZABETH, Niece of the Landgrave ANNE ROSELLE 

VENUS, Goddess of Love CYRENA VAN GORDON 

A YOUNG SHEPHERD HELEN JEPSON 

CAROL DEIS 
I VIRGINIA KENDRICK 
N HELEN JEPSON 
RUTH GORDON 
The scene is laid in Thuringia, near the Wartburg, early in the 13th Century. 

Bacchanale in Act I — The Three Graces: Misses Sussel, Hubbard and Bingham; 
Fauns: Messrs. Coudy, Dollar, Taub and Popov; Nymphs: Misses Dorothy 
Littlefield, Campbell, Clausen, Mountain and Jacob. Grecian Youths and 
Maidens, Bacchantes: CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD, Premiere Danseuse and Corps 

de Ballet. 

CONDUCTOR FRITZ REINER 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I. The Interior of the H6rse!berg; then a Valley near the Wartburg. 
ACT II. The Great Hall of the Wartburg. 
ACT III. A Valley near the Wartburg. 



Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Conductor ALBERTO BIMBONI 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master IEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn 6? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 



Tannhauser 

By Richard Wagner 

The story of Tannhauser is founded upon Hoffmann's 
Sangerkrieg, and a poem by Ludwig Tieck, from both of 
which sources Wagner drew in writing the libretto. The 
opera had its first production at the Royal Opera, Dresden, 
on October 19, 1845. 

The action of Tannhauser is laid near Eisenach, in 
Thuringia; the scenes depicted are the mountain retreat 
of Holda, the Teutonic goddess of Spring, who, in the 
early thirteenth century, was already known as the North- 
ern Venus, Goddess of Love; a valley before the Castle 
of Wartburg, where the knightly contests of song were 
held; the interior of the castle; and, finally, the Wartburg 
Valley, before referred to. 

In the opening scene of the first act, Tannhauser, a 
minstrel knight of the Wartburg, is seen lying at the 
feet of Venus, having left the world outside and has 
spent a year in the wicked delights of the Court of the 
Goddess of Love, with its orgies of sensualism, which 
are vividly typified by a series of Bacchanalian dances by 
the ballet. Tannhauser is weary of trie chains that bind 
him to Venus, golden though they may be, and voices 
his longing to return to' his tormer life in the great world 
outside. \ enus endeavors, with all her blandishments, to 
hold him captive, but 'ljannhauser refuses to remain, and, 
at the end 01 a highly dramatic scene, he invokes tne aid 
of the Virgin, the mother of God; in a crash of thunder, 
Venus and all her devotees, and even the grotto disap- 
pear, as if by magic. 

in the second part of the first act, Tannhauser is seen 
kneehng beiore a cross planted in the \ alley of the 
Wartburg, with the Castle in the background on a lofty 
eminence, lie hears the voices of a band of pilgrims on 
their way to Rome; their chanting awakes in him a desire 
to join them in their journey to the Eternal City, where 
he may obtain forgiveness for his sin in succumbing to 
tlie temptations of Venus. His meditations are interrupted 
by the entrance of the Landgrave of Thuringia, and a 
group of Minstrel Knights; they recognize him, and try 
to persuade him to return to the Wartburg with them; 
their pleas, however, fail upon deaf ears, until Wolfram, 
one of the Knights, tells Tannhauser that, since his 
departure, Elizabeth, the Landgrave's niece, with whom 
Tannhauser had been in love, had fallen ill. At the 
mention of her name, all his old love for her is re- 
kindled, and to the great joy of the Knights, Tannhauser 
agrees to return to the Castle, the scene of his many 
triumphs as a Minstrel Knight. 

The next act shows the great hall of the Castle of 
Wartburg, where the contests of song are held. Elizabeth 
enters and joyously sings the great aria beginning "Dich 
theure Halle" ("Thee, dear Hall"). As Wolfram and 
Tannhauser come upon the scene, the latter is welcomed 
by Elizabeth with evident happiness and joy over his 
return. The Knights and guests of the Landgrave take 
their places as the Lapdgrave announces that the con- 
test will be upon the subject of the power of love, and, 
feeling sure that Tannhauser will be the winner, intimates 
that he will bestow- the hand of his niece upon the victor. 
The Knights sing in order as they are called; Wolfram 
extols the ideal of pure love; Walther expatiates upon a 
similar theme, and Biterolf sings of Knightly chivalry. 
All three are interrupted by Tannhauser, until at last, 
Tannhauser, enraged by the sympathy of the assembled 
company for the sentiment.- expressed by the singers, bursts 
out into a wild, exultant pa;an of praise to Venus, in 
which he extols her, and tells the Knights that only 
who have known her are qualified to speak of love. 



At this juncture, the Knights draw their swords and rush 
upon Tannhauser to kill him for his blasphemy and his 
insults to Elizabeth. Elizabeth, however, rushes to his 
defense, and saves him from the infuriated Knights. As 
the Knights fall back, Tannhauser, realizing his position, 
and deeply repentant, falls at the feet of the princess 
and pleads for forgiveness. The Landgrave now inter- 
poses and sternly tells Tannhauser that he must seek 
pardon for his sins by prayers and penitence and that 
he must join a band of pilgrims journeying to Rome, 
there to plead with the Pope for forgiveness. As the 
chant of the penitents is heard, Tannhauser rushes away 
to join them. 

The third act again shows the Valley of the Wart- 
burg. Elizabeth kneels before a shrine, as she has done 
every day during the year since Tannhauser's departure, 
awaiting the return of the pilgrims, praying that Tann- 
hauser will be among them, cleansed of his sins, never 
to leave her again. Wolfram enters upon the scene, 
and although he deeply loves Elizabeth, and desires her 
for himself, he unselfishly joins his prayers with hers 
that her lover may be restored to her. The sound of the 
Pilgrim's Chorus is heard, and as the returning wanderers 
pass by, weary and spent by the long journey on foot, 
Elizabeth and Wolfram stand aside, eagerly scanning each 
figure, in the hope that they may recognize Tannhauser, 
but in vain; Tannhauser has not returned. Elizabeth, 
overcome with despair, sinks before the shrine and, in 
agony, prays to the Virgin for release from life, and 
intercedes for the lost sinner, still a wanderer. Slowly 
arising, she weakly makes her way toward the Castle, 
bidding farewell to Wolfram. He watches her as she 
goes and in sorrow he meditates upon her sad fate. As 
the twdlight fails, and the stars of the evening appear, 
he takes his harp and sings a song of exquisite beauty, 
"O, du mein holder Abendstern," which is rather freely 
translated in the English version as "O, thou sublime 
sweet evening star." While this beautiful song is 
addressed to the evening star, it is really meant to 
apostrophise Elizabeth. It is, without doubt, one of the 
most effective numbers ever written for the baritone 
voice. As Wolfram's song ends, Tannhauser appears, 
but so worn and exhausted that Wolfram hardly recog- 
nizes him. Tannhauser is bent upon returning to Venus, 
but Wolfram bars his way and asks for an account of his 
journey. Tannhauser tells of his sufferings ami his 
appeal to the Pope for pardon for his sin in wasting a 
year of his life at the Horselberg with the Goddess. He 
relates how the Holy Father rose in horror at his recital 
and told him that forgiveness was as impossible as for 
the wooden staff in his hand to blossom with flowers. 

As Tannhauser turns away, convinced that neither in 
this world nor in the world to come can he hope to 
again meet Elizabeth, Wolfram urges him to still further 
mortify his desires, but Tannhauser calls upon Venus to 
guide him to her mountain home. Suddenly she appears, 
with all her nymphs and the denizens of her abode, and 
holds out her arms in welcome. Tannhauser is about to 
rush toward her, and as Wolfram seizes his arm to stay 
him, the sound of a funeral chant is heard, and a group 
of minstrels approaches, bearing a bier upon which lies 
Elizabeth, dead. As Tannhauser stands, overcome with 
emotion, Wolfram tells him of Elizabeth's constant prayers 
for his salvation and encourages him in the thought that 
through the intercession of the saintly Elizabeth, he may 
yet be granted absolution for his sins. Hope again arises 
in Tannhauser's breast and as he turns away from 
Venus, she arid her court vanish. The procession 
approaches and Wolfram asks the Knights to uncover 
the face of Elizabeth. Tannhauser sinks to his knees 
beside her, and, pleading again for forgiveness, dies, just 
as the band of pilgrims approaches with the Pope's abso- 
lution, and carrying with them the wooden staff which 
now is miraculously bearing leaves and flowers. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA— SEASON 1931-1932 
THURSDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 29, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

ELEKTRA 

OPERA IN ONE ACT 

First Performance in Philadelphia in the Original German Text 
By Hugo von Hofmannsthal 

The Music by RICHARD STRAUSS 

CLYTEMNESTRA MARGARET MATZENAUER 

ELEKTRA ANNE ROSELLE 

CHRYSOTHEMIS CHARLOTTE BOERNER 

AEGISTHUS BRUNO KORELL 

ORESTES NELSON EDDY 

PRECEPTOR OF ORESTES WALTER VASSAR 

CONFIDANT OF CLYTEMNESTRA MARIE EDELLE 

TRAIN BEARER EDWINA EUSTIS 

YOUNG SERVANT DANIEL HEALY 

OLD SERVANT ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

MISTRESS OF MAIDS IRRA PETINA 

FIRST MAID ROSE BAMPTON 

SECOND MAID VIRGINIA KENDRICK 

THIRD MAID PACELI DIAMOND 

FOURTH MAID MARIE EDELLE 

FIFTH MAID HELEN JEPSON 

Six Maid Servants: Martha Everett, Charlotte Lockowitz, Mary Foster, 

Bertha Schlessinger, Irene Jacoby, Josephine Beale. 

The scene is laid in Mycenae, in Ancient Greece. 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Conductor ALB2RTO BIMONI 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

The Amplification System used is installed by courtesy of the Electrical Research Products, Inc., New York, under 
the supervision of Joseph Maxfield. 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn &? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 



X 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 



Elektra 

By Richard Strauss 

It is of interest to note that this grim tragedy of ancient 
Greece has not been presented in Philadelphia since 
February 5, 1910, when a French version, with text by 
Henri Gauthier-Villars was produced by the Manhattan Opera 
Company, under the direction of Oscar Hammerstein. As 
this evening's performance is given here for the first time 
in the original German text by Hugo von Hofmannsthal, 
in which the opera had its premiere in Dresden, on Jan- 
uary 25, 1909, the present production is therefore an event 
of importance in the music annals of this city. 

The orchestration is unusually heavy, and requires a num- 
ber of instruments not ordinarily employed in operatic 
works; the number of musicians required is so great (ninety- 
six members of the Philadelphia Orchestra) that several 
rows of seats in the Parquet had to be removed in order 
to accommodate this large body of players. The demands of the 
score upon the principal singers arc tremendous, and only 
artists of the highest standard of musicianship can success- 
fully cope with the difficulties of the music allotted to 
their respective roles. 

The opera is in one act, and the scene is laid in the 
inner court of a palace in Mycenae, in the Greece of 
mythology. King Agamemnon has been murdered by his 
wife, Clytemnestra and her paramour Aegisthus, who have 
seized the reins of power. 

As the scene opens, I servants are gossiping over the actions 
of Elektra, one of the three children of Agamemnon and 
Clytemnestra, the otaer two being Orestes, a son, and 
Chrysothemis, anothei daughter. They say that she acts 
like a wild beast, brooding over her father's murder and 
concocting schemes of vengeance on his destroyers. 

As Elektra passes through the courtyard, the chatter of 
the servants becomes so noisy that one of the overseers 
orders them to their quarters and hurries their departure 
by the use of his whip. Elektra reappears and in wild 
despair calls upon thi shade of her father to come to her, 
while she gloats upoil the thought of the victims who will 
be sacrificed at his tomb. 

Elektra's sister, Chrysothemis, who is utterly unlike her, 
enters and informs her that Aegisthus and Clytemnestra 
have decided to cast Elektra into prison. Elektra, half mad 
with grief and thoughts of revenge, begs Chrysothemis to 
support her in her plans to wreak vengeance on the mur- 
derers of their father. But Chrysothemis desires not blood- 
md strife, longing only for the joys of wifehood and 
of motherhood. She. begs her sister to give up her wild 



plots, but Elektra, scornfully, berates her gentler sister for 
her softness, and dramatically reiterates her vows of retribu- 
tion and vengeance as their mother approaches. 

Clytemnestra speaks to her companion and her train- 
bearer about Elektra. They endeavor to detain her, but 
she is suspicious of them and comes to talk to Elektra. 
She relates her horrible dreams and implores Elektra to tell 
her of some relief; in her abject terror she says she will 
make any sacrifice to appease the anger of the gods, and 
finally virtually confesses that she killed Elektra's father, 
King Agamemnon. Elektra adds to the Queen's terror by 
graphically depicting the punishments to be meted out by 
the gods, of which she herself hopes to be the instrument. 
While Elektra is at the climax of her rage, Clytemnestra's 
companion hurriedly appears and slyly tells the Queen that 
her plan to have her son Orestes killed, has been success- 
ful. Clytemnestra and Aegisthus, both fearing Orestes, had 
banished him, and plotted to have him forever silenced. 
The news of the success of their scheme makes a decided 
change in the Queen's demeanor; she appears happy and 
exultant, and Elektra is at a loss to understand the reason 
for the new attitude of her mother, but when Chrysothemis 
enters and tells her of the death of Orestes, her fury- 
knows no bounds, and again she pleads with her sister to 
help her in the punishment of those responsible for the 
deaths of her father and brother. Chrysothemis, however, 
refuses, and Elektra, in a paroxysm of rage, digs like a 
wild animal at the soil of the courtyard, to unearth the axe 
of death. 

She is interrupted by the entrance of a stranger, who dis- 
closes himself to her as Orestes, and tells her that he had 
caused the rumor of his death to circulate in order to give 
their mother a sense of security from his revenge. Elektra 
tells Orestes of the Queen's admission that she had com- 
passed the death of their father, and Orestes, now nerved 
to desperation, rushes into the palace. Elektra now wildly 
exultant, runs to and fro in front of the door; a wild 
shriek of terror is heard within the palace and the servants 
hasten in; Aegisthus, who has also heard the Queen's 
scream, hurries across the courtyard. Elektra salutes him 
with mocking deference as the monarch. Orestes meets him 
just inside the door; they struggle for a moment and 
Aegisthus falls dead at the hands of Orestes, who has just 
killed his mother. 

Chrysothemis calls Elektra to come to her, as she has 
discovered that the murderer of Clytemnestra and Aegisthus 
is their brother, Orestes. Elektra, her reason overthrown, 
begins a triumphant dance of death and enjoins all the 
people to join her. At its climax, she sways and falls 
lifeless, as the curtain descends. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



GRAND OPERA— SEASON 1931-1932 
THURSDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 5, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

MADAMA BUTTERFLY 

OPERA IN TWO ACTS 

Founded on the Book of John Luther Long and the Drama of David Bclasco 

(In Italian) 

The Music by GIACOMO PUCCINI 

CIO-CIO-SAN HITZI KOYKE 

SUZUKI PACELI DIAMOND 

KATE FINKERTON HELEN JEPSON 

LIEUTENANT PINKERTON, U. S. N DIMITRI ONOFREI 

U. S. CONSUL SHARPLESS NELSON EDDY 

GORO « ALBERT MAHLER 

THE BONZE IVAN STESCHENKO 

PRINCE YAMADORI 



THE IMPERIAL COMMISSIONER 



1 

THE OFFICIAL REGISTRAR WALTER VASSAR 

TROUBLE (Cio-Cio-Sans child) ROSALIE WILSON 

The Scene is laid in Nagasaki, Japan, at the Present Time. 

CONDUCTOR ALBERTO BIMBONI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I — The garden ol Cio'Cio-San's house. 
ACT II — Scene 1 — A room in Cio-Cio'San's house — Night. 
Scene 2 — The same — Dawn of the next day. 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOW'SKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Conductor ALBERTO BIMONI 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn &? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Hcppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 



* AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 



Madama Butterfly 

By Gvacorno Puccini 

MADAMA BUTTERFLY, the sixth in order of 
composition, ol the works of Giacomo Puccini, 
holds first place in popular favor, and bids fair to 
retain that position as long as the school of opera 
of which Puccini was such a prominent exponent, 
shall endure. 

It had its first presentation in Milan, at La Scala, 
on February 17, 1904, and like many other composi' 
tions which afterwards achieved a permanent place 
in the repertoire of the leading opera houses of the 
world, was a dismal failure, notwithstanding the 
fact that the production enlisted the services of such 
distinguished artists as Storchio as CiO'Cio-San, 
Zenatello as Pin\erton, and De Luca as Sharpies*. 
with Cleofante Campanini as conductor. 

It is related that Madame Storchio, overcome by 
the jeers of the a.idience, dissolved into tears, and 
all the participants in the fiasco were utterly dis- 
couraged, with the exception of the composer, who, 
knowing that in the score he had written some of 
his most beautiful music, set promptly to work on 
its revision. After four months, during which 
Puccini made many changes in the score, it was 
again presented oa May 28th, at Brescia and was 
received with an enthusiasm which set the seal of 
approval upon the iwork and amply justified Puccini's 
confidence in the appeal which the story and the 
music hold, and which, as has been said before, 
gives to the opera a preeminent place in public 
favor. 

One of the causes of its failure at its premiere, 
was the extreme |ength of the second act, which, 
at that time, was not divided into .two scenes, as is 
the case in the revised version. This long second 
act was practically rewritten by Puccini, and many 
passages were added, notably the aria sung by 
Pin\erton in the final scene. 

It may be of interest to note that the original 
source of the Puccini work was a short story by 
John Luther Long, of Philadelphia, which deals with 



a young American naval officer, who, while sta' 
tioned at Nagasaki, made a Japanese "contract 
of marriage" with a beautiful young Geisha girl, 
who entered into the alliance as binding upon her 
for all time, but which he regarded as a merely 
ephemeral affair, to he broken off at will. 

The Long story was dramatized by David Belasco, 
with the cooperation of its author, and on March 
5, 1900, it was presented, with phenomenal success, 
at the Herald Square Theatre, in New York City, 
and played for many months to "capacity" houses. 
During the following year, it was produced at the 
Duke of York's Theatre, in London, where it 
achieved a success which equalled, if not surpassed 
that of its presentation in New York. 

Puccini saw the play in London, and was so im- 
pressed with its possibilities as a setting for an 
operatic work, that he engaged Luigi Illica and 
Giuseppe Giacosa to write the Italian book, and 
immediately began work upon the score, which 
now, in its present form, after the changes follow- 
ing its disastrous first production, is regarded by 
many authorities in the world of music as the finest 
example of Puccini's work. 

In MADAMA BUTTERFLY, Puccini has given 
to the world an exotic tone color which Verdi to 
some extent approaches in AIDA, but in which 
only here and there are suggestions of Egyptian 
themes, and while the music of MADAMA 
BUTTERFLY is not essentially Japanese, and the 
great climaxes are typically Italian in effect, yet 
beneath all is the under-current of Nippon, both 
in dramatic expression and musical treatment. 

Some of the most beautiful music ever written is 
to be found in the score of MADAMA BUTTER- 
FLY. The love duet in the first act, sung by Cio- 
Cio-San and Pin\erton, is an exquisite expression 
of love and tenderness: Cio-Cio-San's entrance 
music, the well-known "Un Bel Di Vedremo," or, 
as it is usually rendered in English, "One Fine 
Day," the lovely crooning far away chorus which 
closes the first scene of the second act, the flower 
duet, sung by Cio-Cio'San and Suzu\i, and Cio- 
CiO'San's music in the tragic final scene are all 
brilliant gems in the crown of Puccini's genius. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



GRAND OPERA— SEASON 1931-1932 
THURSDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 12, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

LA TRAVIATA 

Opera in Four Acts 

Text by Francesco Maria Piave: adapted from the drama. "La Dame aux Camelias." 

by Alexandre Dumas, Jr. 

(In Italian) 
Music by GIUSEPPE VERDI 

VIOLETTA VALERY JOSEPHINE LUCCHESE 

ALFREDO GERMONT DIMITRI ONOFREI 

GIORGIO GERMONT , ROBERT STEEL 

GASTONE DE LETOR1ERES ALBERT MAHLER 

BARON DOUPHOL ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

MARQUIS D'OBIGNY CONRAD THIBAULT 

DOCTOR GRENYIL ENRICO GIOVANNI 

FLORA BEP.VOIX HELEN JEPSON 

ANNINA PACELI DIAMOND 

GIUSEPPE ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Incidental Dances by Corps de Ballet 

CONDUCTOR ALBERTO BIMBONI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I, — Salon in the house of Violetta. 
ACT II. — Room in a country house near Paris. 
ACT III. — Ballroom in the house of Flora. 
ACT IV. — Violetta's bed-chamber. 



Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Conductor ALBERTO BIMONI 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL. Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn 6? Son, Philadelphia. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company. 20th and DeLancey Streets. Philadelphia. 

Flowers and Plants by H. H. Battles, 114 South 12th Street, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 



X 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 



La Traviata 

By Giuseppe Verdi 

The music of "La Traviata" was written by Giuseppe 
Verdi, who is universally acknowledged as the greatest 
of all Italian composers of opera, and if public approval 
can be taken as a fitting measure of pre-eminence in any 
field of endeavor, he must be crowned as the king of all 
composers of all time and of all schools of opera. It may 
be fitting to here observe that this great genius, who was 
later to give to the world some of its most beautiful music, 
was refused admissicm to the Conservatory of Music at 
Milan, on the ground that he lacked sufficient musical 
talent. 

The text of the opera was adapted by Francesco Maria 
Piave, from the drama by Alexandre Dumas, Jr., "La 
made famous by Sarah Bernhardt, 
Morris and other illustrious queens 
and known to English and American 



Dame aux Camelias,' 
Eleonora Duse, Clara 
of the dramatic ^tage. 



audiences under its English title, "Camille." 



"La Traviata" was 
Venice, on March 6 
which afterwards ach 
which was due rather 
of the music; the Vio 
Donatelli, was unust 
dying of a wasting 
laughter and drowne< 
moreover, Alfredo, in 
greatest tenors of the 
the eminent baritone 



arranged for a rehea 
was again presented 
brilliant success, and 
a prominent place in 



The story of the 
drama, the names of 



first produced at the Fcnice Theatre. 
1853, and like many other works 
eved success, was a complete fiasco, 
to its interpreters than to any fault 
etta of the occasion, Signora Salvini- 
ally stout and when she sang of 
disease, the audience burst into 
the singers with cries of derision; 
the person of Graziani, one of the 
day, had a bad cold, and Varesi, 
who appeared as Georgio, the father 
of Alfredo, sulked be> ause he considered the role beneath 
his dignity. However, Verdi was not discouraged, and 
ing of the opera: one year later it 
n the same theatre and achieved a 
since that time "La Traviata" holds 
he roster of works which have been 
acclaimed by countle; 5 thousands of opera devotees the 
world over. 

opera follows closely the Dumas 
the characters being the only im- 
portant changes; Marguerite Gauthier of the play be- 
comes Violetta Valery of the opera, and in both the 
drama and the opera the character is one which enlists 
the sympathy of all auditors — a frail woman redeemed 
by the power of love and self-sacrifice. 

Violetta Valery is a notorious courtesan of Paris, who 
falls deeply in love v ith Alfredo Germont, a young man 
front Provence, who h.js come to Paris to seek his fortune; 
lure he rapidly drifts into a dissolute and vicious life. 
With a party of his fiends he attends a party given by 
Violetta; he meets her and is strongly attracted to her 
and urges her to gi"e up the dazzling whirl of false 
pleasures in which si e lives and leave Paris with him. 
She finally consents a;|id they arrange to quit the city and 
repair to a little plac ( in the country. 

The second act shows the interior of a small villa in 
rural France; Alfredo has learned that Violetta had sold 
all her possessions in order to procure this idyllic home, 
where they are living quietly and happily, and goes to 
Paris to redeem her property. During his absence, his 
father, Giorgio Germont, appears upon the scene and 
pleads with Violetta t) give up Alfredo, telling her that 



the happiness of Alfredo's young sister is involved — that 
she is betrothed to a young man whose family would 
break the engagement if the liason between Violetta and 
Alfredo should come to their knowledge. After an affect- 
ing scene between the elder Germont and Violetta, she 
consents to leave Alfredo. She writes a letter, which she 
leaves for Alfredo, in which she pretends that she has 
wearied of him and their life together, and intimates 
that she intends to return to her former companions and 
the gay life of Paris. Alfredo returns, finds the letter, 
and after a dramatic scene with his father, rushes off 
to seek Violetta in Paris, as the act ends. 

Act three finds Violetta the centre of attraction at a 
ball given by Flora Bervoix, one of her old friends. 
Alfredo upbraids her for her desertion and pleads with 
her to return to him. Although she longs to resume 
her life with him, she remembers her promise to his 
father and pretends to Alfredo that she has found a 
new love in Baron Douphol. Alfredo, who has been 
successful at the gaming tables, wildly denounces Violetta 
before all the guests and flings his winnings at her feet ; 
Baron Douphol here interferes and challenges Alfredo 
to a duel, while the guests rebuke him for his insults 
to Violetta. During this scene the elder Germont ap- 
pears, and, knowing how unjust has been Alfredo's atti- 
tude towards Violetta, threatens to disown him for his 
conduct. Alfredo, now realizing how shamefully he has 
acted, repentently turns to his father, who leads him 
away as Violetta collapses. 

The last act shows Violetta in her apartment, watched 
over by Annina, her faithful maid. Doctor Grenvil enters 
and tells Annina that Violetta has only a few- hours to 
live. Just at this juncture a letter is brought to Violetta; 
it is from Alfredo's father and informs her that Alfredo 
has been told of her great sacrifice and that he is on his 
way to join her. Alfredo arrives and throws himself 
at her feet, asking forgiveness for his distrust of her. 
Violetta, forgetting for the moment how ill she is, plans 
with Alfredo for their reunion, but exhausted with joy, 
she sinks unconscious, as Doctor Grenvil and Alfredo's 
father enter the room, the latter bitterly regretting the 
suffering he has caused her. Violetta, the frail woman, 
purified by love and sacrifice, dies in the arms of her 
distracted lover as the opera ends. 

"La Traviata" is filled with beautiful music, but space 
limitations make it impossible to refer to but a few of 
the gems which shine dazzlingly from the score. Some 
of the best known numbers include the following: a 
sparkling drinking song for Alfredo, in which Violetta 
and the chorus join; a brilliant aria for Violetta, begin- 
ning "Ah, fors'e lui," which is sung by every coloratura 
soprano in the world; another favorite coloratura aria is 
the gay and carefree "Sempre libera," sung by Violetta; 
the character of Giorgio Germont has the sonorous "Di 
Provenza il mar", this is one of the outstanding numbers 
of the opera; the pathetic "Addio del passato" sung by 
Violetta as she feels the near approach of death, and the 
thrilling duet between Alfredo and Violetta, "Parigi, 
o cara, noi lasceremo," both of which occur near the 
close of the opera; all these and many more combine to 
make music that is in keeping with the story and its 
setting; it is full of life, it is graceful, it is gentle, 
and in the climaxes it is also highly dramatic. When 
it is taken into consideration that the composer wrote 
the entire score in less than four weeks, one pauses to 
give thought to the greatness of the genius of Giuseppe 
Verdi, who, as has been said before, is certainly the 
king of composers of Italion opera, if not, indeed, 
monarch of all schools of the art of the lyric stage. 






GRAND OPERA— SEASON 1931-1932 
Thursday Evening, November 19, 1931, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

WOZZECK 

From the Drama by GEORG BUCHNER 

(In German) 

The Music by ALBAN BERG 

MARIE ANNE ROSELLE 

WOZZECK IVAN IVANTZOFF 

THE CAPTAIN BRUNO KORELL 

THE DOCTOR IVAN STESCHENKO 

ANDRES SERGEI RADAMSKY 

THE DRUM-MAJOR NELSON EDDY 

FIRST ARTISAN ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

SECOND ARTISAN BENJAMIN DE LOACHE 

THE IDIOT ALBERT MAHLER 

A SOLDIER GEORGE GERHARDI 

MARGRET EDWINA EUSTIS 

MARIE'S CHILD DORIS WILSON 

Soldiers — Artisans — Youths — Girls — Children 

CONDUCTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

CHORUS MASTER ANDREAS FUGMANN 

The orchestra comprises the entire personnel of one hundred and sixteen members of the 

Philadelphia Orchestra: the stage band of twentyfive is composed 

of musicians selected from The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 

Scenery and Costumes Designed by 

ROBERT EDMOND JONES 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios 
Costumes by Van Horn is 1 Son 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I 
Scene 1 — The Captain's Room 
Scene 2 — Open Country 
Scene 3 — Marie's Room. 
Scene 4 — The Doctor's Study 
Scene 5 — A Street in Front of Marie's House 

ACT II 

Scene 1 — Marie's Room 

Scene 2 — A Street in the City 

Scene 3 — A Street in Front of Marie's House 

Scene 4 — An Inn Garden 

Scene 5 — The Guard-room of the Barracks 

ACT III 
Scene 1 — Marie's Room 
Scene 2 — A Wood-path Near a Pond 
Scene 3 — A Tavern 
Scene 4 — A Wood-path Near a Pond 
Scene 5 — A Street in Front of Marie's House. 



SPECIAL NOTICE 
As there will be no pauses in the music by the orchestra during changes of scene, it 
is earnestly requested that there be no applause during the orchestral interludes. 
There will be short intermissions between the acts. 

In order to preserve intact the visual and aural impression of Wozzeck as an art- 
work, there will be no curtain calls after the performance. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE STORY OF 

WOZZECK 



WOZZECK, by Alhan Berg, is set to the drama by Georg Biichner, the manuscript of 
which was lost for nearly forty years after the writer's death in 1837. The story is a curious 
mingling of fantastic imaginings, stark realism, intense tenderness and murderous brutality. 

WOZZECK takes its title from the name of one of the principal characters, a wretched 
private soldier, who is the subject of everyone's abuse: ignorant, superstitious and filled with fear 
of the supernatural. 

He is the victim of a rascally military DOCTOR, who uses him as the subject of all sorts 
of crazy mediaal experiments, to which WOZZECK submits for the few pennies it adds to his 
pay, all of which he gives to MARIE, his mistress, and the mother of his child. 

MARIE is unfaithful to WOZZECK, succumbing to the charms of the DRUM-MAJOR, 
who lures herefrom WOZZECK by his gorgeous uniforms and splendid physique. WOZZECK 
is first apprised of MARIE'S defection by the CAPTAIN and afterwards by the DRUM- 
MAJOR himself, who boasts of his conquest. 

MARIE, stricken by remorse for her wickedness, reads from her Bible the story of the 
repentant Majdalen and tells her little one a story of an imaginary child that had lost both 
parents, in on : of the most effective scenes in the opera. 

WOZZECK induces MARIE to walk with him in the woods; his words and demeanor alarm 
her and she attempts to escape. He stabs her and as MARIE dies, he staggers off. 

WOZZECK seeks momentary relief in drink. He meets MARGRET, a friend of MARIE, 
in a tavern. She sees blood on his hands and becomes terrified; a crowd gathers and 
WOZZECK dees. 

WOZZECK returns to the woods to hunt for the knife; he finds it and flings it into a 
pond. Thinking it may have fallen too close to the shore, he wades into the water and while 
searching for tjhe knife, drowns. 

MARIE'S little boy is riding his hobbyhorse in front of his mother's house; children are 
playing about and shouting; one of them rushes up and tells the child the news of his mother's 
tragic end. He seems not to grasp the significance of what has happened, but still playing, as 
the children rush away in morbid curiosity toward the pond, he gazes after them for awhile and 
then follows them on his hobby horse, as the opera ends. 



A detailed synopsis of WOZZECK and a complete English translation of the original 
German text, prepared by Alfred Reginald Allen, are included in a Souvenir Programme which 
is on sale in the Lobby; these Souvenir Programmes may also be procured at the office of the 
Philadelphia Grand Opera Company, 1616 Walnut Street; Presser's (George T. Haly), 1712 
Chestnut Street; Elkan-Vogel Company, 1716 Sansom Street, and Wanamaker's Sheet Music 
Department. 



METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE 

GRAND OPERA SEASON 1931-1932 
GIULIO GATTI-CASAZZA-GENERAL MANAGER 

TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 24, 1931, AT 8.30 O'CLOCK 

(Late comers will not be seated until after the end of the first act) 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok Mrs. Joseph Leidy Mrs. William C Hammer 

Chairman President Director 

William C. Hammer. General Manager 

WOZ^ECK 

FROM THE DRAMA BY GEORC Bl'CHNER 
( IN" GERMAN I 

MUSIC by AIBAN BERG 

FIRST PRESENTATION IN NEW YORK WITH THE FOLLOWING CAST 

MARIE ANNE ROSELLE 

WOZZECK IVAN IVANTZOFF 

THE CAPTAIN BRUNO KORELL 

THE DOCTOR IVAN STESCHENKO 

ANDRES SERGEI RADVMSKY 

THE DRUM-MAJOR NELSON EDDY 

FIRST ARTISAN ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

SECOND ARTISAN BENJAMIN DE LOACHE 

THE IDIOT ALBERT MAHLER 

A SOLDIER GEORGE GERHARDI 

MARGRET EDWINA EUSTIS 

MARIE'S CHILD DORIS WILSON 

SOLDIERS. ARTISANS, YOUTHS. GIRLS, CHILDREN 

CONDUCTOR LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

CHORUS MASTER ANDREAS FUGMANN 

The orchestra comprises the entire personnel of one hundred and sixteen members of the Philadelphia 

Orchestra: the stage band of twenty-five is composed of musicians selected from 

The Curtis Symphony Orchestra 

SCENERY AND COSTUMES DESIGNED BY ROBERT EDMOND JONES 

SPECIAL NOTICE 
As there will be no pauses in the music by the orchestra during changes of scene, it is earnestly 
requested that there be no applause during the ochestral interludes. There will be short inter- 
missions between the acts. 

In order to preserve intact the visual and aural impression of Wozzeck as an art-work, there will 
be no curtain calls after the performance. 

PROGRAM CONTINUED ON NEXT PACE 
LIBRETTOS FOR SALE IN THE LOBBY 



r8 stirVan (3 (Oj 

RJJ<3 S 



16 EAST 40TH STREET 

:v&w 7 Vo\iv 




4 THE ^ 



- THAT LADY 




h Ave., New York • Tel. PLaza 3-6930 



slation of the original German text. 

ram which is on sale in the Lobby; 

Philadelphia Grand Opera Company, 

price, 50 cents. 



f Marie's Ho 



use. 



f Marie's House. 

the Barracks. 

a Pond. 

a Pond, 
if Marie's House. 

h 7th Street, Philadelphia 
nestnut Streets, Philadelphia 
my is the Edouard Jules — 
United States 
- eet, Philadelphia 

tan Opera Co. 
WD TIER FLOOR 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, NO 

AT 8.30 o'clock 
GIACOMO PUCCINI'S OP 

LA BOHEME 

(In Italian) 
Mmes. Bori, Guilford. 
MM. Martinelli, Danise, Frigerio, R- 
Malatesta, Windheim, Coscia. 

Conductor, Mr. Bellezz 

THURSDAY AFTERNOON, N( 

AT 2 O'CLOCK 

THANKSGIVING 
SPECIAL MATT 

GIUSEPPE VERDI'S OP 

AIDA 

(In Italian) 

Mmes. Corona, Branzell, Doninelli. 

MM. Lauri-Volpi, Danise, Pinza, M; 

Tedesco. 

Incidental Dances by 
Miss De Leporte and Corps de 

Conductor, Mr. Serafi 

Prices: $1.50 to $5.00 (Tax 

THURSDAY EVENING, NO 1 

AT 8 O'CLOCK 

RICHARD WAGNER'S O] 

TANNHAUSE 

(In German) 
Mmes. Jeritza, Ohms, Lerch. 
MM. Laubenthal. Schorr, Andresen, 
Paltrinieri, Wolfe. 

Incidental Dance by Corps de 1 
Conductor, Mr. Bodanz 

FRIDAY EVENING, NOVE 

at 8.30 o'clock 
GIACOMO PUCCINI'S 01 

MADAMA BUTT! 

(In Italian) 
Mmes. Midler, von Essen, Wells. 
MM. Jagel, Scotti, Bada, Malatesta, 
Quintina. 

Conductor, Mr. Bellez 



SATURDAY AFTERNOON, N 

AT 2 O'CLOCK 

GAETANO DONIZETTI'S 

L'ELISIR D'AM< 

(THE ELIXIR OF LOVE 
(In Italian) 
Mmes. Fleischer, Falco. 
MM. Gigli, DeLuca, Pinza. 

Conductor, Mr. Seraf 

GENERAL ADMISSION SALE BEGIN! 




IT] 



r 

" 

i 



1 

11 1 

■ I, 

'I l 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC » 



GRAND OPERA— SEASON 1931-1932 
Thursday Evening, December 3, 1931, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

WILLIAM C. HAMMER, General Manager 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA 

TRAGEDY IN ONE ACT 

Book by GIOVANNI TARGIONI-TOZZETTI and GUIDO MENASCI 

Adapted from a story by GIOVANNI VERGA 

(In Italian) 

MUSIC BY PIETRO MASCAGNI 

TURIDDU DIMITRI ONOFREI 

ALFIO GIUSEPPE MARTINO-ROSSI 

LOLA IRRA PETINA 

MAMMA LUCIA PACELI DIAMOND 

SANTUZZA BIANCA SAROYA 

The scene is laid in a village in Sicily, on Easter Sunday, at the present time. 

To be followed bv 



GIANNI SCHICCHI 



COMEDY IN ONE ACT 

BOOK BY GIOVACCHINO FORZANO 

(In English) 

MUSIC BY GIACOMO PUCCINI 

GIANNI SCHICCHI NELSON EDDY 

LAURETTA NATALIE BODANSKAYA 

ZITA PACELI DIAMOND 

RINUCCIO ALBERT MAHLER 

GHERARDO DANIEL HEALY 

NELLA IRRA PETINA 

BETTO ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

biMONE PETER CHAMBERS 

MARCO CONRAD THIBAULT 

LA CIESCA MARIE EDELLE 

SPINELLOCCIO BENJAMIN DE LOACHE 

AMANTIO ALFRED DE LONG 

PINELLINO JOHN COSBY 

GUCCIO WALTER VASSAR 

GHERARDINO VITALE ANGELUCCI 

The scene is laid in the Gty of Florence, in 1229. 

CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Conductor ALBERTO BIMBONI 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL. Jr. 

Ass.stant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn &? Son, Philadelphia. 

Furniture and Decorations by Chapman Decorative Company, 20th and DeLancey Streets, Philadelphia. 

Flowers and Plants by H. H. Batt'es, 114 South 12th Street, Ph ; lade'phia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 



X 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 



Cavalleria Rusticana 



Gianni Schicchi 



By Pietro Mascagni 



By Giacoma Puccini 



The music of "Cavalleria Rusticana" was composed 
shortly before 1890 and when in that year the publishing 
house of Sonzogno offered a prize for an opera in one act, 
Mascagni submitted hjis work; it was not written espscially 
for the competition als is generally believed. "Cavalleria" 
won easily and prodticed a sensation when given for the 
first time in the Coatanzi Theatre in Rome on May 17, 
1890. Since that time it has been constantly in the 
repertoire of every great opera company in the world. 
Like many another (operatic masterpiece, the American 
premiere was in Philadelphia, September 9, 1891. 

The immense enthusiasm with which the opera was re- 
ceived produced what has been called "an acute attack of 
Mascagnitis," and the! general characteristics of the work, 
then an entirely new thing in operatic music, were imi- 
tated by composers in all the Latin countries. Its music 
has been severely condemned by some eminent European 
critics, although the directness and strength of the libretto 
were everywhere admitted. In few operas are the music 
and text so closely allied, in spite of all condemnation, the 
opera is still one of the most popular in the repertoire and 
bids fair to remain there indefinitely. 

The Story is from a Sicilian tale by Yerga and is pecu- 
liarly Italian, being a swift-moving drama of love, flirta- 
tion, jealousy and djiath. The piot is very simple, but 
equally powerful and the scene is laid in a Sicilian village 
on Easter Sunday morning. Turiddu, a young Sicilian 
peasant, arrived home [from service, in the army, has found 
that his former sweetheart, Lola, has married Alfio, a 
carter, in his absence.! He consoles himself with Santuzza, 
who returns his love with true S.cilian ardor. Turiddu, 
however, soOn. tires of her and begins a flirtation with 
Lola, who, inspired both by natural coquetry and jealousy 
of Santuzza, again lo »ks upon him with favor. Santuzza, 
seeking to retain, the affection of Turiddu, is violen'tlj 
repulsed and in hot anger, tells the story of the love affair 
of Lola and: Turiddu, to Alfio, Lola's husband. Alfio chal- 
lenges Turiddu to a duel and kills him. 

"Cavalleria Rustic; na" is filled with melodies which 
have become world-famous in the forty years of the 
opera's existence. Tie opening song of Turiddu, sung 
off-stage, the whip-song, "II cavallo scalpita" of Alfio, 
sung upon his entrance and the great choral hymn before 
the doors of the church, blending with the "Regina coeli" 
sung by the choir inside, are among the best numbers of 
the early part of the opera. Following these are Santuzza's 
romanza, "Voi lo sapete," the entrance song of Lola, the 
impassioned duet' ' between Santuzza and Turiddu, the 
story told by the former to Alfio and his promise to 
avenge her. At the close of this, Santuzza and Alfio run 
off the stage and then, in strong contrast to the surge of 
passionate human feeling, which has dominated the opera 
to this point, comes the calm, almost religious intermezzo 
for orchestra al6n«v, played w ith the stage empty. Few 
operatic instrumental compositions have had the vogue of 
this charming number and even fewer have retained that 
vogue for so long. At its close the turmoil is resumed. 
The people come from the church, singing a joyous song, 
which is followed by a drinking-song by Turiddu and the 
chorus. Alfio, invited to drink with them, contemptuously 
refuses and the quarrel starts, ending in the challenge 
and .leath of Turiddu. 



"Gianni Schicchi" is the third opera of a tryptich 
which Puccini wrote after "La Rondine." The tryptich 
consists of three operas each in one act and the orig- 
inal plan of the composer was that they should be per- 
formed in a single evening. This was done at the first 
presentations of the works, but the unevenness of the 
operas, especially the lack of interest in both music and 
story of the second of the three "Suor Angebca" caused 
impresarios to separate them. The first performance of 
the three operas anywhere was at the Metropolitan Opera 
House in New York by the Metropolitan Opera Company 
on December 14, 1918, and they were given at the 
Metropolitan Ooera House in Philadelphia by the same 
company the following week. 

Of the three operas, "Gianni Schicchi" is infinitely 
tin- best. The action is laid in Florence in 12 29, and the 
story is based upon an allusion in Dante's "Divina Corn- 
media." Briefly, the opera tells the story of the rela- 
tives of a wealthy Florentine who has just died, leav- 
ing all his wealth to the church. The relatives persuade 
Gianni Schicchi to assist them and he, impersonating 
the deceased Buoso, calls in a .notary and makes a new- 
will in which he leaves most of the wealth to himself. 
The relatives are exceedingly angry but can do nothing 
on account of the strict laws governing such cases. 

To this little story which is really more complex than 
appears, as there is a love affair between the daughter 
of Gianni and the son of. one of the .relatives, Puccini 
has written the most buoyant music which is to he found 
in any of his operas; indeed, some authorities consider 
it to be in certain respects, especially of orchestration, 
his finest operatic work. In the music the composer has 
caught something of the spirit of "Falstaff" and it was 
a decided departure from his usvial operatic subjects 
which had been heretofore either tragic or sentimental. 
However, in some of the earlier works, Puccini had 
shown himself to be possessed of a keen sense of humor, 
such as the scene of the Sacristan in the first act of 
"Tosca" and in certain parts of "La Boheme." But in 
"Gianni Schicchi" this humor finds full play and the 
composer has rarely given greater characterization music- 
ally than in this comedy. The orchestration and the 
use of the voices in the opening scene in which the rela- 
tives bewail the passing of Buoso and at the same time 
try to find out how he has left his wealth, is a mas- 
terpiece of humor in music. Perhaps the most famous 
single mimical number in the opera is Lauretta's aria 
"Oh, mio babbino caro" if it can be called an aria, as 
the work, following Puccini's general style, has few set 
numbers. 

The tryptich of Puccini was constructed on three tales 
of radically different type. The first of the group "II 
Tabarro" (The Cloak) was taken from Didier Gold's 
"La Houppelande" and is . pure melodrama, but of a 
peculiarly grisly kind to which Puccini has set music of 
great dramatic power. The second, "Suor Angelica," 
is sentimental and weak in character as to story, and 
Puccini, who followed his libretti musically closer than 
almost any other composer, has written music of the 
same character. "Gianni Schicchi" has an astonishingly 
fine libretto in addition to being an intensely humorous 
story in itself, and Puccini has matched it with his music. 



3C AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



GRAND OPERA— SEASON 1931-1932 
THURSDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 10, AT 8 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director 

BORIS GODOUNOV 

Opera in Four Acts with a Prologue 

Founded Upon Poushkin and Karamzin's Historical Drama, "Boris Godounov ,, 

(In Russian) 

Book and Music by MODESTE PETROVICH MOUSSORGSKY 

BORIS GODOUNOV, Tsar of Russia IVAN STESCHENKO 

FEODOR, His Son IRRA PETINA 

XENIA, His Daughter NATALIE BODANSKAYA 

S^eSL? F f eo J or T and Xema i MARIE KOSHETZ 

HOSTESS of the Inn ) 

GREGORY. THE FALSE DMITRI DIMITRI ONOFREI 

PIMEN, An Old Monk NICHOLAS KONRATY 

VARLAAM L, . _, w , S MICHAEL SHVETZ 

MISSAIL \ Va g abond Monks j JOSEF KALLINI 

MARINA MNICHEK, Beloved of Gregory GENIA WILKOMIRSKA 

PRINCE SCHUISKY JOSEF KALLINI 

SCHELKALOV CONRAD THIBAULT 

PRISTAV ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

THE INNOCENT 



THE HERALD ) ALBERT MAHLER 

KRUSTCHOV JOHN COSBY 

LAVITSKY DANIEL HEALY 

CHERNIAKOVSKY WALTER VASSAR 

CONDUCTOR FRITZ REINER 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
Prologue Scene 1 — Courtyard of a Monastery in Moscow. 
Scene 2 — The Kremlin. 

ACT I. Scene 1 — Cell in the Monastery. 

Scene 2 — An Inn near the Frontier. 

ACT II. Apartment of the Tsar in the Kremlin. 

ACT III. Marina's Garden. 

ACT IV. Scene 1 — The Forest of Kromy. 

Scene 2 — Session of the Duma in the Kremlin. 



Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Conductor ALBERTO BIMBONI 

Staee Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor" SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn fe? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 



X 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



5C 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Samuel L. Laciar 



Boris Godoimov 

By Mofleste P^trovich Moussorgsky 



Few works in the history of the opera have had the 
varied experiences which have befallen "Boris Godounov," 
perhaps the most characteristically Russian of all operas, 
as its composer, Modesfe Petrovich Moussorgsky, is now 
generally acknowledged to have expressed the real spirit 
of Russia in his music, more accurately and feelingly 
than any other composar of his race. 

The work is in four acts, with a prologue and eight 
tableaux, being actually a series of pictures from Russian 
history, dealing with the accession to the throne of the 
Tsars by Boris, after the assassination of the Tsarewitch 
Dmitri, a child of six years. Ambition which would 
stop at nothing, combined with remorse for his awful 
deed, are the principal elements of the drama. Like 



most of his compatriot 
for his story, finding it 



literature. The drama, 
in Karamzin's "Historj 



, Moussorgsky went to Poushkin 
in that great poet and dramatists' 



stage work "Boris Godounov," a classic of Russian 



which was founded on materia! 
of Russia" dates from 1824. but 



it was half a century later before the opera was produced. 

The insane cruelty of Ivan the Terrible had deprived 
Russia of almost every strong and independent spirit 
except Boris Godounov a Boyard of Tatar origin. As 
the brother-in-law and Regent of Feodor, the half-witted 
heir of Ivan the Terri )le, Boris was virtually ruler of 
Russia before the ambition to wear the crown himself 
seized him. Only the Six-year-old child Dmitri stood in 
his way. In 15X1 Dmitri was murdered and suspicion 
fell on Boris. He cleverly exculpated himself and later 
was chosen Tsar to succeed Feodor. He ruled wisely, 
but his Nemesis appea 'ed in the person of the monk 
Gregory, the False Duitri, who was eagerly supported 
by the Poles. Boris, who was then near madness with 



the pangs of conscience 
quite resigned themselv 
their allegiance and tl 



, felt that the people who never 
to a Tatar Tsar, wavered in 

e Poles took advantage of this 
situation to advance oiji Moscow. Boris, at this junc- 
ture, was seized with a fatal illness and with his last 
breath appointed his son. also a Feodor, as his successor. 

The prologue opens in the courtyard of the Novo- 
Dievichy monastery in Moscow, where a crowd has gath- 
ered and officers, with I threats and blows, demand that 
they entreat Boris to accept the throne, but he is in no 
haste to reap the fruits of his crime. In the second 
scene, he accepts and the great coronation scene follows 
as he passes from one cathedral to the other, to receive 
his crown. 

The first scene of the first act is in the cell of the 
monk Pimen, where he is writing, while the younger 
monk Gregory lies asleep. The youth awakes and Pimen 
tells him that Boris, the new Tsar, is the murderer 
of the child Dmitri. Old Pimen says that he closed his 
icle with the murder and that Gregory, who is 
the age Dmitri would have been had he lived, should 



continue it. The second scene is in an inn on the 
Lithuanian border. Two vagabond monks enter, followed 
by Gregory, now the False Dmitri. Officers appear with 
i warrant, which Gregory reads, describing Varlaam, the 
elder monk. He is about to be led away, when he asks 
to read the warrant, which proves to be for Gregory, 
who leaps out of the window and escapes. 

The second act opens in the apartments of the Tsar, 
where Boris is with his children, Xenia and Feodor 
and their nurse. II. broods over the misfortunes which 
surround him. the revolt in Poland, the plotting of his 
nobles, the plague and famine that ravish the land. 
Prince Shouisky enters and tells Boris that a pretender 
has arisen in Poland, ami that it is young Dmitri come 
to life. Then follows one of the greatest scenes of the 
opera as Boris overcome with remorse and fear, imagines 
he again sees the murdered Tsarewich. The next aet is 
laid in Marina's garden in Poland, Moussorgsky having 
added it to his original work to secure a "love interest" 
which the directors of the Maryinski Theatre deemed 
imperative. Marina, daughter of a Polish noble, dreams 
of becoming Tsarina, as Dmitri (Gregory) loves her. 
In this scene Dmitri overhears the Poles planning to 
overthrow Boris and Marina urges him to go to Moscow 
at once and seize the throne of Russia. 

The last act opens in the forest of Kromy. This 
scene Moussorgsky originally intended to close the work, 
but was persuaded to insert it ahead of the death of 
Bois on the grounds that it would be an anti-climax in 
tin form in which he planned it. An uprising has 
taken place and the peasants have captured a nobleman- 
and are tormenting him. The vagabond monks appear 
and urge the crowd to overthrow Boris and put Dmitri 
on the throne. Then comes the Village Fool, teased 
by boys and finally Dmitri's troops and himself on horse- 
back. The procession passes leaving the Fool alone in 
a snowstorm and prophesying woe to Russia as he lies 
down in the snow. 

The last scene is in the chamber of the Duma to find 
means of crushing the revolt of Dmitri and is filled with 
"the horror that waits on Princes." The climax has 
been carefully built up with the half-veiled insanity of 
Boris, restrained before the members of the Duma, the 
interview with the aged Pimen who destroys his last 
hope that the child Dmitri might after all, have escaped 
death. At this point Boris shrieks for air and calls 
for his son, who is brought in haste. Having named 
him as the next Tsar, given his advice as to his conduct 
in that exalted place and prayed for his protection, the 
harassed spirit of Boris passes. 

The opera was first presented, at the Maryinski Theatre 
of (then) St. Petersburg, January 24, 1874. and was not 
entirely successful. In 1896 a new version with har- 
monization and orchestration revised by Rimsky-Korsakov 
w-as brought out and this is the now generally accepted 
version. The work in concert form with Moussorgsky's 
original orchestration was produced for the first time in 
America by the Philadelphia Orchestra two years ago i in 
the fall of 1929), and fully vindicated Rimsky-Korsakov's 
judgment in his revision. 



5« AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



GRAND OPERA— SEASON 1931-1932 
SATURDAY MATINEE, DECEMBER 19, AT 2.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director and General Manager 

HAENSEL AND GRETEL 

(In English) 

A FAIRY OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

TEXT BY ADELHEID HUMPERDINCK WETTE 

MUSIC BY ENGELBERT HUMPERDINCK 

HAENSEL PACELI DIAMOND 

GRETEL NATALIE BODANSKAYA 

PETER NELSON EDDY 

GERTRUD MARIE EDELLE 

WITCH EDWINA EUSTIS 

SANDMAN RUTH CARHART 

DEVVMAN EDNA CORDAY 



Followed by the Ballet Spectacle 

DIE PUPPENFEE 

(THE FAIRY DOLL) 



THEIR CHILDREN 



MUSIC BY JOSEF BAYER 

THE TOYMASTER ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

„,. A ec,cT4MXQ (FRANK DAVENPORT 

nia asms i am i 5 j OEO RGE SOUTHERN 

THE POSTMAN FRANK COLKER 

LITTLE GIRL WITH BROKEN DO^L DORIS WILSON 

A PEASANT NICHOLAS POPOV 

A PEASANT GIRL MARGARET MILLER 

THE ENGLISH GENTLEMAN CHARLES HUBBARD 

HIS WIFE KATHRYN McILHENNY 

( CUPIE WOLFF 

) HENRIETTA CONRAD 

1 DORIS WILSON 

( SYLVIA ROSENBAUM 

t-vdoiiam r,™ r c t FLORENCE CAMPBELL 

TYROLIAN DOLLS ) riir-nic ddcweii 

— ( LUCILLE BREMER 

BABY DOLL STELLA CLAUSEN 

GOLLYWOG ELEANOR DEL BUENO 

DnDm .,., nmTC ) DOROTHY RENDELMAN 

PORCELAIN DOLLS > HAROLD TAUB 

SPANISH DOLL MILDRED KAHL 

JACK-IN-THE-BOX JACK POTTEIGER 

MARIONETTE DOROTHY LITTLEFIELD 

PRINCE CHARMING DOUGLAS COUDY 

THE FAIRY DOLL CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

CORPS DE BALLET: MLLES. HOFFMAN, VOSSLER, GEURARD, KARKLINSCH, LE1TCH, MILLER. 

YOUNG. HAINES, SAYRE, PATSY, WOODS, RENNINGER, BECKER, DOLLARTON, MOUNTAIN, 

GRAHM. PORCELAIN, SPANISH, BABY AND TYROLIAN DOLLS, SOLDIERS, Etc. 

CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

BALLET MISTRESS CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Conductor ALBERTO BIMBONI 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn 6? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street. Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Philip L. Leidy 



Haensel and Gretel 

By Engelbert Humperdinck 

Engelbert Humperdinck, the composer of the fairy tale 
opera "Hansel and Gretel," was horn September 1, 1854. 
He studied music in Cologne, Frankfort, Munich and 
Berlin, and in 1880 came under the influence of Richard 
Wagner, who was then writing his opera "Parsifal." 
Humperdinck worked with him until the production of 
"Parsifal" at Bayreuth in 1882, and undoubtedly the 
influence of Wagner is felt throughout the music of 
"Hansel and Gretel" and "Konigskinder." 

"Hansel and Gretel" was first produced in Weimar in 
1893, and in this country at Daly's Theatre, New York 
City, in 1895. 

The story of "Hansel and Gretel" is based upon the 
tale of "The Babes in the Wood," by Jacob and William 
Grimm ("Grimm's Fairy Tales"). The libretto itself was 
written by Adelheid Wette, the sister of the composer, 
who had prepared the story from one of Grimm's fairy 
tales in easy form adaptable to its being given by her 
children on the occasion of the Christmas festivals. She 
asked her brother to write some incidental melodies to 
be played at that time. From this beginning developed 
the final opera, which has become so popular with music 
lovers throughout the world. 

In the first act, which takes place in the forest hut 
of Peter, the broom-maker, the scene opens on Hansel 
and Gretel, who are at work in their home, Hansel 
making brooms and (iretel busily knitting. The children 
play, quarrel, and make up, and Hansel, who is hungry, 
asks when they are going to eat. Gretel tells him that 
one of the neighbors has sent a jug of milk, and they 
dance happily at the thought of the forthcoming meal. 
As they are dancing about the room, their mother, Ger- 
trude, comes in, tired and hungry, and finding that the 
children have been idle, attempts to punish them, and 
in doing so overturns the jug of milk. Realizing that 
all hopes of supper have vanished, she sends the children 
into the forest to pick strawberries, while she herself, 
tired and hungry, sinks exhausted to the ground bemoan- 
ing their poverty. At this time the voice of Peter is 
heard. He enters, singing a riotous song, tipsy as usual. 
However, this time he has brought a basketful of pro- 
visions, and he explains to Gertrude that he has had 
great success at the !Kirmes and bids her prepare the 
supper. He asks for the children, and when Gertrude 
tells him that she has sent them into the forest for 
strawberries he becomes terrified, as there is a wicked 
fairy who lives in }he Forest Ilsenstein who entices 
children to bake them in her oven and devour vhem. 
Gertrude, becoming equally alarmed, rushes off with him 
into the woods to find the children. 

In the second act the children are idling in the woods, 
whither they have wandered. They gather berries and 
weave garlands of flowers, and, after playing about, they 
sit beneath the trees and eat all the berries which they 
have picked. When they realize that the basket is empty, 
which they know they must bring home full, they hunt 
for more berries, but twilight soon overtakes them. Terri- 
fied, they cling to each other, and after a time the 
Sandman, or Sleep Fairy, sprinkles "sand" into their 
eyes and they fall asleep, side by side, while the Slumber 
Angels descend from the clouds by a celestial stairway 
and keep watch over them. 



Morning comes with the third act. The Dewman, or 
Dawn Fairy, sprinkles dew on the children and they 
awake. They suddenly notice a little house made of 
gingerbread. Being hungry, they begin to break off 
little bits, when a voice cries out from within and the 
Witch opens the door. As the children try to escape 
from her, she waves her wand and weaves a spell upon 
them, preventing them from moving, after which she 
binds Hansel and imprisons him in a cage to fatten. 
She forces Gretel to prepare the fire under the oven in 
which she. <lretel, is to be baked. While the fire burns 
brightly, the Witch rides around the skies on her broom- 
stick, chuckling with delight at the forthcoming feast. 

Returning later, the Witch peers inside the oven to 
see if it is sufficiently hot. Gretel, meanwhile, has 
released Hansel from the cage, and the two children 
push the Witch into the oven and shut the door. The 
oven suddenly falls to pieces, and there appears a row 
of boys and girls about the Witch's cottage, they having 
been transformed by the Witch's death from gingerbread 
children into live boys and girls. Gretel breaks the 
spell for them by speaking the magic words of the Witch 
and waving her wand. Peter and Gertrude then appear, 
and having found the children, there is general rejoicing 
as a gigantic gingerbread Witch is pulled out of the 
collapsed oven. The curtain falls while all join in a 
hymn of thanksgiving. 

Humperdinck in this opera discloses a great mastery 
of technique, and in it he has relied extensively upon 
folk tunes. These are extremely beautiful and melodious 
and in many instances can be traced directly to folk 
songs. There is also much to remind us of the Wag- 
nerian influence under whicli he worked so long and so 
assiduously. 



Die Puppenfee 

(The Fairy Doll) Ballet 
Music by Joseph Bayer 

The action of Josef Bayer's ballet pantomime is laid 
in a doll shop in Vienna. As the scene opens, the shop- 
keeper and his assistants are busily engaged in winding 
up the mechanical dolls. Customers stroll in and out, 
and finally a wealthy purchaser comes in to buy a doll 
for his daughter. They sit on a bench while the shop 
keeper exhibits and explains to them the various ad- 
vantages of the toys. Each doll is wound up and put 
through its paces, but none seems to please the would-be 
purchaser. In desperation, the shopkeeper shows him 
his finest doll — the Fairy Doll. For this doll he asks 
a large price, but the child is so entranced by the 
mechanical perfection of the Fairy Doll that her father 
purchases it for her. They leave the doll with the shop- 
keeper for delivery the following morning, and go out 
as the shop is about to close. 

The second scene shows the interior of the shop after 
it has been closed for the night and everyone has gone 
home. The Fairy Doll, at the magic hour of twelve, 
comes down from the cabinet in which she has been 
placed over night, and all the other dolls come to life 
and join her in a beautiful ballet, which . ends just as 
dawn is breaking when all good fairy dolls must return 
to their mechanical selves. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



GRAND OPERA— SEASON 1931-1932 
Thursday Evening, January 7, 1932, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director and General Manager 



TOSCA 



OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

Book by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, after the drama. "La Tosca," 
by Victorien Sardou 

(In Italian) 

Music by GIACOMO PUCCINI 

FLORIA TOSCA BIANCA SAROYA 

MARIO CAVARADOSSI DIMITRI ONOFREI 

BARON SCARPIA JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

CESARE ANGELOTTI PETER CHAMBERS 

A SACRISTAN ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

SPOLETTA ALBERT MAHLER 

SCIARRONE JOHN COSBY 

A GAOLER BENJAMIN DE LOACHE 

A SHEPHERD BOY ROSE BAMPTON 

CONDUCTOR EUGENE GOOSSENS 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I. The Church of Sant" Andrea Delia Valle. 
ACT II. Scarpia's Apartment in the Farnese Palace. 
ACT III. The P:atform of the Castle Sant' Angelo. 



Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Djrector WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian ANDREW LUCK 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn 6? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Hie Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street Philadelphia. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Philip L. Leidy 



LA TOSCA 

By Giacomo Puccini 

Giacomo Puccini, composer of the opera "La 
Tosca," was born on June 22, 1858. He came from 
a distinguished line of music-lovers and composers, 
his K r e at grandfather, grandfather and father in 
turn having written much sacred music, which was 
greatly admired in Italy at that period. With so 
distinguished a genealogy, it is not surprising that 
Puccini should have shown such marked musical 
talent at a tender age. His first opera, "Le Villi, " 
was produced in 1884, and as years passed the 
works of "Edgar," "Manon Lescaut," and "La 
Bohc-me" in 1896 followed upon the heels ol his 
first success. 

Turning from the romantic ta'.es of his last two 
operas, Puccini borrowed from the gruesome play 
of Victorien Sardou, the eminent French writer, 
the plot for his opera "La Tosca." It has often 
been said that the opera might as well, if not 
better, have been named "Scarpia," as the action 
revolves entirely around this sinister character and 
his conspiracies. Th^ libretto was written by Illica 
and Giacosa, and depicts a prolonged orgy of 
passion and crime. 

While the luridne$s of the plot makes musical 

Puccini in a masterly way 

his musical talents. Such 

Jossi's "Recondita armonia" 

in which he discusses the 



interpretation difficul 
gave expression to 
passages as Cavara 
(Strange Harmony), 



his portrait, Scarpi 
Tosca) in the first 
d'amor" (Love and 



more or less technical question of the colors in 



"Tosca Divina" (Divine 
act; Tosca's "Vissi d'arte e 
Music), in which, Tosca's 
spirit broken by Sca^pia's cruelty, she pleads with 
him and tells him h>w her life has been devoted 



to art and music, in 
the entire third act, 



loved one, whom h 
"E lucevan le stelle' 



he second act; and practically 
with such musical gems as 



Cavaradossfs farewell to his dreams of art and his 



his "O dolci mani" (Oh, Gentle Hands) in which. 



after Tosca tells him 



never hopes to see again, 
(The Stars Were Shining), 



of Scarpia's death, he com- 



mends the gentle h inds which struck the blow, 
and the love duet, "Amaru sol per te irfera il 
morire" (The Bitterr ess of Death), are considered 
some of the finest of lyric compositions ever written. 

The plot revolves iround the lustful desires and 
infatuation of Baron Scarpia, the aristocratic but 
ruthless, sensuous and cold-blooded Prefect of 
Police of Rome, for Floria Tosca, a beautiful singer. 



who is betrothed to Mario Cavaradossi, an artist. 
The latter assists in the escape of a political prisoner 
and eventually comes into the toils of Scarpia. In 
order to obtain information as to the escaped 
prisoner, Scarpia has Tosca's lover tortured within 
her hearing, and she, distraught, to save and release 
Cavaradossi, promises herself to Scarpia, who has 
already signed Cavaradossfs death warrant. Scarpia 
gives his henchmen orders for a supposedly sham 
execution and, having delivered a safe conduct to 
Tosca, is stabbed to death by her. The execution 
of Cavaradossi, however, is a real one, and Tosca, 
broken-hearted and in order to escape from arrest 
for the assassination of Scarpia, jumps from the 
parapet of the Castle San Ange'o as the opera ends. 

"La Tosca" was first produced in Rome in 1900, 
and in this country at the Metropolitan, in New 
York, in February of 1901. Such great artists as 
Ternina, Cremonini, Scotti, Gilibert and Dufriche 
interpreted the roles of the more important char- 
acters at the opening performance. 

Written without an overture, three sharp chords, 
the first notes of the opera, denoting the sinister 
and vindictive character of Scarpia, are repeated 
throughout the opera on a number of occasions 
when he appears on the scene. As the words of 
the opera themselves express it, Scarpia is "a 
bigoted satyr and hypocrite, secretly steeped in vice, 
yet most demonstratively pious." Throughout the 
opera, even in the last act after his assassination 
in the second act has taken place, the character of 
Scarpia forms the dramatic background for the action. 

Scemcally the opera is most pleasing to the eye. 
The first act, depicting the Church of Sant' Andrea 
Delia Va'.le with its high vaulted roof, the altar, 
and finally the procession of the Church dignitaries 
and worshipers is most impressive. The third act 
takes place on the platform of the Castle San 
Angelo; in the background St. F'eter's and the 
Vatican are visible. It is at the opening of this 
act, and as the dawn is breaking, that one of the 
finest bits of orchestral music ever written by 
Puccini is heard. The tinkling of sheep bells, the 
song of a shepherd, mingle with a languorous 
orchestral song. Later there arises from a distance 
the sounds of church bells, as the orchestral song 
goes on. It is an intensely refreshing bit of relief 
from the striking music interpreting the horrors 
of the preceding act. 

All in all, it may be said that seldom, if ever, 
has an Italian composer equalled the music of 
"Tosca" in dramatic power and thrill-producing 
succession of chords. 



•X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



GRAND OPERA— SEASON 1931-1932 
Thursday Evening, January 14, 1932, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director and General Manager 



THAIS 



OPERA IN THREE ACTS 
Text by Louis Gallet, Adapted From the Novel "Thais," by Anatole France 

(In French) 

ATHANAEL, a young Cenobite monk JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

NICIAS, a wealthy Alexandrian ALBERT MAHLER 

PALEMON, an aged Cenobite monk IVAN STESCHENKO 

THAIS, an actress BIANCA SAROYA 

CROBYLE, a slave HELEN JEPSON 

MYRTALE, a slave ROSE BAMPTON 

ALBINE, an abbess MAUDE RUNYON 

A SERVITOR BENJAMIN De LOACHE 

BALLET DIVERTISSEMENT IN ACT II, SCENE 2, BY 
CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD, Premiere Danseuse 
DOROTHY LITTLEFIELD, Assyrian Maiden 
DOUGLAS COUDY, THOMAS CANNON, JACK POTTEIGER, Slaves 
Bacchantes, Syrian, Grecian and Rose Maidens by Corps de Ballet 

CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I. Scene 1 — A Camp of the Cenobite Monks on the River Nile 
Scene 2 — Terrace of the House of Nicias in Alexandria 

ACT II. Scene 1 — A Room in the House of Thais. 

Scene 2 — Square Before the House of Thais 

ACT III. Scene 1 — An Oasis in the Theban Desert 

Scene 2 — A Garden of the Convent of the White Sisters 



Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOW8KI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL. Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE REN ARD 

Librarian ANDREW LUCK 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn 6? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 



X 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Philip L. Leidy 



Thais 

By Jules Massenet 



Jules Frederic Emile Massenet, composer of the Opera 
"Thais," was horn May 12, 1842, at Montaud, France, 
at the Paris Conservatoire, where 
numerous prizes for proficiency in 
early came under the influence of 
produced his first opera, "La 



He studied the piano 
from 1859 on he won 
that instrument. He 
Ambroise Thomas, ai 



not until after the eff 
Massenet really began 
to 1881 he wrote se 
compositions. In 188 
ade," was produced in 
favor until after it w 



Grand' tante" at the O >era-Comique in 1867. The Franco- 
Prussian War of 187(1 intervened, however, and it was 
cts of that war had worn off that 
to compose in earnest. From 1872 
era! operas, oratorios, and piano 
his first great success, "Herodi- 
Brussels, although it did not enjoy 
is rewritten by him and produced 



in Paris in 1884. That same year "Manon," and in 1885 



"Le Cid," were added 
he produced his opera ' 
in 1892 "Werther" 
"Thais" was produced 

The opera "Thais" 
view to providing the 
with a role worthy of 
called a lyric comedy 
ther from the actual 
opera, in three acts ar 
last act is given in th 
ten by Louis Gallet, ai 
France. 

The action takes pi; 
banks of the Nile 



to his list of successes. In 1889 
Esclarmonde," in 1891 "Le Mage." 
nd "Le Carillon," and in 1894 
at the Opera House of Paris, 
vas composed by Massenet with a 
American singer, Sybil Sanderson, 
her talents. The opera has been 
Nothing, however, could be fur- 
ruth. "Thais" is a tragic grand 
1 six scenes, although at times the 
ee scenes. The libretto was writ- 
El is based on the novel of Anatole 



the fourth century, on the 
the immediate vicinity of Alexan- 
dria. The opening sceie is in the Camp of the Cenobite 
Monks. Athanael, a young monk, who has been to 
Alexandria to preach he gospel, returns to his brother 
monks with stories of J dexandria's wickedness and proflig 
He speaks to thi m particularly of a courtesan re- 
and named Thais. Wearied from 
sleep and has a vision of Thais 
ermines, much against the advice 
of Palemon, an aged l lonk, to proceed to the city in an 
attempt to reform her. 

laid on the terrace of the house 
admirer of Thais. Athanael has 



nowned for her beauty 
his journey, he falls 
Upon awakening he dtt 



The second scene i 
of Nicias, a wealthy 



Nicias greets him, bu 
tells him that he has 
Nicias has squandered 



and has his slaves ar 



former tells her that 



come to see him, havir g known him in his younger days. 



is moved to laughter when he 
ome to reform Thais, upon whom 
a fortune. For the sake of their 



old friendship, howevc r, Nicias agrees to aid Athanael 



ay him in rich robes, concealing 



his monkish habit. T ais arrives, and the would-be re- 



le has come to bring her to the 



only Clod. Thais repli s that her only God is the joy of 



living and of loving. 
while Athanael leaves 
a bacchanalian orgy. 
The first scene of 
apartments of Thais. 
for the moment weari 



still remains 

and hangings. Athan. 

fursake worldly pleasu 



She is none the less impressed, 
shocked by the preparations for 



be second act takes place in the 
>he lies, wearied of the world and 
d with luxury, seemingly stirred 
by memories of the yo ng monk who has come to reform 
her. Nearby is a figut: of Venus, whose priestess Thais 
The roo f is decorated with luxurious rugs 
1 comes to her and urges her to 
es and passions. She is still un- 
willing, but there lurk; in her mind the realization and 
fear that some day lit • beauty must leave her, and yet 
this monk speaks to 1 er of life and beauty everlasting. 



Gradually she is being won over, although still defiant, 
and as Athanael leaves her he tells her that he will wait 
until dawn upon her threshold in order to lead her to a 
convent in the desert. 

The second scene of the same act depicts a square and 
street before the house of Thais. Athanael is still waiting 
for her. while from across the street in the house of 
Nicias sounds of revelry emanate. Suddenly Thais ap- 
pears, repentant and ready to follow her holy guide into 
the desert. She leaves everything behind her except a 
small statue of Eros (Cupid), which she begs Athanael 
to allow her to take with her. He, however, casts the 
statue to the ground, shattering it into pieces. He then 
goes into her palace and sets fire to it and to her mani- 
fold treasures, after which he returns to where Thais is 
waiting, ready to follow him. Nicias appears, having 
won heavily at the games. He orders fresh wine, and 
a beautiful ballet is staged as the revelry is at its height. 
Thais re-enters in the robes of a penitent, accompanied 
by Athanael and her lamenting handmaidens. The revel- 
er- are outraged at the firing of Thais' palace, and 
Nicias, in order to allow Thais and the monk to depart 
in safety, throws gold coins among the crowd and in 
the scramble therefor they escape. 

The third act opens in an oasis in the Theban Desert. 
Thais, fatigued, lies down to rest, while Athanael brings 
water to her. lie is moved to pity at her sufferings, 
and bathes her feet and gives her fruit. He then gives 
her into the care of the Albine nuns, who take her to 
their convent. The last scene of the final act is laid 
in the garden of the Convent of the White Sisters. 
Thais, worn with repentance and self-denial, lies dying. 
Athanael enters and is led to her. He suddenly realizes 
that he loves her, and implores her to return to Alex- 
andria and worldly pleasures. As he kneels before her, 
she tells him of her conversion, and as she points to the 
heavens and tells him she sees the gates of heaven open- 
ing before her and hears the beating of the angel wings, 
her earthly life slips away. 

While it has been said by critics that Massenet's music 
lacks depth and is too saccharine in its sweetness, music 
lovers far and wide have acclaimed "Thais" as one of 
those operas which will survive for many centuries our 
modern tendency towards atonal music. Of course, the 
famous "Meditation," symbolizing the conversion of 
Thais, which is played as an intermezzo between 
the first and second scenes of the second act, is 
one of the best known melodies from this opera. It is 
written for a violin solo, accompanied by harp and strings, 
and recurs again in the oasis scene in the desert. There 
are, however, many other beautiful arias, notably that 
of Athanael as he stands looking at the palace of Nicias 
in the second scene of the first act, wherein he reflects 
upon the terrible city of Alexandria where he was born 
in sin — "Voila done la terrible cite! — Alexandrie, ou je 
suis ne dans le peche; — . Anges du ciel, souffles de 
Dieu, — venez! parfumez du battement de vos ailes — Fair 
corrompu qui va m'environner !" ; the aria of Thais in the 
second act, where she meditates upon her beauty and the 
fact that it must sometime fade. "Ah! dis-moi que je 
suis belle et que je serai belle eternellement !"; Thais' 
invocation to the purity of love in the second scene of 
the second act, when she asks Athanael to allow her to 
take with her the little statue of Eros, "L'amour est une 
vertu rare"; and the closing aria of Thais as she visions 
the gates of heaven opening and the angels beckoning to 
her in the final scene, "Le ciel s'ouvre! — Voici les anges." 

All in all, Massenet has written in this opera some of 
his outstanding melodies, and such as all music lovers 
hope will never die. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA— SEASON 1931-1932 
THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 28, 1932, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director and General Manager 



RIGOLETTO 



OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

Text by Francesco Maria Piave, adapted from the drama "Le Roi S' Amuse," by Victor Hugo 

(In Italian) 

Music by GIUSEPPE VERDI 

THE DUKE OF MANTUA NINO MARTINI (American Debut) 

RIGOLETTO, the Court Jester, a Hunchback JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

SPARAFUC1LE. an Assassin IVAN STESCHENKO 

COUNT MONTERONE PETER CHAMBERS 

BORSA ALBERT MAHLER 

MARULLO CONRAD THIBAULT 

COUN T CEPRANO BENJAMIN DE LOACHE 

AN OFFICER ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

CCL'NTESS CEPRANO VIRGINIA KENDRICK 

A PAGE CAROL DEIS 

GIOVANNI, Companion to Gilda PACELI DIAMOND 

MADDALENA, Sister of Sparafucile EDWINA EUSTIS 

GILDA, Daughter of Rigoletto JOSEPHINE LUCCHESE 

Time — Sixteenth Century Place — Mantua 

Incidental Dance in Act I by Corps dc Ballet 

CONDUCTOR CESARE SODERO 

STAGE DJ RECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I — Room in the Duke's Palace. 

ACT II — Scene 1. House of Rigoletto. 

Scene 2. Room in the Duke's Palace. 

ACT III — Sparafucile's House. 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL. Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE REN ARD 

Librarian ANDREW LUCK 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn &? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3335 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 



X 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Philip L. Leidy 



"Rigoletto" 

By Giuseppe Verdi 

The opera "Rigoletto," by Giuseppe Verdi, was first 
produced in Venice in .March of 1851. The plot of the 
opera is based upon Victor Hugo's play, "Le Roi 
s'Amuse," in which was depicted the pleasure-loving 
Francis I, King of France, and his pursuit of various 
ladies of the court. The libretto of "Rigoletto" was writ- 
ten by Francesco Maria Piave, and was originally called 
by Verdi "La Maledizione." Notwithstanding the fact 
that the title had been changed, the Italian authorities 
refused permission for the performance of a work in 
which a king was portrayed as such a dubious character. 
Venice was then in Austrian hands, and a short time 
previously there had been an Italian revolt. Verdi, how- 
ever, refused to change his libretto and it appeared as 
though the opera would never be performed. Help, how- 
ever, came from an unexpected source. The Austrian 
Piefect of Police, being a lover of music and seeing great 
possibilities in the libretto, suggested the substitution of a 
fictitious Duke of Mantua for Francis I, a change of the 
title lo "Rigoletto," and a removal of the site of the opera 
from Paris to a small Italian dukedom. Verdi willingly 
agreed tc these changes, as they did not in any way affect 
the plot, and within six weeks from the time he originally 
obtained the libretto ; n its changed form, he had written 
the entire opera. 

"Rigoletto" was tin: first opera to spread Verdi's fame 
throughout Europe, although his earlier efforts had made 
him well known in musical circles in Italy. The opera 
is written i;\ three acts and four scenes. 

The tii st act is in the ballroom in the Duke's palace. 
A fete is in progress. The Duke, who is pursuing the 
Countess Ceprano, confides to a courtier that he has be- 
come intrigued by the charms of a lovely unknown, whom 
he has seen leaving church. During the fete the Duke 
dances with the Countess but is watched jealously by her 
husband. Rigoletto, the hunchback jester of the Duke, by his 
biting tongue incites the Count's ire and ridicules his jeal- 
ous disposition. As they leave, Marullo tells the other cour- 
tiers, none of whom have much love for Rigoletto, that the 
latter is in love and pays nightly visits to his sweetheart. 
There is much jeering laughter over the hunchback, who 
takes malicious glee in pandering to the Duke's romances, 
and who has himself now turned Cupid. The Duke returns 
with Rigoletto and Coint Ceprano and in the scene follow- 
ing, Rigoletto arounses the Count's further anger by his 
sarcasm and suggestions of the Countess Ceprano's affair 
with the Duke. Ceprano, maddened, plans with the 
courtiers for vengeance. Matters come to a head, how- 
ever, with the entrance of the Count Monterone, an aged 
courtier, whose wife was an earlier victim of the Duke's 
attentions, and afterwards his daughter. Rigoletto 
ridicules the old mar., and he in turn utters a father's 
malediction against the Duke and the hunchback. This 
provokes a profound sensation even among the hardened 
courtiers and the Dujce, who orders Monterone arrested. 
The old Count is tak^n to prison, but Rigoletto has been 
thoroughly frightened. He is extremely superstitious 
where his own daughter is concerned, for the sweetheart 
of whom Marullo spoke is actually Rigoletto's child, whom 
he_keeps secluded agaihst harm. Gilda, his daughter, turns 
out to be the fair unjenown whom the Duke has admired 
at church. 

Act II, scene I, shows Rigoletto's home, where Gilda 
lives watched over wiih care by a duenna, Giovanna. The 



Duke appears, havin 
the love scene which 



discovered Gilda's home, and after 
ensues he leaves, hoping to return 
to her later. Ceprano ind the courtiers then arrive, having 
determined to avenje themselves upon Rigoletto by 



abducting the one whom they believe to be his sweetheart. 
Rigoletto comes to visit his daughter, and after leaving 
her is induced into unconsciously aiding the conspirators 
to abduct Gilda. As the scene ends, Rigoletto rushes into 
his house to find his daughter gone, and falls to the 
ground crying, "Ah, the malediction!" 

Scene II of Act II portrays a hall in the Duke's 
palace. The Duke, having returned to Gilda's home, has 
found that she has gone, but his melancholy at the 
thought of losing her is turned to joy when the courtiers 
come in and announce to him that they have captured 
"Rigoletto's sweetheart." He hastens to Gilda just as 
Rigoletto enters, pitifully attempting to hide his sorrow 
and distress. He pleads with the courtiers, whom in the 
past he has snubbed and angered, to help him, and at last 
breaking down he tells them that the girl is his daughter. 
He attempts to force an entrance into the Duke's apart- 
ments, but is barred by the courtiers. His abjectness and 
pleas for pity turn to hate as the courtiers make no effort 
to hide their feelings of satisfaction at having at last 
wreaked vengeance upon the hated jester. Into their 
midst enters Gilda, and the courtiers leave Rigoletto and 
his daughter together. She tells him of the lover who 
followed her from church, while Rigoletto, doing his best 
to comfort her, ponders how to obtain revenge. At that 
moment Monterone passes through the hall in charge of 
guards on his way to his execution, and as he nears the 
place where Rigoletto is standing, he again feels the power 
of his malediction. 

Act III is on the banks of the river at a ruined inn, 
the haunt of Sparafucile, a professional assassin. It is 
an old inn, so ruined that one can see the broken stair- 
case which leads to the loft from the ground floor. As 
the scene opens, Sparafucile is indoors seated by the 
table polishing his belt and sword. Rigoletto and his 
daughter, she not knowing the reason of her father's 
visit, approach, Gilda being dressed as a young man, her 
father hopeful that he can get her away from the city 
in disguise without further harm. Rigoletto has Drought 
Gilda to this spot hoping to break her attachment for 
the Duke by having her witness his infidelity. The Duke 
arrives while they are in hiding outside the inn, and makes 
love to Maddalena, Sparafucile's sister. After the Duke 
has retired to the loft to rest, Rigoletto, after sending 
his daughter away, engages Sparafucile to kill the Duke, 
and pays him one-half the fee, the other half to be paid 
when the body is delivered to him. Gilda, however, has 
overheard the plot and determines to save the Duke. 
After Rigoletto departs, Sparafucile prepares to do the 
deed. Maddalena begs him to spare the Duke, and after 
entreating him he agrees to kill the first person who shall 
knock at the garden gate. Gilda, who has overheard this, 
bravely offers herself to her father's vengeance by seek- 
ing admittance. Rigoletto returns and is given the sack 
in which he believes will be found the body of the Duke, 
the hated seducer of his daughter. Just as he is about 
to open the sack to gloat over his vengeance, the Duke 
is heard singing as he leaves the inn, and Rigoletto, 
realizing upon viewing his daughter's body, that the 
malediction has struck thrice in the same place, swoons 
upon her lifeless form as the opera ends. 

"Rigoletto" is one of the most popular and best known 
Italian operas and abounds in beautiful and popular 
arias. Thus in the first act, the Duke's "Ouesta o quella," 
Rigoletto's flippant aria "Ch'io le parli" during the scene 
with Monterone; in the second act Gilda's famous 
coloratura aria "Caro Nome" and the whispering chorus 
"Zitti, Zitti," as well as Rigoletto's two great arias in 
the second scene of the same act, "Povero Rigoletto" 
and "Piangi fanciulla," are some of the most popular 
music heard today. The "Caro Nome" of the second 
act, together with the Duke's "La donna e mobile" and 
the famous quartet "Bella figlia dell'amore" contain 
some of the greatest melodies and finest orchestration 
written by any modern operatic composer. 



E AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 4, 1932, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director and General Manager 

LES PECHEURS DE PERLES 

Opera in Three Acts 

Text by MICHEL CARRE and P. E. PIESTRE 0'Cormon ,, ) 

(IN FRENCH) 

MUSIC by GEORGES BIZET 

LEILA, a young Brahman priestess JOSEPHINE LUCCHESE 

ZURGA, chief of the pearl fishers JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

NADIR, a Singhalese friend of Zurga NINO MARTINI 

NOURABAD, a Brahman high priest IVAN STESCHENKO 

Incidental Dances by Dorothy Littlefield and Corps de Ballet 
The scene is laid in Ceylon, in barbaric times 

Conductor Sylvan Levin 

Stage Director Wilhelm von Wymetal, Jr. 

Synopsis of Scenes 

ACT I. A village on the seashore 
ACT II. The ruins of a temple 
ACT III. Scene 1 — The Camp of Zurga 
Scene 2 — A forest 



NO ENCORES ALLOWED 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL. Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian ANDREW LUCK 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn y Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 33 35 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 



X I AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Philip L. Leidy 



Les Pecheurs de Perles 

(The Pearl Fishers) 



Alexandre Cesar Leopold Bizet, or Georges Bizet as he 
was popularly known, was one of the most distinguished 
modern French composers. Born in Paris in 1838, he 
early showed great musical talent, and from 1848 to 18S7 
was a highly successful pupil of the Conservatoire. There 
he studied the piano, the organ, and harmony, with dis- 
tinguished masters, and his course in composition was 
under Halevy, composer of the opera "La Juive.". In 
1858, when barely nineteen, he produced his first opera, 
"Docteur Miracle," and from that time until his great 
opera, "Les Pecheurs de Perles," was performed in 1863, 
he wrote several operas and symphonic compositions. 

"Les Pecheurs de Perles" (or "The Pearl Fishers") 
really marks the beginning of Bizet's popularity, his other 
great works, "Carmen" and the "L'Arlesienne" suite, 
the latter written as incidental music to Daudet's play 
of the same name, having been written thereafter. 

The opera, "Les Pecheurs de Perles," is written in 
three acts and four scenes, the text being by Carre and 
Cormon. It was first produced at the Theatre Lyrique, 
Paris, September 29, 1863, and from that time on has 
been performed in most of the great musical centres. 
The scene of the ope; - a is in Ceylon, India, during the 
barbaric period. 

The first act is laid in a village of fishermen on the 
Ceylon seashore. The time has come for the fishermen 
to select a new chieftain, and they are gathered together 
for a ceremonial dance before their ancient temple. Zurga 
is unanimously chosen as chief; and scarcely has he been 
inducted into that office when a long lost friend, Nadir, 
appears. They talk over old times and speak of the days 
when they were both iij love and quarreled over the affec- 
tions of Leila, a beautiful priestess of the Temple of 
Brahma. At this point occurs one of the finest bits of 
melody which Bizet's inspired genius wrote into the 
opera. It is the duet between the two reunited friends, 
and is known as "An fond du temple saint" (In the 
Depths of the Temple). Believing themselves cured of 
their infatuation for their former love, the two men 
swear eternal friendship. 

At that moment a fisherman announces the arrival of a 
vessel bringing a mysterious veiled priestess, whose custom 
it is to come to the village once a year to pray for the suc- 
cess of the fishermen. • She is looked upon by the fisher- 
men as their guardian, and while she is at her devotions 
upon the rocks above the village none dares approach the 
place. The priestess enters, veiled, and before going into 
the temple, Zurga, as Chieftain, adjures her to keep her 
oath of chastity and she will receive upon leaving a pearl 
of great value. If she breaks her oath, however, death 
will be her portion. She is about to swear, when with a 
start she observes Nadir. The High Priest, Nourabad, 
reminds her that she may revoke her vows if she so 
desires, but she refuses, and enters the temple. Nadir, 
left alone, realizes that the veiled priestess is none other 
than Leila, whom he still loves, and he sings the beautiful 
aria "Je crois encore entendre" (I Hear as in a Dream). 
Nadir decides that he must tell Zurga of his discovery. 
He is weary, however, from his long journey and throws 
himself to the ground, falling asleep, while the priests 
build a fire on the rocks, where Leila sings a song of 
prayer to Brahma. Xalir, awakening, under cover of the 
darkness hastens to heH side. 



Act II is laid in the ruins of the Temple of Brahma. 
Leila has begun her lonely watch, Nourabad, the High 
Priest, warning her prior thereto of her oath to remain 
chaste. Here occurs one of the great coloratura arias, in 
which Leila tells Nourabad of the vows she made as a 
child, "En face de la mort j'ai su rester fidele." Noura- 
bad leaves, ami Leila is left thinking of Nadir, whom she 
is conscious of loving, and she bemoans her fate. At 
this point Nadir's voice is heard singing the aria "De 
mon amie" (My Love). He rushes to her and implores 
her to defy the priests and her oath and fly with him. 
She refuses, but her love is too strong and she soon finds 
herself in his arms. 

At that moment the High Priest, who has been watch- 
ing, alarms the people, telling them Leila has proven faith- 
less. The fishermen rush in with their drawn knives, 
demanding death as the punishment. Zurga orders the 
crowd to be gone, but as they go the High Priest tears 
the veil from the girl's face and Zurga, realizing that 
she is none other than Leila, the woman Nadir and he 
had sworn to forget forever, becomes enraged. He orders 
them both put to death, and as Nadir is taken away in 
chains, the priests lead Leila off as well. 

Act III, Scene 1, is in the tent of Zurga. He is brood- 
ing over the impending death of the woman he loves, and 
of his friend. Leila appears before him and begs for 
mercy for Nadir in the great aria known as "Pour moi 
je ne crains rien" (For Myself I Fear Not). Zurga is 
unrelenting, as he declares his love for her and his 
jealousy of Nadir, but is scorned by the girl, who is too 
proud to sue for her own life. Nourabad, the High Priest, 
enters to announce the forthcoming sacrifice. Leila gives 
him a chain, asking him to deliver it to her mother, and 
Zurga recognizes it as a necklace he had given many years 
before to a child (Leila) when she refused to deliver him 
up to his enemies. Zurga angrily tears the chain from 
the Priest's hand, and rushes out of the tent. 

The final scene of this act is in the wild part of the 
forest. A funeral pyre has been set up, and to it are 
brought Leila and Nadir. As they mount the pyre, a red 
glow is seen in the sky, which the people believe to be the 
dawn. Zurga, however, rushes in and tells them that 
the village is on fire, and all the fishermen run to save 
their children and their belongings. Meanwhile, the two 
prisoners and Zurga remain, watched by Nourabad, who 
is in hiding. He hears Zurga tell them that he has 
kindled the fire in order to save them both. He liberates 
them from where they are chained, and they speak their 
gratitude in a beautiful trio, "O lumiere sainte" (O Sacred 
Light. The lovers praise Zurga's generosity, who for the 
sake of friendship has done that which may cost him his 
life. As they escape, Nourabad, who has gone after the 
fishermen, enters and they seize Zurga. One of the fishers 
stabs Zurga as the people sing a chant to their god Brahma 
anil the vengeance which he has visited upon a traitor. 

liizet's music abounds in pure lyric melodies. He was 
the musician "par excellence." He had a vivid musical 
imagination, a tremendous sense of rhythm, and delighted 
in all things exotic. His music paints the locale of his 
operas in blazing and barbaric colors, and his plots and 
characters are gathered from the four corners of the earth. 
Thus we find "Les Pecheurs de Perles," a child of the 
Orient: "La jolie Fille de Perth," of Scotland; "Djamileh," 
of Egypt; and "Carmen," a daughter of Spain. 

In Bizet the lyric opera rises to great heights. To 
what dramatic heights this young Frenchman might have 
risen, had he lived, can well be imagined, but in 1875, 
at the musically tender age of thirty-seven, he died 
suddenly just after the first production of "Carmen," 
the masterpiece of his career. 



8 AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1931-1932 
THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 18, 1932, AT 7.45 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director and General Manager 

LOHENGRIN 

OPERA IN THREE ACTS 

(In German) 
Text and Music by RICHARD WAGNER 

KING HENRY IVAN STESCHENKO 

LOHENGRIN PAOLO MARION 

ELSA OF BRABANT ANNE ROSELLE 

ORTRUD CYREN A VAN GORDON 

TELRAMUND CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

THE KING'S HERALD NELSON EDDY 

(CAROL DEIS 
) AGNES DAVIS 
' )VIRGINIA KENDRICK 
RUTH CARHART 
(DANIEL HEALY 
) ALBERT MAHLER 

JCONRAD THIBAULT 

(jOHN COSBY 

GOTTFRIED. Ehw's Brother BERNICE DOLLARTON 

TIME: First half of the Tenth Century PLACE: Antwerp. 

CONDUCTOR FRITZ REINER 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I. Banks of the River Scheldt, near Antwerp. 
ACT II. Courtyard of the Palace. 
ACT III. Scene 1— Elsa's Bridal Chamber. 
Scene 2 — Same as Act I. 



NO ENCORES ALLOWED 



Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOW8KI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGI NE GOOSSENS 

Sta E e Director WILHELM von WYMETAL. Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDF O ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian ANDREW LUCK 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 



Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn & Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — fieppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Cheatnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3 33 5 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Philip L. Leidy 



Lohengrin 

By Richard Wagner 



"Lohengrin," by Richard Wagner, was the fifth opera 
to be produced by the German master, although in point 
of fact it was the fourth one which he started, "Tann- 
hjauser," however, having been produced before "Lohen- 
grin." The reason for this was Wagner's curious manner 
of dovetailing one opera into another before completing 
the one first started. Thus "Lohengrin," after being 
partly completed, was superseded by "Tannhauser," which 
he produced in 1849, and "Lohengrin" was not completed 
until after this production. It was first given at Weimar 
on August 28, 1850, when the conductor was the famous 
pianist and composer, Franz Liszt. Liszt's respect for 
the work was profound, and he spent a considerable period 
of time preparing this opera for production before it was 
actually given. As in many of his operas, Wagner called 
upon his love for mediaeval legend and romance with the 
cycle of the Grail and the Knights of the Round Table. 
This legend appears in various forms in northern and 
southern France and among many Celtic, British and 
Iberian peoples, and is the basis for the German poem of 
the thirteenth century entitled "Lohengrin," ascribed by 
various writers to Wolfram von Eschenbach. 

From these various sources he pieced together his ver- 
sion of the story of the Knight of the Holy Grail, sent by 
God to succor the Princess of Brabant in her distress. 
According to Wagner's version, Lohengrin is the son of 
Parsifal, the priest king of the Knights of the Holy Grail. 
Following the mediaeval German poem, Wagner fixed the 
period of the story in the reign of the Saxon king, Henry 
1, who in the tenth century saved the empire from devas- 
tation by the Huns. The various other characters in the 
opera are likewise of legendary origin. 

The opera is given in three acts and four scenes. Tlu- 
first act is on the banks of the River Scheldt, near Ant- 
werp. Seated on thi:s throne, King Henry of Germany, 
who has come to gather an army to resist the invasion 
of the Huns, finds the people of Brabant torn by dissen- 
sion. This we learn is due to the fact that the young 
Prince Godfrey of Brabant, who with his sister, Elsa, 
lived under the charge of Telramund and his wife, Ortrud, 
has disappeared. Telramund, however, accuses Elsa of 
having killed her brother, hoping to succeed to her and 
her brother's estates. He has been led to believe this by 
his wife, Ortrud, who practices the black art of magic, 
and it is she in fact who has caused the disappearance of 
the young prince. Telramund is a knight of great courage, 
who has in fact saved the King in a fight against the 
Danes, but the latter is loath to believe the monstrous 
charge against Elsa. He commands that she be brought 
before him. In her presence Telramund repeats his 
charge, and the King declares that justice must be done 
through the ancient ordeal of battle. Elsa is asked to 
name her champion, but cannot do so, and tells the as- 
sembled multitudes of a dream which she has had in 
which a knight in shining armor came to protect her. The 
King is greatly moved and orders the trumpeters to blow 
a summons to bring forth a champion on Elsa's behalf. 
As the third summons is given, a knight in shining armor, 
such as Elsa has described in her dream, appears in a 
boat drawn by a white swan. He tells them that he has 
come in response to Elsa's summons and asks her if she 
will accept him as her champion. She accepts, and he 
offers to fight for her. insisting however that on no account 
must she ask him his name, rank, or station in life, to 
which she agrees. The field of battle is measured off, 
and in the duel the tjnknown knight strikes Telramund to 
earth but mercifully spares his life. Elsa plights her 
troth to the stranger and the act ends as Ortrud plans 
revenge. 

Act II is in a court of the palace. The unknown knight 
is about to be marrind to Elsa, and on the steps of the 
chapel Telramund ami Ortrud lie outcast from the festivi- 
ties. Telramund is fingered at his wife, but she skilfully 



works upon his superstitious feelings. She tells him that 
the strange knight has won by magic, and that if he 
could be compelled to divulge his name and station in life 
his power would cease. Elsa alone can break the spell. 
At this point Elsa comes to the window, singing of the 
new joy in her life. Ortrud calls to her and feigns re- 
pentance, and at the same time plants in Elsa's heart the 
seeds of doubt as to Lohengrins identity. As day breaks, 
the knights and nobles cross the court, arrayed in splen- 
dor, preparatory to entering the church for the wedding. 
The wedding procession forms, and the nobles and the 
bride-to-be march down the steps of the palace and 
up to the chapel. Just as Elsa is about to enter, 
Ortrud_ springs before her, demanding priority over 
the bride-elect of a nameless knight. She raises such a 
commotion that soon the King and Elsa's champion appear. 
Telramund also demands the name of the unknown knight, 
claiming his mysterious arrival in the swan-drawn boat as 
an evidence of magic. But the King will not listen and 
the couple are ignominiously driven forth as the bridal 
procession enters the church. 

Scene 1 of Act III is in the bridal chamber of the palace. 
As the curtain rises, the strains of the wedding march are 
heard. The bridal procession enters, and then leaves the 
newly wed pair together. Elsa has nevertheless had her 
mind filled with questionings by the scene created by 
< irtrud and Telramund, and she grows more and more 
curious and insistent as to who her bridegroom is. The 
strange knight protests, and as the scene moves to a climax 
Telramund suddenly leaps into the chamber with drawn 
sword. Elsa hands her husband his own sword and with 
this weapon he strikes Telramund dead. The commotion 
has aroused others, who enter the chamber, and the victor 
commands that the dead body of Telramund be carried out 
to the Oak of Justice (the scene of the first act), as he 
may no longer keep his secret and his identity must be 
divulged. 

Scene 2 of Act III is similar to that of the first act. 
Much perturbed, the King awaits on his throne. Elsa 
enters with the unknown knight, who tells the King of 
Telramund's death and that Elsa has broken her promise. 
He then proclaims himself to be none other than Lohen- 
grin, the son of Parsifal of Monsalvat, a Knight of the 
Holy Grail. Elsa is broken-hearted, and as she laments 
of her overpowering curiosity, the swan is seen^ approach- 
ing, drawing the boat upon which Lohengrin arrived 
and upon which he must now depart. Lohengrin bids a 
tender farewell to his bride, telling her that if she had 
trusted him her missing brother would have been restored 
to her. He leaves behind his horn, his sword and his 
ring, to be given to the boy should he ever return. As 
the swan reaches the river bank, Lohengrin steps aboard 
the boat. At this moment Ortrud, who has mingled with 
the multitude, utters a cry of triumph, proclaiming that 
her magic after all is superior, and telling them all that 
the swan is the Prince of Brabant, the lost brother pi 
Elsa, who has by sorcery been transformed. Lohengrin, 
hearing Ortrud, kneels in the boat and prays to his 
Heavenly Father. As he does so, the white dove of the 
Holy Grail flutters down from above. Lohengrin, perceiv- 
ing it, rises and loosens the chain from the swan, which 
immediately sinks, and from the depths of the water 
Lohengrin then raises Godfrey, the Prince of Brabant, 
while the dove mysteriously draws the boat on its course. 
Elsa, realizing that she has lost Lohengrin forever, sinks 
lifeless to the ground. 

The score of Lohengrin abounds in lovely and unsur- 
passablv beautiful passages, among which the prelude to 
Act III and the Lohengrin "Wedding March" are known 
to all. Other great arias are "Elsa's Dream" and Lohen- 
grin's farewell to the swan in the first act, and the bridal 
chorus of Lohengrin's touching farewell to Elsa in the last 
act. 

Again in this opera Wagner has called upon his love 
of contrast between the mystical and the earthly, and 
"Lohengrin" may readily be called the real music drama 
of the ages, for it is here that Wagner demonstrates his 
technique for the first time in thoroughly developed and 
matured form. 



55 AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1931-1932 
THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 25, 1932, AT 8 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director and General Manager 



FAUST 



Lyric Drama in Four Acts 

Text by Jules Barbier and Michel Carre 

(In French) 

Music by CHARLES GOUNOD 

FAUST DIMITRI ONOFREI 

MEPHISTOPHELES IVAN STESCHENKO 

VALENTIN, Marguerite's brother CONRAD THIBAULT 

WAGNER, a student ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

SIEBEL, a youth IRRA PETINA 

MARGUERITE CHARLOTTE BOERNER 

MARTHE, Marguerite's companion EDWINA EUSTIS 

Walpurgis Night Dances, Act IV, Scene 2 

CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD, Premiere Danseuse 

Dorothy Littlefield, Dorothy Hubbard, Douglas Coudy and Corps de Ballet 

Time— XVI Century. Place— Germany. 

Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I— Scene 1 — The Laboratory of Dr. Faust. 

Scene 2 — The Village Fair. 
ACT II — Marguerite's Garden. 
ACT III— The Public Square. 
ACT IV— Scene 1— The Church. 

Scene 2 — Walpurgis Night Revels on the Brocken. 

Scene 3 — The Prison. 



NO ENCORES ALLOWED 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian ANDREW LUCK 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn & Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules— Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3335 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 



* 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Philip L. Leidy 



Faust 

By Charles Francois Gounod 

Charles Frangois Gounod was born in Paris, June 17, 
1818. His early musical education was under the tutelage 
of his mother, a distinguished pianist, and in 1836 he 
entered the Conservatoire, where he was a student of 
Halevy, along with Bizet. In 1837 he began to write 
and compose, and from that time until he wrote his first 
opera, "Sapho," in 1851, a great number of compositions 
from his pen became popular. His works during this 
time were mostly for chorus, orchestra and organ, and 
show a distinct flavor of Schumann's compositions. His 
next opera, "La Nonne Sanglante," in 1854, was never 
much of a success, and he began to write his opera 
"Faust" soon thereafter. In the midst of this latter com- 
position he turned, however, to a comic opera after 
Moliere's comedy, which he completed and produced in 
1858, known as "Le Medecin malgre lui." He finished 
"Faust" in 1859, ; nd this opera, together with his 
"Romeo et Juliette" in 1867 and "Mireille" in 1864, are 
his three outstanding successes, although he composed 
number-less other works. He died at Saint-Cloud, October 
18, 1893, after havinj; been accorded many honors by the 
French nation and the various musical conservatories. 

The opera "Faust" is based on Goethe's tragic poem, 
"Doctor Faustus." The poem covered so vast a scope, 
however, that it could not be condensed into a single 
opera, so that Gounod chose one single episode of the 
poem because of its dramatic possibilities. The opera is 
written in four acts and seven scenes, the last act includ- 
ing the scene of the Walpurgis Night revels on the 
Brocken. 

In the first scene of the first act Faust, an aged philos- 
opher, is found in his apartments mourning his lost youth. 
lie determines to end all, and is about to drink a goblet 
of poison when he heirs from without a song of a happy 
band of farm toilers going to their work. He hastens to 
the window, filled wiih envy and despair at the sight of 
human happiness, and curses the loss of his youth, at the 
same time calling upon the powers of Satan. At that 
moment Mephistopheles appears. He promises Faust youth 
in return for his sou. The philosopher hesitates, but is 
convinced when the demon shows him a vision of the 
beautiful Marguerite. He signs the parchment, promising 
his soul to Satan, drains the magic potion offered him, 
and goes off with his youth restored, arm in arm with 
Mephistopheles. 

Scene 2 of Act I is in the public square of a German 
town. A crowd of Lioldiers, students and peasants are 
gathered to celebrate. There occurs what is known as the 
"Kermesse Scene," with beautiful melodies combined into 
a six-part chorus. Among the soldiers is Valentin, the 
brother of Marguerite. He is about to go to war, and he 
and others are bidding the crowd good-bye. At that mo- 
ment Mephistopheles enters and amuses the crowd by tell- 
ing them various tales. Wine is brought, which Mephis- 
topheles tastes. He offers to give them better and striding 
over to the inn he strikes the sign over the door and 
magical wine gushes forth. All are startled, and Mephis- 
topheles mockingly insults Valentin by drinking a toast to 
Marguerite. Valentin immediately crosses swords with 
the demon, but it is broken in his hand by the sinister 
touch of Mephistopheles' sword. All the soldiers turn 
their swords with hilt uppermost, forming a cross, which 
causes the demon to cower and to shrink away. Margu- 



erite appears and meets Faust. Unconsciously she falls in 
love with him, and as the scene ends she prays to again 
see Faust. 

Act II is in Marguerite's garden. Her brother has gone 
to war, and Siebel, a young friend of his, is watching 
over Marguerite in his absence. While Siebel is away for 
a short time, Faust and Mephistopheles enter, and the lat- 
ter contrives to get her lady in waiting out of the way 
while Faust and Marguerite are together. The act closes 
as Marguerite, yielding to the entreaties of Faust, allows 
him to enter her home, as Mephistopheles mockingly 
laughs at the success of his plottings. 

Act III is in the public square. Faust has left Margu- 
erite and Valentin has returned from the war to find that 
his sister and her affair with Faust have become the talk 
of the village. Mephistopheles enters and sings his sar- 
donic serenade to Marguerite, hearing which Valentin 
rushes out of the house with drawn sword. He rushes at 
Mephistopheles and shatters with his sword the mandolin 
with which he has accompanied the song, and Valentin, 
not realizing that it is the satanic powers of Mephistopheles 
that he opposes, challenges Faust to a duel, during which 
his sword is broken by evil magic and he is mortally 
wounded. As he lies dying, Marguerite runs to him, but 
with his last breath he curses her as the cause of his 
death, and dies as the curtain falls. 

Scene 1 of Act IV is in the church. In this scene 
Marguerite is trying to pray for the absolution of her 
sins, but the voice of her conscience stifles her prayer. A 
vision of Mephistopheles appears in the chancel of the 
church, representing Marguerite's self-reproaches. The 
second scene is in the Brocken, whither Mephistopheles 
has taken Faust away from earthly things to give him a 
view of his satanic powers. A brilliant ballet occurs, at 
the end of which Faust, reclining among the courtesans, 
has a vision of Marguerite and rushes off, realizing that 
she is in dire peril. Scene 3 of the last act is in the 
prison. Marguerite has killed her child and is awaiting 
trial. Faust and his infernal master, defying bolts and 
bar, enter. Mephistopheles has warned Faust that if the 
girl is to be saved it must be done quickly, as the gallows 
awaits her. Faust has had a turn of heart and he calls 
upon Marguerite to flee with him. She responds in a 
semi-delirious manner, but refuses to return to earthly 
things with him. She prays to the Holy Angels, as Faust 
and Mephistopheles continue to urge her away with them, 
but she is now beyond earthly power. She gazes upwards, 
in ecstasy, as the heavens open and a company of angels 
gather her up to bear her away. Mephistopheles, with a 
curse, falls to the ground, his satanic power over Faust 
having been frustrated by the appearance of the heavenly 
hosts. 

"Faust" is the first in the cycle of sentimental operas. 
It abounds in melodies which have been popularized every- 
where. Some of the better known arias are Faust's song 
to his lost youth, "Je veux la jeunesse"; together with 
Valentin's "A toi, Seigneur et Roi des Cieux"; Mephistoph- 
eles' ballad to the calf of gold "Le Veau d'Or," a cyni- 
cal dissertation on man's worship of Mammon; Faust's 
exquisite romance, "Salut! demeure chaste et pure"; the 
famous "Jewel Song" of Marguerite, and the quartet in 
the second act. The well-known soldiers' chorus, "Gloire 
immortelle," and Mephistopheles' mocking serenade to 
Marguerite in the third act; the duet of Faust and Margu- 
erite; and her final aria "Anges purs! Anges radieux" 
in the last act, are also musical gems. 

Gounod has been well described as "the great love poet 
of the lyric stage in the nineteenth century." While he 
was not particularly profound in feeling, his music reveals 
all the dreamy ecstasy of a refined sensual passion. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1931-1932 
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 3, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director and General Manager 



ELEKTRA 



OPERA IN ONE ACT 

First Performance in Philadelphia in the Original German Text 
By Hugo von Hofmannsthal 

The Music by RICHARD STRAUSS 

CLYTEMNESTRA MARGARET MATZENAUER 

ELEKTRA ANNE ROSELLE 

CHRYSOTHEMIS CHARLOTTE BOERNER 

AEGISTHUS BRUNO KORELL 

ORESTES NELSON EDDY 

PRECEPTOR OF ORESTES WALTER VASSAR 

CONFIDANT OF CLYTEMNESTRA MARIE EDELLE 

TRAIN BEARER EDWINA EUSTIS 

YOUNG SERVANT DANIEL HEALY 

OLD SERVANT ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

MISTRESS OF MAIDS IRRA PETINA 

FIRST MAID ROSE BAMPTON 

SECOND MAID VIRGINIA KENDRICK 

THIRD MAID PACELI DIAMOND 

FOURTH MAID MARIE EDELLE 

FIFTH MAID HELEN JEPSON 

Six Maid Servants: Martha Everett, Charlotte Lockowitz, Mary Foster, 

Bertha Schlessinger, Irene Jacoby, Josephine Beale. 

The scene is laid in Mycenae, in Ancient Greece. 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, JR. 

NO ENCORES ALLOWED 

Director MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

Conductor LEOPO-D STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGZNE GOOSSENS 

Conductor ALBERTO BIMONI 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDIO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master IEANNE RENARD 

Librarian CHARLES DEMAREST 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

The Amplification System used is installed by courtesy of the Electrical Research Products, Inc., New York, under 

the supervision of Joseph Maxfield. 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn 6? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuctte" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 



X 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 



By Philip L. Leidy 



Elektra 

By Richard Strauss 



Richard Strauss, composer of the opera "Elektra," was 
born June 11, 1864, at Munich. His father was a musi- 
cian in the Court orchestra, and as a child Strauss started 
to play the piano at tihe age of four. At six he wrote his 
first composition, and from that time on his works, al- 
though begun on more classical lines, have revolutionized 
to a great degree the music of that period and can be con- 
sidered distinctly modernistic, although containing fine 
melodies of the nineteenth century. He learned to play 
the violin as well as the piano, which accounts to a degree 
for a number of concertos for strings which he wrote. 
Many of his earlier compositions show a distinct influence 
of Brahms, but as he grew older there was a gradual but 
marked tendency from the old classical lines to symphonic 
moods which might veil be termed "landscape painting in 
music." His earlier works did not enjoy the popularity 
which his later compositions have attained. The first two 
to receive world-wide recognition were the "Don Juan" 
tone poem for orchestra and his "Tod und VerHarung, to 
be followed at a subsequent date by "Till Euienspiegel" 
and "Ein Heldenleben." His first opera was "Guntram," 
which was written and produced in 1894. This opera in 
three acts was followed by "Feuersnot" in 1901; his 
famous "Salome" in 1905; and "Elektra" in 1909. In 
these three last operas Strauss turned to writings orches- 
tral in form, and the operas were written in one act each. 
Thereafter he reverted to the longer type of opera in 
"Der Rosenkavalier" in 1911 in three acts, but again re- 
turned to the shorter type opera in his "Ariadne auf 
Naxos," which is a :ondensed version of Moliere's "Le 
Bourgeois Gentilhomme." 

Strauss' "Elektra," produced first on January 25, 1909, 
at Dresden, had as librettist Hugo von Hofmannsthal, al- 
though a French version by Henri Gauthier-Villars has 
probably been given as often as the original. It is based 
on Sophocles' play of the same name. 

The scene of the opera, in one act, takes place in 
Mycenae, in ancient Greece. As the curtain rises the 
courtyard before the palace of King Agamemnon, leader 
of the Greek forces before Troy, is revealed. The forbid- 
ding and grim looking buildings bear out the tragic plot 
upon which the opera is based. Clytemnestra, wife of 
Agamemnon, has been unfaithful to him during his absence 
and has plotted and caused his murder, and married her 
paramour, Aegisthus. I By so doing she has incurred the 
hatred of her daughter, Elektra. For years Elektra has 
planned revenge upon her mother, and has resolved that 
the only way that the family honor can be avenged is by 
the murder of her mother and stepfather. As the scene 
opens, the servants are gossiping over the actions of the 
Queen's three children — Elektra and Chrysothemis, her 
daughters, and Oresteb, her son, who is off to war. They 
have noticed Elektra's brooding and her wild actions, and 
have overheard her concocting schemes to avenge her 
father's death. As Fiektra comes into the courtyard the 
servants are hurried of to their departure by the overseers 
and she, in despair, calls upon the memory of her father 



to help her, while she gloats over the thought that some- 
day he will be avenged and his murderers punished for 
their evil deed. Chrysothemis, Elektra's younger sister, is 
entirely unlike Elektra. She enters and tells Elektra that 
their mother and stepfather are plotting to cast her into 
prison. Elektra, half crazed with grief and wrath, begs her 
sister to aid her in wreaking revenge, but Chrysothemis 
desires no bloodshed and longs only for her future hap- 
piness. Elektra scornfully rebukes her sister and reiterates 
her vows of vengeance. 

At that moment the Queen, Clytemnestra, enters and 
relates to Elektra the horrrible dreams that she has been 
having and implores her daughter's help. She tells 
Elektra that she will do anything to appease the anger of 
the gods, and in terror she virtually confesses that she 
killed the king. Elektra adds to her mother's fears by 
telling her the punishments to be meted out by th; gods, 
of which she secretly hopes to be the medium. While 
Elektra, in a terrible rage, is berating her mother, a mes- 
senger arrives and tells the Queen that her plot to have 
her son Orestes killed has been successful. This imme- 
diately relieves the Queen's mind, for she had feared her 
son's anger upon his return from war. She immediately 
becomes happy and exultant over the news, and Elektra is 
unable to understand the sudden change in her mother's 
mood. As the Queen leaves, Chrysothemis enters and 
tells Elektra of the death of their brother Orestes. In 
fury, Elektra again pleads with her sister to help mete 
out punishment on the criminals who have been respon- 
sible for the death of their father and brother. Chryso- 
themis, however, again refuses and Elektra in a savage 
rage digs in the earth for the hatchet which she has buried 
in preparation for her revenge. In the midst of her fury, 
a stranger enters and finally reveals himself to her as none 
other than her brother, Orestes. He tells her he has 
caused the rumor of his death to be circulated in order 
to give the murderers of his father a sense of security, the 
better to be able to obtain revenge. Elektra tells Orestes 
that the Queen, their mother, has admitted to her having 
committed the crime, and Orestes in a blind rage rushes 
into the palace. Meanwhile Elektra dances wildly and 
exultantly, gloating over the thought that at last her 
beloved father is to be avenged, and as she does so shrieks 
of terror from within the palace denote that Clytemnestra 
has been killed by her own son for her misdeed. 

The servants hasten in, as does Aegisthus, who has 
also heard the Queen's screams. As he rushes toward the 
palace, Elektra greets him with mocking deference, ami 
just as he is about to enter the palace he is met at the 
door by Orestes, who stabs him. Elektra having attained 
the summit of her gruesome joy and revenge, and her rea- 
son having been overthrown by the succession of tragedies, 
dances furiously and triumphantly to exhaustion and death 
as the curtain falls. 

The tremendous orchestration required by Strauss' score 
necessitates the use of ninety-six members of the- orches- 
tra. The music is terrible in its realism, and while it has 
been termed "not music but dramatic noise," there art' 
many tremendous passages of great beauty, showing 
Strauss' advanced technique. Elektra's wild dance at the 
end of the opera is interpreted by music which is over- 
powering in its brutality, and the morbid spirit of the 
composition is expressed throughout in the music. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1931-1932 
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 10, 1932, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director and General Manager 

THE SECRET OF SUZANNE 

(In English) 

Comedy in One Act 

Music by ERMANNO WOLF-FERRARI 

Book by ENRICO GOLISCIANI (from the French) 

SUZANNE HELEN JEPSON 

GIL NELSON EDDY 

SANTE ERICH von WYMETAL 

CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

To be Followed by 



PAGLIACCI 



(In Italian) 

Opera in Two Acts with a Prologue 

Book and Music by RUGGIERO LEONCAVALLO 

NEDDA CHARLOTTE BOERNER 

CANIO AROLDO LINDI 

TONIO JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

BEPPE ALBERT MAHLER 

SILVIO CONRAD THIBAULT 

CONDUCTOR CESARE SODERO 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

NO ENCORES ALLOWED 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKO WSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDRE AS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian ANDREW LUCK 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINS LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn &? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3 335 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 



X AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC 



X 



STORY OF THE OPERA 

By Philip L. Leidy 



The Secret of Suzanne 

(II Segreto di Susanna) 
By Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari 

Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari was born in Venice, January 12, 
1876. He studied music and composition in Italy, but 
spent some time, as well, studying in Germany. He pro- 
duced a number of operas, beginning in 1889, and his 
"Secret of Suzanne" was produced in 1909. The com- 
poser himself termed it "an interlude in one act." The 
libretto was by Enrico Golisciani, from the French. The 
~cene is a drawing room in Piedmont. Italy, and the time 
1840. As a novelty which is sure to interest all opera- 
lovers, the characters are in modern dress and the opera 
will be sung in English. There are only three principals 
in the opera — Count Gil and his young wife, Countess 
Susanna, and Sante, a servant, whose part is purely 
pantomime. 

Count Gil is an autocratic young nobleman who, having 
no vices himself, forbids the practice of any in his home. 
He returns to his home unexpectedly and detects in the 
living room the unmistakable odor of tobacco. He himself 
does not smoke, so he determines to investigate the matter. 
lie questions Sante, who denies any part in the infraction 
of the household rules. The Countess Susanna, his wife, 
has followed her husband in, and manages to slip 
unnoticed into her room. As she comes out, Count Gil 
notices as well the odor of tobacco about her clothing, 
and becomes convinced that she is entertaining a lover, 
for suspicion concerning the smoking cannot be fastened 
on anyone else in tie household. Susanna, who enjoys 
smoking, and still more enjoys having a secret from her 
husband, fears that he has discovered her diversion. Gil 
makes attempts to control his jealousy until his suspicions 
are proven, but finally accuses Susanna of being unfaith- 
ful. She, misinterpreting his allusion and believing he 
refers to her smoking, begs him to be tolerant of her 
folly and not to wat:h her too closely, saying that other 
women do as she doe-S and asking to be allowed to keep 
her "little secret." Gil is furiously angry, thinking that 
her admissions are far more serious than they really are. 
and he rushes about in wrath demolishing everything on 
which he can lay his hands. 

Finally, Susanna having left the room and Sante having 
entered to restore order, Gil determines to trap her lover. 
He leaves on the pretext of going to his club, and while he 
is gone Susanna sits musing over her husband's bad temper 
and smoking a cigarette, Sante at the same time taking a 
pinch of snuff, and both laughing merrily over Gil's mis- 
take. A knock is hea _ d and there is a delay while Susanna 
hides her cigarette. It is Gil, who is returning expecting 
to catch Susanna and her lover. He is angered at the 
delay in opening the door and at the smoke which i^ in 
the room when he enters, and searches the room to find 
someone in hiding, but is, of course, unable to confirm his 
suspicion. 

As Gil goes away again, Susanna re-lights her cigarett . 
although very anxious over her husband's behavior. 
Shortly thereafter a tap is heard on the window, and (iil 
enters through it, thinking that this time he has caught 
her. He seizes her hand, and gets burned by the cigarette. 
Now realizing that his suspicions and jealousy are 
unfounded, he begs forgiveness, as does Susanna for hav- 
ing taken to smoking. Each forgives the other, and when 
Susanna promises never to smoke again, Gil says that 
they will both smoke together. Susanna gives him a 
cigarette and he lights it from hers. They are so con- 
tented and happy at having become reconciled that they 
neglect their cigarettes, which go out. Sante, entering 
with a candle and viewing the situation, goes up to them 
and grinning in amusement offers them a light from the 
candle as the curtain falls. 



Pagliacci 



By Ruggiero Leoncavallo 



Ruggiero Leoncavallo was born at Naples, March 8, 
1858. He early began musical studies for the piano and 
was later admitted to the Neapolitan Conservatoire, when 
at eighteen he received the diploma of Maestro. He at 
once set to work composing, and on May 21. 1892, his two- 
act opera, "Pagliacci," was produced in Milan. His name 
became famous throughout Italy after this success. 
Although it was written and submitted in competition with 
Mascagni's "Cavalleria Rusticana," it was disqualified 
from being considered because the contest was restricted 
to one-act operas. Nevertheless, it is usually given in 
conjunction with Mascagni's masterpiece and the majority 
of opera-goers when thinking of one naturally link the two 
together. 

The Pagliacci are a troupe of traveling comedians, which 
includes Tonio, the clown; Canio, the Pagliaccio; and 
Xedda, his wife, the Columbine. Leoncavallo adopted an 
old theatrical custom, dating back to the Greek drama, of 
having a prologue in which one of the characters steps 
before the curtain and reminds the audience that the 
players are of- like flesh and blood with themselves, sharing 
their pleasures and sorrows, their angers and jealousi s, 
and their love and laughter. 

The scene of the opera is at the entrance of a village 
at the meeting point of two roads. The time is the day of 
the Feast of the Assumption, and the village is holidayii g 
in festive attire. They welcome the troupe of players, 
headed by Canio, which comes down the road in a donkey- 
cart. With him is his wife, Nedda, and Canio wears 
the familiar Pierrot costume of Punchinello. The troupe 
sets up its belongings to give a performance that evening 
and after the crowd disperses it develops that Tonio, 
the clown, is in love with Nedda. She, however, loves 
Silvio, a young villager, who arrives and makes love to 
her. Tonio, overhearing them, is overcome by jealousy 
and fetches Canio, the husband, who arrives just in time 
to see the lover disappearing, without finding out who 
he is. Nedda refuses to tell his name, and Beppe, the 
Harlequin, barely saves her from her infuriated husband's 
d agger. 

The second act opens on the same scene. It is *'• 
evening of the same day and the little theatre and 5 
audience are shown, all expectant for the beginning of the 
play. The performance to be given is an episode very 
similar to the one which the principal actors are experienc 
ing. In the play, Harlequin is making love to Columbine 
(who is Nedda) while her husband, Pagliaccio, is av. .v. 
and Taddeo, the clown, is on the watch for his return. 
When the mimic husband returns (in the person of thr 
jealous husband, Canio), the play turns into real life. He 
insists upon learning from Nedda the name of her lover 
and, mad with jealousy, stabs her when she refuses to 
divulge it. As Silvio, who is one of the audience, rushes 
to her assistance, Canio also stabs him to death, and as he 
turns to the horrified audience the curtains fall_ with his 
bitter ironical declaration, "La comedia e finita!" 

The success of "Pagliacci" is due in a great measure 
Leoncavallo's choice of subject and the dramatic eff« 
tiveness of the plot. This is not meant to imply th 
there are not melodious moments in the opera. As a mat- 
ter of fact, some of the best known arias, sung the world 
over, are contained therein. Thus the famous Prologue, 
Nedda's beautiful ballad to the birds, and Canio's "Vest! 
la giubba," are typical of the composer's musical genius. 



Thursday evening, March 31, 1932 at 8.15 o'clock 
PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA 
COMPANY 
Mrs. William C Hammer, Director and General Manager 

Presents 

L'HEURE ESPAGNOLE 

(The Spanish Hour) 

(In English) 

Special English translation for which permission 
has been granted by Elkan-Vogel Company of 
Philadelphia, owners of the copyright in the 
United States. 

Music by MAURICE RAVEL 

Cast. 



Concepcion, Wife of Torquemada. . .••♦..Charlotte Boerner 

Gonzalve, a young Gallant. • .Ralph Errolle 

Torquemada, a Clock-maker. Albert Mahler 

Ramiro, a Muleteer. .Chief Caupolican 

Don Inigo Gomez, a Banker Abrasha Robofsky 

The scene is laid in a clock-maker's shop in 
Toledo, Spain, during the eighteenth century 



CONDUCTOR SYLVAN LEVIN 

STAGE DIRECTOR ERICH VON WYMETAL 



* — - » 



World Premiere of the Mexican Ballet-Symphony 

"H. P." 

By CARLOS CHAVEZ 

DECOR and COSTUMES by DIEGO RIVERA 

CONDUCTED by LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

CAST 

HP ALEXIS DOLINOFF 

SIREN DOROTHIE LITTLEFIELD 

KING BANANA DOUGLAS COUDY 

FIRST NATIVE THOMAS CANNON 

FLAPPER DOROTHIE LITTLEFIELD 

RED SNAPPER ROSALIE BETZ 

SWORD FISH PATSY TAULANE 

SUN FISH LORRAINE GAMSON 

CAPTAIN ERICH von WYMETAL 

FIRST MATE LOUIS PURDEY 

CABIN BOY KENNETH HOWARD 

VENTILATOR SOPHIE FADUM 

GAS PUMP DOROTHY JACKSON 

TOBACCO MARY WOODS 

SILVER ANNA McCUE 

GOLD MARTHA F1TZPATRICK 

COTTON STELLA CLAUSSEN 

SIRENS: Mmes. Hoffman, Cutler, Mountain, Jackson, Ionone, P. Gamson. COCOANUTS. 
Mmes. Becker, Bremer, Vosseler, Greene, Cohen, Smythe, Stuard. NATIVE WOMEN: 
Mmes. Rendelman, Dollarton, Karklinsh, King. Campbell, Geurard, Graham. NATIVE 
MEN: MM. Lowe, Popov, Taub. SAILORS: MM. Hamlin, Littlefield, Fischman, Colker, 
Vassar, Ramey, Levin, Holland, Hemmerley, Dravermann, Reiss, Irvine. WOMEN 
WORKERS: Mmes. Zane, Doughty, Taulane, Kauffman, Del Buno, McCue, Reihman, 
Deacon, Miller, Sayre, Walsh, Mert, Goldsmith, Shoenburg, Chambers, Vaughan, Thomas. 
MEN WORKERS: MM. Higgins, Gallagher, Konopka, McKleever, Berr.ert, Steubing, 
Saxon, Dougherty. NATIVE CHILDREN: Mmes. S. Rosenbaum, G. Rosenbaum. Smith, 
Benner, Vosseler, Conrad. PINEAPPLES: Mmes. Axford, Loeb, Flynn. 

CHOREOGRAPHY CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, JR. 

Scenery designed and executed by A. Jarin Scenic Studios 

Costumes made by Van Horn & Son 



Scene 1 — The Man 
Scene 2 — The Boat. 



SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

Scene 3 — Tropics. 

Scene 4 — City of Industry and Machinery. 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

As there will be no pauses in the music by the orchestra during changes of scene, it is 
earnestly requested that there be no applause during orchestral interludes. 

The Philadelphia Grand Opera Company desires to thank Mr. Stokowski, who has con- 
tributed his services as an expression of his admiration for Mexican culture. 



STORY OF THE OPERA AND BALLET 

By Philip L. Leidy 



L'Heure Espagnole 

By Maurice Ravel 

Maurice Ravel was born in France on March 7, 1875. 
He has passed most of his life in or about Paris, and his 
environment therefore does not account for his deep 
predilection for Spanish subjects, as represented by num- 
berless of his compositions. Ravel is known the world 
over today for the brilliancy of his command of orchestral 
timbres and musical picturing. 



"L'Heure Espagnole" was his first stage work. It was 
written in the year 1910 and was produced that same 
year at the Opera Comique in Paris. Since that time, 
this composition has been received with great enthusiasm 
by the musical public, the opera having been first per- 
formed in this country in 1920. 



his day for attending 
It is also the one day 
cion, can enjoy her 



her lover, Gonzalve. 
would like to have 



The opera, written in one act, depicts the shop of Tor- 
quemada, an absent-minded clock-maker of Toledo. It is 

to the winding of the public clocks. 

of the week when his wife, Concep- 

ove affairs with complete freedom.' 
As Torquemada leaves to attend to his duties, Ramiro, a 
muleteer, enters to have his watch repaired. This pro- 
vokes Concepcion, particularly as her husband invites the 
muleteer to await his return. She schemes as to what 
to do with the unwelcome customer, as she is expecting 
She suggests to Ramiro that she 

one of the ponderous grandfather 
clicks carried to her room, as Torquemada has claimed 
that it is too heavy for him to lift. While Ramiro with 
great ease takes the clock to her chamber, Gonzalve 
appears. During the muleteer's absence, Concepcion hides 
Gonzalve in another clock. As Ramiro returns, Concep- 
cion tells him that she has changed her mind and that 
she wishes the other clock (containing Gonzalve) moved 
to her chamber. The unsuspecting Ramiro carries to her 
chamber the clock in which Gonzalve is hiding, and is to 
return with the first clock. Don Inigo, a banker, and 
secretly in love with Concepcion, enters the shop. He 
too is hidden in a clock, and as the muleteer returns, 
I oncepcion again arranges another switching of the time- 
pieces. Meanwhile, however, Concepcion has become 
tired of Gonzalve's exaggerated and poetic love-making, 
and also of Don Inigo's admiration for her. She has 
been won over by Ramiro's prowess and strength, and she 
transfers her flirtation to him. While they are both in' 
her chamber, Torquemada returns. He finds the two 
dejected lovers in his clocks, and in order to avoid 
suspicion they are obliged to purchase them of him. 
Concepcion and Ramiro return, as the opera ends in a 
sparkling quintet. 



"H. P." 

By Carlos Chavez and Diego Rivera 

The ballet "H. P." symbolizes the relations of the 
Northern Regions with those of the Tropics, and shows 
their inter-relationship. The Tropics produce things in 
their primitive state — there are Pineapples, Cocoanuts, 
Bananas, and Fish. The North produces the Machinery 
with which to manufacture from the products of the 
Tropics the necessary material things of life. The Ballet 
depicts the fact that the North needs the Tropics, just 
as the Tropics need the machinery of the North, and 
attempts to harmonize the result. 

SYNOPSIS 

1. Dance of the Man, H.P.: 

The man, and his mechanical counterpart H.P., repre- 
sent the age of machinery. His dance, in rhythmic form, 
expresses the force of the machinery age which has super- 
seded manual labor of past decades. 

2. A Cargo Ship at Sea, symbolizing the commerce 
between the North and the South: 

A gymnastic dance of sailors denotes the vigor, activity 
and physical force of man untrammeled by machinery. 
As the ship gets farther towards the South, the regulated 
and well-ordered life of the sailors becomes affected by 
the warmth and languor of the Tropics. Mermaids of 
the tropical seas, interpreting this phase of their trip, 
come over the side of the ship followed by their train of 
fish, and express in a dance, all the nonchalance, sensu- 
ality and seduction usually associated with the warmer 
climates. Finally all are swept by the intoxication of the 
moment and of the dance. 

3. A Ship in the Tropics: 

The cargo ship is at dock. The natives are selling their 
wares and whiling away their time in dance. On the one 
side are the cocoanut trees and on the other the sugar 
canes. They are swaying in the slight tropical breeze. 
The natives dance their "Zandunga," and all of the trees 
join in the swaying and rhythm of the music. Other 
fruits, represented by the "King Banana" and pineapples, 
enter and join in the dance, at the close of which, all 
move towards the ship as the sailors start loading their 
cargo of fruit for their trip to the North. 

4. The City of Industry: 

The scene depicts the North, with its skyscrapers, ma- 
chinery, and mechanical activities. The workers of the 
world are at their toil, further expressing the Machinery 
Age by a mechanical and regulated dance. They are 
sullen and unruly, however, as H.P. urges them on to 
further efforts. An American Flapper, depicting by her 
dance the Age of the Automobile, exerts for the moment 
a restraining influence over them. Finally they revolt 
against the despotism of Machinery, as Capitalism, repre- 
sented by a large stock ticker, becomes panic-stricken. 
The workers revolt and open a Safe, representing the 
wealth of the world, out of which come finally all the 
Natural Resources of the earth — gold, silver, cotton, iron, 
etc., and the fruit and produce of the soil. The workers 
resume their toil as the sun sets on a resumption of the 
more normal activities of Man and a return to simpler 
methods of labor and living. 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC x 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1931-1932 
THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 7, 1932, AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director and General Manager 



CARMEN 



Opera in Four Acts 

Text by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halevy, adapted from the novel by Prosper Merimee 

(In French) 

Music by GEORGES BIZET 

CARMEN, a Gypsy Cigarette Girl COE GLADE 

(Courtesy of Chicago Civic i 'pera Company) 

DON JOSE, a Corporal of Dragoons AROLDO LINDI 

ESCAMILLO, a Toreador CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

DANCAIRE ) ( ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 

REMENDADO / Smu ^ lers j ALBERT MAHLER 

ZUNIGA, a Captain of Dragons IVAN STESCHENKO 

MORALES, a Dragoon CONRAD THIBAULT 

MICAELA, a Peasant Girl NATALIE BODANSKAYA 

FRASQUITA ) f „ I HELEN JEPSON 

MERCEDES f G yP sies > Friends of Carmen < ROSE BAMPTON 

The scene is in and near Seville, Spain, in 1820 

Corps de Ballet of 100 members with CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD. Premiere Danseuse 

Dorothy Littlefield, Douglas Coudy and Thomas Cannon 

CONDUCTOR FRITZ REINER 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 
ACT I. — Public Square in Seville 
ACT II.— The Inn of Lillas Pastia 
ACT III. — A Mountain Pass 
ACT IV.— Before the Bull Ring in Seville 



NO ENCORES ALLOWED 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor ™TZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Ass.stant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Staee Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage "Manager' '.'.'.' ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian ANDREW LUCK 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn &? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company, 3335 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 



X 



AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 
| STORY QF THE OPERA 

By Ikilip L. Leidy 



"CARMEN" 

By Georges Bizet 

Georges Bizet, one of the most distinguished modern 
French composers, was born in Paris in 1838. He liowed 
early in his life great musical talent and studied both 
the piano and the or Jin with distinguished masters. He- 
wrote a number of operas and musical suites, his supreme 
creation being "Carmen," which was produced first in 
Paris in 1875, the same year in which the composer died 
at the early age of thirty-seven. 

"Carmen" is among the three or four most popular 
operas of all time. Written in four acts, it is based on 
Prosper Merimee's novel of the same name, adapted by 
in libretti form. The action takes 
n, in 1820. 

a public square in Seville before a 
is the noon hour and the cigarette 
little knots chatting gaily with the 
men. Carmen, one of the cigarette girls, is surrounded 
by numerous admirer;, whom she, however, spurns and 
flirts with Don Jose, ^n officer of the guard. He is indif- 
and she is piqued. The cigarette 
ivork, but shortly thereafter a com 
the factory, just as Don Jose is 
reading a letter froth his mother brought him by his 



Meilhac and Halevy 
place in Seville, Spa 
The first act is in 
cigarette factory. It 
girls are gathered in 



ferent to her charms 
girls return to their 
motion breaks out in 



sweetheart, Micaela. 
girl and stabbed her 



her hands are tied 1 
charge of Don Jose 



Carmen has quarreled with another 
She is brought before the officer 



of the guard and arrested. She behaves with insolence; 



! ehind her back and she is left in 
ivho is to take her to prison. She 
at once exerts all h< r powers of fascination upon Don 
Jose, who finally becomes infatuated with her, unbinds 
soldiers come to take her away she 
escapes, while Don Jose remains to suffer the consequences. 
Act II is in a tavern in the suburbs of Seville. Carmen, 
who has sought refu ;e here, is in her element. Gypsy 
smugglers have come down from the mountains and are 
having a gay time c ancing and feasting. Here, as in 
the fourth act, occur; one of the loveliest ballets written 
in French opera. The smugglers are preparing to depart 
and invite Carmen to" join them. She, however, still 
fascinated by Don Jose, awaits his release from prison. 
Meanwhile Escamillo, the toreador, appears singing his 
famous "Toreador Song." Carmen is still loyal to Don 
Jose, but rather upse^ by the good looks of the toreador. 
As he is about to leave, Don Jose enters, having been 
released from his incarceration for having aided Carmen 
in escaping. She nances for him, and he is more en- 
slaved than ever. As the bugles sound for his return to 
the barracks, Carmen begs him to join the smugglers. 
Zuniga, captain of the guard, enters and orders Don Jose 
to be off, hoping to gain Carmen's favors. Don Jose 
refuses, and Zuniga strikes him, and Don Jose, angered, 
his sabre and attempts to attack his superior 



draws 
officer. 



and he is forced to 
is forever doomed as 



The smugglers intervene and overpower Zuniga 



leave. Don Jose, realizing that he 
a soldier, determines to desert and 
become a smuggler, Jwhere he will have the companion- 
ship of Carmen. 

Act III is in a wild and rocky pass in the mountains, 



at night. Don Jose is still passionately in love with 
Carmen and has forgotten Micaela and his mother. Hav- 
ing deserted, he is an outcast with a price upon his head. 
It is the hour before dawn. The smugglers arrive in 
groups, set down their bundles, and light a fire. Here 
occurs the famous Sextette, during which Carmen reads 
her fortune in the cards. The death card repeatedly 
appears and she is overcome by superstition and fear of 
death. As they all retire to the upper passes, Micaela 
enters with a letter from Don Jose's mother; she is dying 
and Micaela has brought the news to her son. As 
Micaela sings her beautiful aria, "Je dis que rien ne 
me'epouvante," a shot is fired. Don Jose, who has been 
on guard, has seen a stranger and fired at him. Micaela 
rushes into the cave. The stranger is none other than 
Escamillo, who has come to join Carmen. He introduces 
himself to Don Jose and they learn that they are rivals. 
In a moment their knives are out and they are about to 
battle to death for Carmen's favor. The smugglers again 
interfere and prevent bloodshed, as Micaela reappears 
with the news of the illness of Don Jose's mother. She 
begs him to see his mother before her death. Carmen 
scornfully echoes Micaela's request, as he is turn between 
jealousy and desire to see his mother. Finally he leaves 
with Micaela, threatening to return again and claim 
Carmen, uttering dire intentions if she is unfaithful to 
him. As the act closes, Carmen shudderingly remembers 
the message of the cards. 

Act IV depicts a square in Seville before the entrance 
of the bull ring. A brilliantly dressed throng awaits the 
procession preceding the appearance of Escamillo, the 
famous toreador. The procession winds its way into the 
bull ring as Escamillo appears with Carmen, magnificently 
dressed. Her brilliant attire proclaims its own story. 
Escamillo promises to fight all the better for Carmen's 
love, and enters the bull ring. At that moment Carmen 
is warned that Don Jose has returned and is seeking her. 
She, however, is defiant and replies that she does not 
fear him, and awaits his appearance. Don Jose enters 
and pleads for her love, and for a moment Carmen seems 
to waver. Just then from the interior of the ring there 
come the plaudits of the crowd, and Carmen knows that 
the end has come. Don Jose's rage increases as the 
applause of the multitude grows lounder. Carmen, again 
defiant, throws Don Jose's ring at his feet and attempts 
to rush into the bull ring. Seeing the object of his desires 
about to leave him, Don Jose stabs her to death. At that 
moment Escamillo appears triumphant with the crowd, 
and as the curtain falls Don Jose, freeing himself from 
the crowd, flings himself across Carmen's body, crying 
out "My adored Carmen!" 

Any one who hears a performance of "Carmen" with- 
out leaving with a tune on his lips can lay the blame 
only to embarrassment of riches. The whole work teems 
with melodies and rhythm and glows with harmonic and 
orchestral color. Some of the better known and superb 
arias are Don Jose's "Parle-moi de ma mere" and Car- 
men's "L'amour est enfant de Boheme" in the first act; 
Don Jose's Flower Song in the second; the famous Sex- 
tette and the well-known "Toreador Song" in the third 
act; and Escamillo's aria "Si tu m'aimes," the final duet 
of Carmen and Don Jose, "('est Toi," and "Je t'aime 
encore" in the final scene. 



H AMERICAN ACADEMY of MUSIC X 



GRAND OPERA — SEASON 1931-1932 
Thursday Evening, April 14, 1932, at 8.15 o'Clock 

PHILADELPHIA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER, Director and General Manager 



AIDA 



OPERA IN FOUR ACTS 

Text by Antonio Ghislanzoni 
(In Italian) 

MUSIC BY GIUSEPPE VERDI 

AIDA ANNE ROSELLE 

AMNERIS CYRENA VAN GORDON 

RADAMES AROLDO LINDI 

AMONASRO . CHIEF CAUPOLICAN 

THE KING LEO DE HIERAPOLIS 

RAMFIS IVAN STESCHENKO 

A MESSENGER FIORENZO TASSO 

A PRIESTESS , NATALIE BODANSKAYA 

Dances by CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD, Premiere Danseuse 
Dorothie Littlefield, Douglas Coudy, Thomas Cannon and Corps de Ballet 

CONDUCTOR FRITZ REINER 

STAGE DIRECTOR WILHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

ACT I. Scene 1— A Hall in the Palace of Pharaoh. 
Scene 2 — The Temple of F'tah. 

ACT II. Scene 1 — Amneris' Room in the Palace. 
Scene 2 — The Gates of Thebes. 

ACT III. The Temple of Isis on the River Nile. 

ACT IV. Scene 1— A Hall in the Palace of Pharaoh. 

Scene 2 — The Temple of Ptah and Crypt Beneath. 

NO ENCORES ALLOWED 

Conductor LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 

Conductor FRITZ REINER 

Conductor EUGENE GOOSSENS 

Stage Director . WILHELM von WYMETAL, Jr. 

Assistant Conductor SYLVAN LEVIN 

Chorus Master ANDREAS FUGMANN 

Stage Manager ERICH von WYMETAL 

Assistant Stage Manager ALESSANDRO ANGELUCCI 

Assistant to Chorus Master JEANNE RENARD 

Librarian ANDREW LUCK 

Ballet Mistress CAROLINE LITTLEFIELD 

Premiere Danseuse CATHERINE LITTLEFIELD 

Orchestra Manager ALEXANDER HILSBERG 

Scenery by A. Jarin Scenic Studios, Philadelphia. 

Costumes by Van Horn 6? Son, Philadelphia. 

The Piano used is the Edouard Jules — Heppe Piano Company, sole American Agents, 1300-06 N. 6th Street, and 

1710 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

The Pipe Organ used is the Estey "Minuette" — Estey Organ Studios, 1706 Rittenhouse Street, Philadelphia. 

Oriental Rugs by John Temoyan Company. 333? Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Association 

MRS. JOSEPH LEIDY 
President 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

SAMUEL H. BARKER 

MRS. WILLIAM C. HAMMER 

JACOB SINGER 

MRS. WILLIAM B. WHELEN, Secretary 



JOHN GRIBBElL 
C. IIARTMAN KUHN 
DR. JOSEPH LEIDY 
HARLEY T. McDERMOTT 



GROUP AND BOX COMMITTEES 

MRS. MARGARET WYNNE PARIS, Chairman 
TRAM LIPPINCOTT MRS. R. TAIT McKENZIE 

L. HUTCHINSON, Jr. 
G. FLAGG, Jr. 



MRS. J. 

MRS. DANIEL 

MRS. STANLEY 

JOHN C. BELI[ 

MRS. GEORGE DALLAS DIXON 



FRANCIS RAWLE, Jr. 

MRS. ISAAC W. JEANES 

MRS. EDWARD DIGBY BALTZELL 

MRS. GEORGE WILLING 



RECEPTION COMMITTEE 

MRS. EDWARD OSBORNE TROTH, Chairman 
Y MORGAN TAYLOR, Treasurer MISS ANNA B. WETHERILL, Secretary 



CHESTjNUT HILL COMMITTEE 

MRS. RANDAL MORGAN, Chairman 



MAIN LINE COMMITTEE 
MRS. CHARLES E. GOODMAN, Chairman 



JUNIOR MAIN LINE COMMITTEE 

MISS HELENE BOERICKE, Chairman 



Berwind 

BlDDI E 
IUS 
ISE CUKTIS BOK 



Dr. Thomas Gj Ashton 

Mrs. Thomas C. Ashton 

W. W. Atterbiry 

Samuel H. Barker 

John C. Bell 

Mrs. Henry A 

Mrs. J. WilmeJi 

Morris R. Boc : 

Mrs. Mary Lor 

John F. Braun 

Mrs. John Cad valader, Jr 

j. ha3eltine ckrstairs 

Mrs. Oswald Chew 

Clarence M. Clark 

Herbert L. Cl^rk 

Mrs. Alexander Brown Coxe 

Mrs. Charles E. Coxe 

Mrs. Henry Brinton Coxe 

Mrs. Theodore W. Cramp 

Cyrus H. K. Curtis 

Mrs. Cyrus H.! K. Curtis 

Mrs. George Dallas Dixon 

Dr. John T. Dorrance 

Russell Duans 

Mrs. Stanley G. Flagg, Jr. 

Miss Helen Fleisher 

Mrs. Francis 3. Gowen 

Albert M. Gk ken field 

John Ghibbel 

Walter HallaRan 



FOUNDERS 

William C. Hammer 

Mrs. William C. Hammer 

William E. Helme 

Mrs. Charles Wolcott Henry 

Walter E. Hering 

George Howe 

Mrs. Henry S. Jeanes 

C. Clothier Jones 

C. Hartman Kuhn 

Mrs. Charles M. Lea 

Mrs. Thomas Leaming 

Dr. Joseph Leidy 

Mrs. Joseph Leidy 

Philip Ludwell Leidy 

John Frederick Lewis 

Mrs. Andrew Lippi 

Mrs. Stacy B. Lloyd 

John Luther Long 

Mrs. George Horace Lorimer 

Charles Townsend Ludington 

J. Rutherford McAllister 

Harley T. McDermott 

Mrs. Henry Pratt McKean 

Thomas McKean 

Hon. J. Willis Martin 

Mrs. J. Willis Martin 

John C. Martin 

Jules E. Mastbaum 

Arthur E. Newbold, Jr. 

A. Edward Newton 

George W. Norris 

Presenting the 



George R. Packard 
E. Pusey Passmore 
Mrs. Eli Kirk Price 
Wilsoh Pritchett 
John Hall Rankin 
Miss Anne M. Reed 
G. Brinton Roberts 
Benjamin Rush 
Arthur W. Sewall 
Jacob Singer 

Miss Caroline S. Sinki.er 
Mrs. C. Shillard Smith 
Dr. Alfred Stengel 
Mrs. Leopold Stokowski 
Mrs. Edward T. Stotesbury 
Dr. George C. Stout 
Mrs. John B. Thayer 
Miss Anne Thomson 
Leopold A. von Seldf.neck 
Clarence A. Warden 
Harvey M. Watts 
Samuel P. Wetherii.l, Jr. 
Andrew Wheeler 
William B. Whelen 
Mrs. William B. Whelen 
William White 
Miss Frances A. Wister 
Mrs. Charles R. Wood 
Mrs. Harold E. Yarnall 



Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 



MRS. JOSEPH LEIDY 

President 



MRS. MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 
Chairman 



MRS. WILLIAM C HAMMER 
Director and General Manager 

PHILIP LUDWELL LEIDY 
Secretary and Counsel 

OFFICES 
Suite 1019, 1616 Walnut Street 










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